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Questions tagged [scattering]

Scattering is a general term for several physical processes in which radiation of some sort changes direction due to an interaction with a particle. Scattering can be classified by the type of radiation (ie, electromagnetic, x-ray, neutron), or by the relative sizes of the wave and the particle (ie, Rayleigh, Mie, geometric).

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11
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2k views

Are all scattering states un-normalizable?

I am an undergraduate studying quantum physics with the book of Griffiths. in 1-D problems, it said a free particle has un-normalizable states but normalizable states can be obtained by sum up the ...
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6answers
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Why can we treat quantum scattering problems as time-independent?

From what I remember in my undergraduate quantum mechanics class, we treated scattering of non-relativistic particles from a static potential like this: Solve the time-independent Schrodinger ...
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Scattering of light by light: experimental status

Scattering of light by light does not occur in the solutions of Maxwell's equations (since they are linear and EM waves obey superposition), but it is a prediction of QED (the most significant Feynman ...
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5answers
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Why does the sky change color? Why is the sky blue during the day, red during sunrise/set and black during the night?

Why does the sky change color? Why is the sky blue during the day, red during sunrise/set and black during the night?
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5answers
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What is the difference between Raman scattering and fluorescence?

What is the difference between Raman scattering and fluorescence? Both phenomena involve the emission of photons shifted in frequency relative to the incident light, because of some energetic ...
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2answers
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Why can't gravitons be created in traditional particle accelerators?

I've heard that it is incredibly difficult to detect a graviton, but I don't quite understand why. With all of the knowledge I have at the present time it seems like it should be possible to create a ...
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Why are scattering matrices unitary?

In Griffith's QM book, he introduces scattering matrices as an end-of-the-chapter Problem 2.52. For a Dirac-Delta potential $V(x) = \alpha \delta (x - x_0)$, I've derived the scattering matrix and ...
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Phase shifts in scattering theory

I have been studying scattering theory in Sakurai's quantum mechanics. The phase shift in scattering theory has been a major conceptual and computational stumbling block for me. How (if at all) does ...
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5answers
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Tree level QFT and classical fields/particles

It is well known that scattering cross-sections computed at tree level correspond to cross-sections in the classical theory. For example the tree level cross-section for electron-electron scattering ...
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Why does the moon sometimes appear giant and a orange red color near the horizon?

I've read various ideas about why the moon looks larger on the horizon. The most reasonable one in my opinion is that it is due to how our brain calculates (perceives) distance, with objects high ...
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What is the capture cross-section of a black hole region for ultra-relativistic particles?

What is the capture cross-section of a black hole region for ultra-relativistic particles? I have read that it is $$\sigma ~=~ \frac{27}{4}\pi R^{2}_{s}$$ for a Schwarzschild BH in the geometric ...
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Scattering, Perturbation and asymptotic states in LSZ reduction formula

I was following Schwarz's book on quantum field theory. There he defines the asymptotic momentum eigenstates $|i\rangle\equiv |k_1 k_2\rangle$ and $|f\rangle\equiv |k_3 k_4\rangle$ in the S-matrix ...
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Scalar Field Redefinition and Scattering Amplitude

Consider a field redefinition $$ \phi \rightarrow \phi' = \phi+\lambda \phi^2 $$ Find the Feynman rules for this theory and work out the $2\rightarrow 2$ scattering amplitude at tree level (The result ...
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Different kinds of S-matrices?

It seems to me that the notion of an "S-matrix" refers to several different objects One construction you can find in the literature is allowing the coupling constant to adiabatically approach 0 in ...
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1answer
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Reflectionless potentials in quantum mechanics

Scattering on potential $$V(x) = -\frac{(\hbar a)^2}{m}\text{sech}^2(ax)$$ with 1D equation of Schrodinger is famous problem. It is dealt with in Problem 2.48 of Griffiths book or online here. It is ...
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540 views

Divergence of the tree level scattering amplitude in quantum field theory

I'm studying a toy theory in quantum field theory. There are two free fields: a real massive scalar field $\phi$ with mass $M$ and a complex massive scalar field $\Psi$ with mass $m$. They are ...
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10answers
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Why can't we see gases?

I am not sure what causes gas molecules to be invisible.This question may look silly but I really want to know the story behind it.
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8answers
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Why aren't rainbows blurred-out into nothing after they are produced?

I understand how a prism works and how a single raindrop can scatter white light into a rainbow, but it seems to me that in normal atmospheric conditions, we should not be able to see rainbows. When ...
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What exactly is a bound state and why does it have negative energy?

Our professor hasn't explained what bound states are. Could you give me an idea of what they mean and their importance in quantum-mechanics problems with a potential (e.g. a potential described by a ...
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1answer
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When we define the S-matrix, what are “in” and “out” states?

I have seen the scattering matrix defined using initial ("in") and final ("out") eigenstates of the free hamiltonian, with $$\left| \vec{p}_1 \cdots \vec{p}_n \; \text{out} \right\rangle = S^{-1} \...
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Plane wave expansion in cylindrical coordinates

I am trying to solve scattering problem in 2D and got to expand the wave function in cylindrical system which comes out to be Hankel function. Can you tell me how to expand the plane wave $\exp(i {\...
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3answers
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Why is the laboratory frame energy always greater than the center of mass frame energy?

I have been looking for an answer to 'Why is the laboratory frame energy always greater than the center of mass frame energy during collisions?'. A lot of resources provided mathematical explanations....
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1answer
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Quark Radius Upper Bound

If quarks had internal structure (contradicting current beliefs), what is the lowest upper bound on their "radius" based on current experimental results? If possible, I'd prefer to only consider ...
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1answer
463 views

Specific electron energy gap values $E_{i+1}-E_i$ vs. photons with arbitrary energy $\hbar \omega$

The energy levels of electrons in an atom are quantized $E_i$. A photon of a specific momentum $\vec p$ and energy $$\omega=(E_{i+1}-E_i)/\hbar$$ hits an atom and gets absorbed. Okay now say the ...
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3answers
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How did Rutherford conclude that most of the mass (as well as the positive charge) was concentrated in the nucleus?

Geiger and Marsden's experiment led Rutherford to believe that the positive charge and most of the mass of the atom was concentrated in a small region. I understand what led him to conclude the way ...
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1answer
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Systematic way to draw all inequivalent Feynman diagrams

I am wondering whether there is some systematical approach to find Feynman diagrams for S-matrix (or to be more precise for $S-1$ since I am interested in scattering amplitude). For example in $\phi^3$...
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Why can the Euler beta function be interpreted as a scattering amplitude?

The Wikipedia article on the Veneziano Amplitude claims that the Euler beta function can be interpretted as a scattering amplitude. Why is this? In another word, when the Euler beta function is ...
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Scattering states of Hydrogen atom in non-relativistic perturbation theory

In doing second order time-independent perturbation theory in non-relativistic quantum mechanics one has to calculate the overlap between states $$E^{(2)}_n ~=~ \sum_{m \neq n}\frac{|\langle m | H' |...
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3answers
621 views

Use my example to explain why loop diagram will not occur in classical equation of motion?

We always say that tree levels are classical but loop diagrams are quantum. Let's talk about a concrete example: $$\mathcal{L}=\partial_a \phi\partial^a \phi-\frac{g}{4}\phi^4+\phi J$$ where $J$ is ...
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The contradiction between Gell-mann Low theorem and the identity of Møller operator $H\Omega_{+}=\Omega_{+}H_0$

This question originates from reading the proof of Gell-mann Low thoerem. $H=H_0+H_I$, let $|\psi_0\rangle$ be an eigenstate of $H_0$ with eigenvalue $E_0$, and consider the state vector defined as $$...
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1answer
344 views

Contact terms in Dyson-Schwinger equation can be ignored?

According to this text here http://www.physics.indiana.edu/~dermisek/QFT_09/qft-II-4-4p.pdf contact terms do not affect the scattering amplitude. But These contact Terms are there; the question is: ...
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3answers
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About the definition of the Møller operator

The Møller operator is defined as $$\Omega_+ = \lim_{t\rightarrow -\infty} U^\dagger (t) U_0(t).$$ Does the operator $$ \lim_{t\rightarrow -\infty} U_0^\dagger (t) U(t) $$ also make sense? Is it ...
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5answers
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Why is the sky of the moon always dark?

Why is the sky of the moon always dark compared to the sky of the earth, doesn't it have day and night like earth?
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1answer
457 views

How to correctly calculate the colour of the sky?

It is well-known that the sky is blue due to Rayleigh-scattering. What bothers me though is the question how to actually calculate the spectrum of the scattered sunlight. Yes, use one of the formulas ...
4
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1answer
2k views

Scattering Processes in Scalar Yukawa Theory

I'm trying to compute nucleon-nucleon scattering in scalar Yukawa theory. Here we view a nucleon as a complex scalar field $\psi$ and a meson as a real scalar field $\phi$. They interact through $H_I=...
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3answers
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Could the sky on a planet theoretically be any color?

The sky on the Earth is blue. Could the color of the sky on a planet with an atmosphere be of any color theoretically? Which colors are the most likely? I think it would be really awesome to have ...
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3answers
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Does the Breit Wigner formula apply to intermediate virtual particles?

Breit Wigner Formula describes the cross section for interactions that proceed dominantly via a intermediate particle (O*) A+B → O* → C + D: $$σ = \frac{2\Pi}{k^{2}}\frac{Γ_{i}Γ_{f}}{(E-E_{o})^{2} + (...
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6answers
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Why is the colour of sunlight yellow?

I was going through the preliminary papers of other schools and found a question that I did not know. It was "Why sunlight appears yellow?". Can anyone answer it?
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2answers
366 views

Will neutral particles be affected by EM waves?

Air molecules scatter sunlight and makes the sky blue. Many books say that the air molecules are oscillated by E field and so they become sources of EM waves. Is it because the air molecules have ...
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0answers
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Calculation of Feynman invariant amplitude with internal global symmetry indices: trace over\and isospin

This is a complete rewriting of the older post, making more clear the problem. The issue here is to compute the $$|M|^2 =4a^2(\delta_{ad}\delta_{bc} - \frac{1}{2} \delta_{ab}\delta_{cd}) ^2 (u_{1b}^{...
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3answers
999 views

Rayleigh equation as explanation for sky being blue

I've been reading up on the internet as to why the sky is blue. The answer usually cites Rayleigh scattering that I've checked on wikipedia: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rayleigh_scattering: $$ I=...
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1answer
120 views

What is the relationship between Mie scattering amplitudes, incident intensity and outgoing intensity?

Wikipedia's Mie scattering Mathematics discusses the scattering amplitudes $S_1(\theta), \ S_2(\theta)$ for each outgoing polarization of an incident EM plane wave on a uniform sphere. It defines the ...
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3answers
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Covariant Description of Light Scattering at a fastly rotating Cylinder

Let us consider the following Gedankenexperiment: A cylinder rotates symmetric around the $z$ axis with angular velocity $\Omega$ and a plane wave with $\mathbf{E}\text{, }\mathbf{B} \propto e^{\...
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1answer
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Proof of Yang's theorem

Yang's theorem states that a massive spin-1 particle cannot decay into a pair of identical massless spin-1 particles. The proof starts by going to the rest frame of the decaying particle, and relies ...
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1answer
709 views

Setting of renormalization scale in field theory calculations

In dimensional regularization an arbitrary mass parameter $\mu$ must be introduced in going to $4-\epsilon$ dimensions. I am trying to understand to what extent this parameter can be eliminated from ...
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1answer
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Scattering amplitude and LSZ formula

I'm arriving at a contradiction. To calculate the scattering amplitude, one usually follows the prescription given by the Feynman rules that you only consider fully connected diagrams with the ...
7
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2answers
538 views

Contradictory result for scalar-field propagator from Feynman rules and LSZ formula

I am trying to learn how to calculate scattering amplitudes in a Klein-Gordon theory. I am getting stuck with the simplest of the examples: $\phi\to\phi$ in a free scalar-field theory. If I calculate ...
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5answers
2k views

Does electron-electron scattering contribute to resistivity?

Electron-phonon and electron-defect scattering clearly contributes to resistance, but pure electron-electron scattering conserves the total momentum (and energy) of all the electrons. Then, how is it ...
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2answers
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Optical theorem and conservation of particle current

The optical theorem $$ \sigma_{tot} = \frac{4\pi}{k} \text{Im}(f(0)) $$ links the total cross section with the imaginary part of the scattering amplitude. My lecture notes say that this is a ...
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2answers
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Scattering vs bound states

Why are these states called as such, and how do they differ? I vaguely understand that when $E > 0$ you obtain a scattering state, but when $E < 0$ you have a bound state.