Questions tagged [resonance]

Resonance is a characteristic of physical systems having a structure that allows energy to flow between various states at a specific, oscillatory rate (resonant frequency). For a stable resonant system at steady state the internal energy is either fixed without losses or the rate of energy input is equal to the energy losses.

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588 views

What is the effect of mass on resonance amplitude?

When a system is undergoing forced oscillations, why does reducing the mass of the system cause the frequency response curve to shift downwards? I encountered this problem in a practice paper, but I ...
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Can vibrations be used to reduce friction?

This lecture by Julius Miller got me wondering if acoustic resonance (or vibration in general) can be used to reduce friction (or stiction). The answer seems to be no based on the observation that my ...
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How does a driving frequency induce resonance if it is not exactly equal to the natural frequency?

To my understanding when the driving frequency is equal to the natural/resonant frequency of the object, there is constructive interference between the oscillations of the object and driving force. ...
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Are resonances formed in scattering between a baryon and meson?

Consider the following reaction of strong interaction (in a scattering process) $$n+\pi^+\to \Lambda_0+K^+\tag{1}$$ Then the particle $\Lambda_0$ formed decays with weak interaction $$\Lambda_0\to ...
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285 views

What is the relationship between excitation and resonance?

From Resonance (particle physics) - Wikipedia: In particle physics, a resonance is the peak located around a certain energy found in differential cross sections of scattering experiments. These ...
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Time evolution of state in rotating $B$-field spin system

I'm given a state $|\psi(t)\rangle$ that solves the time dependent Schroedinger equation with the Hamilton operator $\hat{H}(t)$. $\hat{H}(t)$ describes a Spin-$\frac{1}{2}$ in a rotating magnetic ...
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What is the mathematical basis behind using a chirp signal to determine the resonant frequency of a second order differential system?

It is a common practise for engineers to try to determine the resonant frequency of a system through a chirp signal. Given a damped oscillating system with displacement $x$, driven by a chirp signal ...
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How is sound produced in pea whistles? (I think they're called police whistles in the US.)

I read the topic called 'Whistle Physics' on this forum. From what I gathered there, @alephzero seemed to be saying that changes in air pressure cause air to be alternately sucked in and pushed out of ...
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Why are the nodes of an open tubular bell located at .224*L instead of .25*L?

Say that we have a tube of length $L$. In the tube, there is a standing wave of wavelength $\lambda$. Then, $L=\lambda$. $\hspace{2.5cm}$ In the above diagram, the wave's amplitude is highest at ...
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116 views

Resonance and modes

I use a metal body (let's say cooking pot) in which I induce eddy current via induction at certain frequency which I can change as I wish. Every object has it's own accustic resonant frequency. If ...
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Air flow through a penny whistle

I am confused about exactly how air flows through a penny whistle. I would also like to double check that I understand correctly what the cavity of resonance is. Say I have a whistle like this: <...
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Measuring time in the photoelectric effect

Consider the following hypothetical: An atom is traveling with a velocity of v to the left, directly towards an incoming photon, as crudely depicted below. p----> <----A Question (1): What is ...
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What is the geometry of DeBroglie standing waves?

I asked a similar question here . But never received a complete answer. So I've made the question more specific to DeBroglie waves. So from what I've read DeBroglie waves are indeed standing waves ...
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What 2d shapes would have the most resonant frequencies?

A square Chladni plate has a handful of resonant frequencies in the audio range. If you wanted to make a plate with very many (infinite?) resonant frequencies, what shape would be best? You wouldn't ...
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356 views

Designing a high-$Q$ RLC circuit

I would like to make a series RLC circuit which will serve as RF receiver. I would like very high frequency selectivity, i.e. narrow bandwidth, i.e. $\pm$200 Hz. The sharpness of a resonance is ...
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Is my understanding of standing wave resonance satisfactory in this exercise?

As the title suggests, I'm wondering how I handled the following exercise checks out: A loudspeaker is placed close to one end of a pipe that is open at both ends. The loudspeaker is driven by a ...
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What are all the possible ways to achieve acoustic resonance in a cavity?

If one were to observe acoustic resonance in a cavity (semi-closed volume of space) what is the complete list of potential hypotheses as to the cause? In my limited experience I can list the ...
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1answer
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The Helmholtz resonator, what's actually resonating?

I'm trying to more closely understand the physical mechanism behind the Helmholtz resonator. If I model the resonator in terms of an analogous series linear electrical circuit: resistance ($R$), ...
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Is there a resonance frequency to air itself?

Obviously a lot of things cause air to vibrate, but does air have an actual resonance frequency?
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How to reconcile infinite cross section of resonances with cross section formula from quantum mechanics?

If we consider $s$-wave scattering for two scalar fields $\phi$ and $\chi$ with an interaction $\frac{g}{2}\phi^2\chi$, then the Lorentz-invariant scattering amplitude to second order is: $\mathcal{M}...
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Air oscillation at open window of a moving car

When driving a car with an open window one can hear (and feel) oscillations of air at the threshold of the open window. I used to think the open window and the car interior were forming a Helmholtz ...
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1answer
372 views

mode-locked laser Repetition Rate

I don't understand how we can produce a laser system with different (lower) repetition rate than the resonant frequency of the cavity? In other words, when we have different resonating modes, then ...
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The “watering hole” frequency versus microwave oven frequency

I recently learned about the "watering hole," a group of frequencies between 1.42 and 1.66 GHz. I also read that microwave ovens operate at 2.4 GHz. If 21 to 18 cm (1.42 to 1.66 GHz) is the resonant ...
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Renormalising $\Delta$ baryon mass in chiral effective field theory

I have essentially no experience of quantum field theory, other than a superficial knowledge of some basic ideas - my apologies if I've phrased anything unusually or made any mistakes in my question ...
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Why do piezoelectric elements have a resonant frequency?

While working with a piezoelectric element, I noticed some high frequency oscillations at 6kHz. I can't figure out why the piezo element has a resonant frequency. This is unlikely to be noise as there ...
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1answer
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In mechanical systems, it is easier to understand concept of natural frequency, could somebody explain natural frequency in electronic elements?

In mechanical systems, natural frequency simply means the frequency at which the body will oscillate when it is disturbed(assuming the body will suffer zero resistance in motion) but wihle studying ...
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Has anyone driven a bell or tuning fork using light?

In principle a metal bell or tuning fork of sufficiently high quality factor could be driven by audio frequency radio waves of sufficient power to produce an audible hum. Has this been done, yet? If ...
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How do I calculate the resonance frequency of a block of material?

I would like to know how I go about calculating the resonance frequency for an object, given its material properties and dimensions. For example, a small rectangle $X$ by $Y$ by $Z$ dimensions, I ...
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125 views

Finding the resonant frequency of a rectangular resonator filled with a magnetic material

The prompt is to find the resonant frequency $f_r$ of a rectangular resonator which is filled with a magnetic material rather than standard air or vacuum. I'm confused as how the resonance frequency ...
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2answers
773 views

How to determine resonance frequency of RLC circuit empirically?

I have a series RLC circuit and I can find its theoretical resonance frequency. However, I would like to verify this value through testing. How can I find the resonant frequency? The tools I have are ...
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1answer
123 views

Physically, why an oscillating voltage source doesn't see the inductor or the capacitor at resonance?

In an RLC circuit the Mathematics says that some voltage is stored in the LC portion of the circuit, and the rest goes to the resistors, unless the source is oscillating at the resonance frequency. ...
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1answer
143 views

Resonance: Conceptual misunderstanding

I am used to thinking of the resonance phenomenon in terms of a small driving force building up a large vibration amplitude. But when you solve the equation for a damped, driven oscillator, you get a ...
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2answers
546 views

What's the role and the physics behind a sound box?

I'm interested in the manufacturing of violins. I was wondering what the role of the sounding box? Why would it be worse if there were just a sound board? Does the box just have to redirect the ...
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Singing glass and wavelength

Hello Stackexchange people, I have question concerning the singing glass: Is the audible sound that is heard the same as that of sound in air (around 340 m/s) or is the same as sound in glass? To ...
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Are there physics, theories that predict standing wave harmonic deviations in curved tubes?

For cylinders, it's widely documented how to predict the harmonic frequencies given the length of the tube, the end conditions and the speed of sound which is in turn determined by what gas is in the ...
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resonanting frequency phase [closed]

I know phase at resonating frequency is Zero!! Now the question is, can anyone help me to prove it. I was looking for a better clarification with diagrams that can help me grasp the concept.
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309 views

Translation of Heisenberg's papers

Is there any English translation for he following Heisenberg's paper? "Mehrkörperproblem und Resonanz in der Quantenmechanik", Zeitschrift für Physik, Volume 38, Issue 6-7, pp. 411-426. Publication ...
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In laymen terms, what is wave resonance? [closed]

I am unable to understand resonance currently, how could we determine what resonance is in laymen terms?
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Better understanding natural resonance frequency and simple harmonic motion

Let me see if I'm getting this understood correctly. I'm trying to make sure my interpretation of simple harmonic motion is the right interpretation, including my take on resonant frequency. Okay, so ...
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2answers
647 views

Why do all materials resonate? [duplicate]

Why do things vibrate with resonant frequencies. Why are there multiple frequencies from one impulse? ammendment: Why do chimes from bells have overtones? How to drums have overtones? What is ...
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Model for sound generated by air flowing through pipe

I'm trying to write a program simulating the sound of an petrol car engine, just for fun. As a part of this, I'm trying to model the sound of air escaping the combustion chamber through an open ...
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1answer
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How can a 2.1 Hz excitation induce resonant vibrations in a structure with a fundamental frequency at 6.3 Hz?

I've come across an example given in a footfall design guide wherein it's mentioned that a floor with a fundamental frequency of 6.3 Hz can be excited to resonance by a person walking at 2.1 Hz ...
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Why do some things resonate more than others? - How does resonance work?

Why do some things resonate more than others? I was holding a guitar next to a bass amplifier, when the bass hit the string at a certain note, the same note began to vibrate in the guitar. If I ...
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1answer
135 views

What is 'harmonic likeness'?

While reading about sympathetic vibrations/resonance, I came across the term 'harmonic likeness'. Sympathetic resonance or sympathetic vibration is a harmonic phenomenon wherein a formerly passive ...
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59 views

How is a source of sound in air set up a sound wave in an elastic medium such as glass?

I asked a question here about breaking a wine glass by resonance. This brings me to another question. How does the sound wave in the air set up an sound wave in the glass? In this case, one does not ...
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Why does an acoustic guitar body amplify all notes and not just certain ones?

We all heard that acoustic guitar body acts as the amplifier of the sound created by wire plucking and strumming. This is because an acoustic guitar body is some kind of resonator. Every resonator ...
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1answer
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Input impedances of terminated sections of transmission line

When dealing with optics and dielectric waveguides, a way to obtain the guided modes is to impose the "transverse resonance condition". Let the following be a transmission line with characteristic ...
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3answers
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Is the displacement of a driving oscillator in phase with the driving force?

In a set up such as the following: I have read in many places that below resonance the driving force is in phase with the harmonic oscillator. I have also read that the driving oscillator is in phase ...
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Why does energy loss cause end corrections?

Several people have said that end corrections occur because of acoustic radiation or something similar, where energy is used in vibrating the air outside the pipe. How exactly does energy loss cause ...
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Intuitive Cause for End Corrections

I have looked for an intuitive description for the reasons for end corrections. I find most of them with mathematics far beyond my level (high school). I found two sites that attempted to explain it, ...

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