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Questions tagged [resonance]

Resonance is a characteristic of physical systems having a structure that allows energy to flow between various states at a specific, oscillatory rate (resonant frequency). For a stable resonant system at steady state the internal energy is either fixed without losses or the rate of energy input is equal to the energy losses.

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Is there a resonance frequency to air itself?

Obviously a lot of things cause air to vibrate, but does air have an actual resonance frequency?
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How to reconcile infinite cross section of resonances with cross section formula from quantum mechanics?

If we consider $s$-wave scattering for two scalar fields $\phi$ and $\chi$ with an interaction $\frac{g}{2}\phi^2\chi$, then the Lorentz-invariant scattering amplitude to second order is: $\mathcal{M}...
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Air oscillation at open window of a moving car

When driving a car with an open window one can hear (and feel) oscillations of air at the threshold of the open window. I used to think the open window and the car interior were forming a Helmholtz ...
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241 views

mode-locked laser Repetition Rate

I don't understand how we can produce a laser system with different (lower) repetition rate than the resonant frequency of the cavity? In other words, when we have different resonating modes, then ...
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615 views

The “watering hole” frequency versus microwave oven frequency

I recently learned about the "watering hole," a group of frequencies between 1.42 and 1.66 GHz. I also read that microwave ovens operate at 2.4 GHz. If 21 to 18 cm (1.42 to 1.66 GHz) is the resonant ...
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Renormalising $\Delta$ baryon mass in chiral effective field theory

I have essentially no experience of quantum field theory, other than a superficial knowledge of some basic ideas - my apologies if I've phrased anything unusually or made any mistakes in my question ...
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1answer
831 views

Why do piezoelectric elements have a resonant frequency?

While working with a piezoelectric element, I noticed some high frequency oscillations at 6kHz. I can't figure out why the piezo element has a resonant frequency. This is unlikely to be noise as there ...
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In mechanical systems, it is easier to understand concept of natural frequency, could somebody explain natural frequency in electronic elements?

In mechanical systems, natural frequency simply means the frequency at which the body will oscillate when it is disturbed(assuming the body will suffer zero resistance in motion) but wihle studying ...
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2answers
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Has anyone driven a bell or tuning fork using light?

In principle a metal bell or tuning fork of sufficiently high quality factor could be driven by audio frequency radio waves of sufficient power to produce an audible hum. Has this been done, yet? If ...
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How do I calculate the resonance frequency of a block of material?

I would like to know how I go about calculating the resonance frequency for an object, given its material properties and dimensions. For example, a small rectangle $X$ by $Y$ by $Z$ dimensions, I ...
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Finding the resonant frequency of a rectangular resonator filled with a magnetic material

The prompt is to find the resonant frequency $f_r$ of a rectangular resonator which is filled with a magnetic material rather than standard air or vacuum. I'm confused as how the resonance frequency ...
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How to determine resonance frequency of RLC circuit empirically?

I have a series RLC circuit and I can find its theoretical resonance frequency. However, I would like to verify this value through testing. How can I find the resonant frequency? The tools I have are ...
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1answer
91 views

Physically, why an oscillating voltage source doesn't see the inductor or the capacitor at resonance?

In an RLC circuit the Mathematics says that some voltage is stored in the LC portion of the circuit, and the rest goes to the resistors, unless the source is oscillating at the resonance frequency. ...
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1answer
135 views

Resonance: Conceptual misunderstanding

I am used to thinking of the resonance phenomenon in terms of a small driving force building up a large vibration amplitude. But when you solve the equation for a damped, driven oscillator, you get a ...
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2answers
291 views

What's the role and the physics behind a sound box?

I'm interested in the manufacturing of violins. I was wondering what the role of the sounding box? Why would it be worse if there were just a sound board? Does the box just have to redirect the ...
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1answer
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Singing glass and wavelength

Hello Stackexchange people, I have question concerning the singing glass: Is the audible sound that is heard the same as that of sound in air (around 340 m/s) or is the same as sound in glass? To ...
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Are there physics, theories that predict standing wave harmonic deviations in curved tubes?

For cylinders, it's widely documented how to predict the harmonic frequencies given the length of the tube, the end conditions and the speed of sound which is in turn determined by what gas is in the ...
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1answer
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resonanting frequency phase [closed]

I know phase at resonating frequency is Zero!! Now the question is, can anyone help me to prove it. I was looking for a better clarification with diagrams that can help me grasp the concept.
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1answer
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Translation of Heisenberg's papers

Is there any English translation for he following Heisenberg's paper? "Mehrkörperproblem und Resonanz in der Quantenmechanik", Zeitschrift für Physik, Volume 38, Issue 6-7, pp. 411-426. Publication ...
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In laymen terms, what is wave resonance? [closed]

I am unable to understand resonance currently, how could we determine what resonance is in laymen terms?
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Better understanding natural resonance frequency and simple harmonic motion

Let me see if I'm getting this understood correctly. I'm trying to make sure my interpretation of simple harmonic motion is the right interpretation, including my take on resonant frequency. Okay, so ...
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Why do all materials resonate? [duplicate]

Why do things vibrate with resonant frequencies. Why are there multiple frequencies from one impulse? ammendment: Why do chimes from bells have overtones? How to drums have overtones? What is ...
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Model for sound generated by air flowing through pipe

I'm trying to write a program simulating the sound of an petrol car engine, just for fun. As a part of this, I'm trying to model the sound of air escaping the combustion chamber through an open ...
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1answer
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How can a 2.1 Hz excitation induce resonant vibrations in a structure with a fundamental frequency at 6.3 Hz?

I've come across an example given in a footfall design guide wherein it's mentioned that a floor with a fundamental frequency of 6.3 Hz can be excited to resonance by a person walking at 2.1 Hz ...
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Why do some things resonate more than others? - How does resonance work?

Why do some things resonate more than others? I was holding a guitar next to a bass amplifier, when the bass hit the string at a certain note, the same note began to vibrate in the guitar. If I ...
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1answer
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What is 'harmonic likeness'?

While reading about sympathetic vibrations/resonance, I came across the term 'harmonic likeness'. Sympathetic resonance or sympathetic vibration is a harmonic phenomenon wherein a formerly passive ...
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How is a source of sound in air set up a sound wave in an elastic medium such as glass?

I asked a question here about breaking a wine glass by resonance. This brings me to another question. How does the sound wave in the air set up an sound wave in the glass? In this case, one does not ...
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Why does an acoustic guitar body amplify all notes and not just certain ones?

We all heard that acoustic guitar body acts as the amplifier of the sound created by wire plucking and strumming. This is because an acoustic guitar body is some kind of resonator. Every resonator ...
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Input impedances of terminated sections of transmission line

When dealing with optics and dielectric waveguides, a way to obtain the guided modes is to impose the "transverse resonance condition". Let the following be a transmission line with characteristic ...
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Is the displacement of a driving oscillator in phase with the driving force?

In a set up such as the following: I have read in many places that below resonance the driving force is in phase with the harmonic oscillator. I have also read that the driving oscillator is in phase ...
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Why does energy loss cause end corrections?

Several people have said that end corrections occur because of acoustic radiation or something similar, where energy is used in vibrating the air outside the pipe. How exactly does energy loss cause ...
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Intuitive Cause for End Corrections

I have looked for an intuitive description for the reasons for end corrections. I find most of them with mathematics far beyond my level (high school). I found two sites that attempted to explain it, ...
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994 views

How is the relationship between the end correction and the pipe diameter related to acoustic impedance?

I know that Levine and Schwinger calculated the exact value of the end correction by doing something with the acoustic impedance but I don't understand their calculations. I've looked at paisanco's ...
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1answer
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How does an inverted cup make music in the bathroom?

A partially filled inverted cup immersed in a bucketful of water makes musical notes, when you turn on the tap and let the water fall continuously into the bucket. Whereas no music is made if you ...
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Why is the amplitude of a forced vibration lower above resonance than below? [duplicate]

Am I correct in thinking that for a given harmonic oscillator, with constant magnitude driving force, the resultant amplitude of the steady-state motion will be generally lower above resonance than ...
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Amplitude of oscillations in non-resonant forced vibrations

I am somewhat confused about the amplitude of forced vibrations at non-resonance driving frequencies. If I was to assume that there was no / negligible damping present, then at resonance, the ...
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Progressive and regressive wave combination to get the most general form of one dimensional standing wave

Te most general form of a (one dimension) standing wave is $$(A \mathrm{cos}(\omega t)+B \mathrm{sin}(\omega t))(C \mathrm{cos}(k x)+D \mathrm{sin}(k x))=G\mathrm{cos}(\omega t+\phi_1)\mathrm{cos}(kz+\...
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1answer
108 views

What degenerates mode in a fiber have in common? Do they have the same eigenvalues?

According to the definition degenerates modes in a optical fiber "have the same propagation constants". These modes can be combined to from the linearly polarized modes. This "constant" should be the ...
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2answers
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Can there be resonance in electromagnetic waves?

So, resonance is created in sound waves when a body is made to vibrate by an external force at its natural frequency, the result is a build-up amplitude and higher intensity of sound. Similarly can we ...
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1answer
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Window choice in single mode or multi mode optical fiber

Single mode fibers are typically used in third window, while multi mode fibers are used in first and second window, as in picture. Is there a correlation between the number of modes in the fiber and ...
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1answer
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Boundary condition on $\mathbf{B}$ to describe resonant cavities from waveguides

In Jackson- Classical Electrodynamics when resonant cavities are discussed (8.6, page 252) (but also at page 7 here or at page 19 here) the explanation is made by saying that the solution is the same ...
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Standing waves in antenna: why is the current wave symmetric with respect to the centre?

In trasmitting antennas the current is described with a standing wave (in resonant configuration). Since the current must be zero at both ends of the antenna (it could not be otherwise) the mechanical ...
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Natural and Resonance frequencies of a damped oscillator

The damped oscillator equation is \begin{equation} m\ddot{x}+b\dot{x}+kx=0 \end{equation} And its solution has natural frequency $\omega_0$ \begin{equation} \omega_0=\sqrt{\frac{k}{m}-(\frac{b}{2m})...
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Factors which make Tuning fork sound loud and hold for longer duration

I want to demonstrate some activities related to sound and tuning fork among kids. I have a couple of these including C256Hz, C 380 Hz etc. When I put these on a wooden resonance box the sound ...
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Meaning of complex oscillation equation

I have the problem of a dampened harmonic oscillation (more concrete a "Pohl wheel" (here is an illustration of it)) whose motion is given by the following differential equation $$J\frac{d^2 \alpha}{d ...
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Driven oscillator solution intuition

For the sinusoidally driven oscillator given by: $$m\ddot{x} + b \dot{x} + kx = F_0 \cos(\omega t)$$ or $$\ddot{x} + 2\beta \dot{x} + \omega_0^2x = A \cos(\omega t)$$ The particular solution is: $...
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Why do scattered waves vanish when the wavenumber of the incident wave is an eigenvalue of the interior Dirichlet problem. Where has the energy gone?

I normally work with numerical computations for wave scattering, but I am now trying get a better understanding of the physical processes underlying the theory, in particular what happens to the ...
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Standing spherical wave solution

Let's say we have a spherically symmetric light wave $u(r,t,\theta,\phi)= u(r,t)$ that satisfies the following wave equation with spherically symmetric potential $V(r)=2/r^2$ (also set $c= 1$ so $\...
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Resonance condition in transmission line

In this document, a transmission line terminated at both ends with purely reactive loads is considered as an example for the Transverse Resonance Method. In order for this circuit to be resonant, ...
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Does an air column require an antinode at an end to produce a sound?

I have a general understanding of how everything works. I understand standing waves, and the difference between open- and closed-ended tubes. I understand that for closed-ended tubes, the tube must ...