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Questions tagged [resonance]

Resonance is a characteristic of physical systems having a structure that allows energy to flow between various states at a specific, oscillatory rate (resonant frequency). For a stable resonant system at steady state the internal energy is either fixed without losses or the rate of energy input is equal to the energy losses.

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A conceptual doubt regarding Forced Oscillations and Resonance

While studying about the Resonance and Forced Oscillations, I came across a graph in my textbook that is given below:- Now, the author writes As the amount of damping increases, the peak shifts ...
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How do you define the resonance frequency of a forced damped oscillator?

Consider a forced, damped harmonic oscillator $$\ddot{\phi} + 2\beta \dot{\phi} + \omega_0^2 \phi = j(t) \, .\tag{1}$$ If I pick a sinusoidal driving force $j(t) = A \cos(\Omega t)$, I find $$\phi(...
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Phase difference of driving frequency and oscillating frequency

Suppose a mass is attached to a spring and is oscillating (SHM). If a driving force is applied, it must be at the same frequency as the mass' oscillation frequency. However I'm told that the phase ...
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Theory behind patterns formed on Chladni plates?

In this video of vibrating Chladni plates we can see small sand particles align themselves into different interesting patterns (also shown in the image below) which correspond to some particular ...
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Why do tuning forks have two prongs?

I believe the purpose of a tuning fork is to produce a single pure frequency of vibration. How do two coupled vibrating prongs isolate a single frequency? Is it possible to produce the same effect ...
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Physical reason behind having greater amplitude when driving frequency$ < $ natural frequency than that when driving frequency $>$ natural frequency

This is quoted from A.P.French's Vibrations & Waves: If the driving force is of low frequency relative to the natural frequency, we would expect the particle to move essentially with the ...
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Question on open organ pipe

Although open organ pipe is open on both ends, how standing waves are produced in a open organ pipe. Can someone explain with more clarity?
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Why, when one opens 1 car window, does that noise occur?

When you're driving and you open 1 car window, say the front one, there comes a horrible noise, but when you open another window just the slightest bit, this noise goes away (I'm sure most people know ...
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Reflection of sound waves from the open end of an organ pipe & relationship b/w nodes & pressure [duplicate]

We know that standing waves are created when any wave traveling along the medium will reflect back when they reach the end. But in an open organ pipe, there is nothing to oppose the wave and reflect ...
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Definition of the $Q$ factor?

According to Wikipedia, the $Q$ factor is defined as: $$Q=2\pi\frac{\mathrm{energy \, \, stored}}{\mathrm{energy \, \,dissipated \, \, per \, \, cycle}}.$$ Here are my questions: Does the energy ...
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Why don't tuning forks have three prongs?

I was reading Why tuning forks have two prongs?. The top answer said the reason was to reduce oscillation through the hand holding the other prong. So if having 2 prongs will reduce oscillation loss, ...
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Science behind the singing wine glass

A wine glass filled with water (approximately half or a quarter), when you use a wet finger and rub the top of the wine glass, the wine glass will produce a sound. I heard that it is because of the "...
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What is the qualitative cause for a driven oscillator to have a max. amplitude during resonance?

The steady-state motion of a driven oscillator is given by;$$x =\underset{\text{amplitude}} {\dfrac{F_0}{m({\omega_0}^2 - {\omega}^2)}} \cos\omega t.$$ As we see, the amplitude becomes maximum when $$\...
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What is the essential difference between a resonance and a particle?

Let me start by explaining my particle physics background is very patchy, so this question may not be as coherent as I would like it to be. In general terms, what is the difference between a ...
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Chladni Plate Mathematics

I am a high school student doing an IB Extended Essay investigation concerning the resonant frequencies of Chladni plates of differing materials and sizes. Would someone please explain the definition ...
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Resonances in high energy physics

I still do not understand what a resonance precisely is. Is it exactly the same as a particle? Or only an excited state? And why does it make a peak in some diagrams? And which diagrams?
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What is the resonant frequency of liquid water?

I learned it's not 2.45 GHz. But what is it, then? In my failure to find the real value, I'm starting to wonder: does it even make sense talking about a resonant frequency of water molecules?
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Why does an acoustic guitar body amplify all notes and not just certain ones?

We all heard that acoustic guitar body acts as the amplifier of the sound created by wire plucking and strumming. This is because an acoustic guitar body is some kind of resonator. Every resonator ...
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$Q$ factor of parallel RLC circuit in series with a capacitor and resistor

I know that for parallel RLC circuits, the $Q$ factor is given by: $$ Q = R \sqrt {\frac{C}{L}} $$ But now suppose it is connected in series to a resistor $R_2$ and capacitor $C_2$. Would the $Q$ ...
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Does the Breit Wigner formula apply to intermediate virtual particles?

Breit Wigner Formula describes the cross section for interactions that proceed dominantly via a intermediate particle (O*) A+B → O* → C + D: $$σ = \frac{2\Pi}{k^{2}}\frac{Γ_{i}Γ_{f}}{(E-E_{o})^{2} + (...
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Why are the closed and open ends of an organ pipe nodes and anti-nodes?

Here is a diagram of a wave in an organ pipe you'll find in most physics books Waves in air are longitudinal (not traversal), so what do the curves represent? Why are the open ends always anti nodes ...
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Why does a container with fluid make different sounds at different fluid levels?

Have you ever noticed that when you are filling a container with fluid. As it approaches the top, it makes a different sound? You can tell by listening when your about to reach the top. Why is this?
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What's the difference between NMR and EPR?

Both NMR and EPR describe the response of magnetic spin to external field. When collecting data, how do you know you're looking at nucleus spin flip or electron spin flip? In other words, since every ...
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How does energy transfer between B and E in an EM standing wave?

I'm trying to understand how an electric field induces a magnetic field and vice versa, its associated energy, as well as relating it to my understanding of waves on a string. Using a standing wave ...
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RLC circuit - calculating resonant frequency

If I take a series RLC circuit connected to a battery, the impedance is minimized when $\omega = \frac{1}{\sqrt{LC}}$. I also know that the series RLC circuit is analogous to a damped driven harmonic ...
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How to derive end-correction value relationship for open-ended air columns?

According to Young and Freedman's Physics textbook, in open-ended air columns like some woodwind instruments, the position of the displacement antinode extends a tiny amount beyond the end of the ...
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Resonances in QFT

I am a bit confused about resonances in QFT. I am reading Schwarz's QFT book and as far as I understand, if in a reaction the mass of the particle acting as a propagator is bigger than the sum of the ...
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Does the frequency of a organ pipe changes with its diameter? Explain

I am confused a bit does the frequency of a organ pipe have relation with its diameter or not.
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An analogy for resonance?

I learned that the phenomena of resonance occurs when the frequency of the applied force is equal to the natural frequency of an object. At this point, an object vibrates with maximum amplitude. How ...
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What is the relationship between excitation and resonance?

From Resonance (particle physics) - Wikipedia: In particle physics, a resonance is the peak located around a certain energy found in differential cross sections of scattering experiments. These ...
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Is the displacement of a driving oscillator in phase with the driving force?

In a set up such as the following: I have read in many places that below resonance the driving force is in phase with the harmonic oscillator. I have also read that the driving oscillator is in phase ...
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Does the human body have a resonant frequency? If so, how strong is it?

Inspired by this question on Music beta SE, I'm wondering if the human body has a strong resonant frequency. I guess the fact that it's largely a bag of jelly would add a lot of damping to the system, ...
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How does a guitar work?

Here are four different possible ways: The plucked string vibrates longitudinally, vibrating the air around it. This vibrating air then causes the air inside the sound box to vibrate also, which ...
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The demise of the Tacoma Narrows bridge was casused by aeroelastic flutter. But isn't that just a special case of resonance?

Much of the research I've done on the Tacoma Narrows bridge disaster of 1940 attribute the collapse of the bridge due to aeroelastic flutter - not strucural resonance. But isn't aeroelastic flutter ...
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Natural and Resonance frequencies of a damped oscillator

The damped oscillator equation is \begin{equation} m\ddot{x}+b\dot{x}+kx=0 \end{equation} And its solution has natural frequency $\omega_0$ \begin{equation} \omega_0=\sqrt{\frac{k}{m}-(\frac{b}{2m})...
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Non-resonant but efficient frequencies

I understand that if the frequency of a driving force coincides with the natural frequency of an oscillator (say a pendulum), the rate at which energy is transferred to the same is maximized. However, ...
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Can gravitational waves resonate?

Can gravitational waves resonate? - Perhaps by creating standing wave interference in a cavity? Could that feasibly happen either in nature or by engineering?
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How does radio receives signal from particular station?

When you tune your radio (digital or analog) to receive say 100 MHz frequency and while in the environment there are hundreds of channels everywhere around the radio. How does it chooses to receive ...
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Why maximum energy transfer at natural frequency even if max amplitude occurs below $f_0$

This is a paragraph from my book: "For a damped system, the resonant frequency at which the amplitude is a maximum is lower than the natural frequency.However, maximum transfer of energy, or energy ...
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Why the common beam in Barton's pendulum?

N So the theory is that R vibrates with largest amplitude due to resonance. Because when measured from the common beam its length is the same as that of A, so A's vibration would pass to R the same ...
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Why is the sound of filling a container with liquid always the same regardless of container?

I found a similar question asking why the sound changes as fluid level changes. Foobarbeque's answer mentions Helmholtz Resonance, and that the frequency depends on cavity volume, length of neck and ...
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Is the length of the day increasing?

In Frontiers of Astronomy, Fred Hoyle advanced an idea from E.E.R.Holmberg that although the Earth's day was originally much shorter than it is now, and has lengthened owing to tidal friction, that ...
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The Solar System explosion in the Nice model

This video depicts one variant of the Nice model (pronounced "neese", like the city in France). I'll briefly describe it in case the link ever dies. Here is the initial configuration: The four ...
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Why would oscillation of a gas column inhibit rather than promote mixing?

Many years ago I helped to support an experiment conducted in Japan which investigated the effects of high frequency oscillation ventilation (HFOV) on the mixing and distribution of gas into the lungs....
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Forced Oscillations & Resonance

I need a very much physical explanation for the phenomenon of Resonance associated with forced oscillations (damped). I have gone through HRW and Concepts of Physics by H C Verma, but that wasn't of ...
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Where exactly is the antinode of an air column with open-closed boundary conditions?

Suppose that I have an air column with closed-open boundary condition. The air pressure at the open end of the tube is constrained to match the atmospheric pressure of the surrounding air. Therefore,...
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Meaning of “phase delay” in forced oscillations [duplicate]

I'm currently reading about forced oscillations, and in the book (A course in Classical Physics by Alessandro Bettini) I'm using, they start with the equation $$\frac{d^2x}{dt^2} + \gamma\frac{dx}{dt}...
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Why is the resonance frequency of an undamped oscillator equal to the undamped resonance?

I have read this post: 'How do you define the resonance frequency of a forced damped oscillator?' And I see that the resonant frequency occurs at the undamped oscillation frequency $\omega_0$ as ...
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Parallel RLC circuit, how branching currents may each be larger than source current at resonance?

How can the branching currents individually be greater than the source current?
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Vibrational frequency of piezoelectric material

When a piezoelectric material experience a stress it generates voltage, and also when you applied voltage the piezo-material experience a vibrational frequency. Using oscilloscope we can determine the ...