Questions tagged [resonance]

Resonance is a characteristic of physical systems having a structure that allows energy to flow between various states at a specific, oscillatory rate (resonant frequency). For a stable resonant system at steady state the internal energy is either fixed without losses or the rate of energy input is equal to the energy losses.

Filter by
Sorted by
Tagged with
0 votes
0 answers
20 views

Could a Haptic Actuator change the natural frequency of an object?

Could a Haptic Actuator which can operate in the 10 - 500hz frequency range be used to modify a wooden objects natural frequency?
user avatar
3 votes
2 answers
84 views

How can you change the resonant frequency of a solid guitar body?

I am trying to figure out if it would be possible to change the resonant natural frequency of a solid-body guitar. For example, let's say it resonates at 100 Hz and I want it to resonate at 200 Hz. Is ...
user avatar
9 votes
1 answer
704 views

Intuition behind the differential equation for forced oscillations

The differential equation for forced oscillation is: $$m \ddot{x} + b\dot{x}+kx = F_{o}\sin(\omega''t)$$ I don't find this equation intuitively satisfying. My mind tends to think that as $F_{o}\sin(\...
user avatar
  • 225
0 votes
0 answers
39 views

Natural frequency of electrons and the Hydrogen atom

Natural frequency is the frequency of a system when it vibrates freely without damping. I am in need of clarification about the definition of natural frequency at the atomic and molecular levels. Let'...
user avatar
  • 1,187
0 votes
0 answers
12 views

Entropy and resonance

I'm interested in determining whether the entropy of a vibrating string fixed at two ends can be expressed as a function of frequency. Particularly, the entropy at resonant frequencies. I'm not sure ...
user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
27 views

Does air column change its frequency to one of its modes as and when needed?

The question might make it sound like I'm considering air column to be a conscious entity kinda thing, but what I really mean is, Say I've a tuning fork ringing and I bring it near a test tube with ...
user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
31 views

Why the prongs of a tuning fork have different oscillation phases?

I've been reading many questions about why tuning fork has two prongs. Many of them explain that each prong oscillates with opposite phases. As a consequence, the compression and decompression of air ...
user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
36 views

Calculate the Frequency of Clamped Bar

I'm trying to calculate the resonant frequency of a clamped bar or rather I'm trying to calculate what length of bar to use to get a certain frequency. The goal is to be able to use this to make ...
user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
22 views

Astigmatism in bow tie cavity

I am a bit confused about how to account for the astigmatism in a bow tie cavity. I did the math for the resonant frequency of the tangential and sagittal direction of a Gaussian beam, and I got in my ...
user avatar
  • 563
0 votes
0 answers
60 views

At resonance, there is infinite oscillation (new)

As per a previous question: Transient behavour For a driven harmonic oscillator: I was trying to show an exponential increase in amplitude using the transient solution, however I still got the sake ...
user avatar
  • 3,824
0 votes
2 answers
33 views

Destroy an asteroid by EM waves by making its crystalline meshes enter in resonance?

Could we destroy an asteroid made of crystalline materials heading towards the Earth by bombarding it with electromagnetic rays, making its crystalline meshes enter in vibration resonance and ...
user avatar
30 votes
9 answers
4k views

Does amplitude really go to infinity in resonance?

I was recapping the forced oscillations, and something troubled me. The equation concerning forced oscillation is: $$ x=\frac{F_0}{m(\omega_0^2-\omega^2)}\cos(\omega t) $$ I don't understand why this ...
user avatar
1 vote
0 answers
19 views

Lateral Driven Oscillation of a bridge

I am working through a question on driven oscillations and was looking for a couple of pointers if possible. The question is regarding driven oscillations on a bridge, and we have established the ...
user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
28 views

On RF cavities in circular accelerators

Radiofequency pillbox-like cavities are used to accelerate particles, as shown here. They act grossly speaking like a LC circuit, so they are designed to work with a specific frequency. This already ...
user avatar
  • 706
1 vote
1 answer
64 views

Sound of string in a guitar

I study about waves and I learn that the velocity of a transverse wave in a string depends only on the tension and the density of the string. The frequency depends only on the source (whatever ...
user avatar
1 vote
2 answers
60 views

Quality factor of LCR circuit

If we are given a parallel or series LCR circuit, we know the quality factor of these circuits ( which we can see in many books). But if we are given a LCR circuit with the three components connected ...
user avatar
  • 11
0 votes
0 answers
17 views

Hypothetical NMR experiment

Say I set the RF of NMR to resonate to a specific frequency of a specific isotope of nitrogen, based on the magnetic field strength of the NMR machine, Now, imagine if I had put in egg whites(or any ...
user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
10 views

Calculating the Feshbach resonances between carbon atoms

From my understanding, Feshbach resonance is a scattering resonance that occurs when the energy of an atom pair coincides with the energy of a molecular bound state. Feshbach resonances are ...
user avatar
1 vote
0 answers
14 views

Transduction coefficient of an electromechanical system

I have been recently doing a physics experiment which requires me to determine the transduction coefficient of a speaker system, undergoing electromechanical resonance, in an AC circuit. The quantity ...
user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
65 views

Definition of Quality Factor $Q$

The stored energy definition of the quality factor $Q$from wiki Q-factor from wiki is given by $$ Q = 2\pi \frac{\text{energy stored}}{\text{energy dissipated per cycle}}= 2\pi f_0 \frac{\text{...
user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
33 views

Energy dissipated during cycle of damping force

Considering a drive damped oscillator after transients have died out and is being drive close to resonance such that $\omega=\omega_0$, I want to find the energy dissipated during one cycle, $\Delta ...
user avatar
1 vote
0 answers
32 views

What does it mean if a resonant particle has a zero decay width in 3-body decay?

I'm working on a problem that assumes a zero decay width for the resonance in a three-body decay with resonance, $A \rightarrow B + C (\rightarrow 1 + 2)$, and $\Gamma_{C\rightarrow 1+2} = 0$. I ...
user avatar
2 votes
2 answers
85 views

What exactly happens, step by step, in string harmonics?

I know that a string when plucked shows harmonics but I do not really understand how. Like, I understand resonating air column and how standing waves are formed there, but I can't seem to get the step ...
user avatar
6 votes
2 answers
404 views

Why does plucking a string produce harmonics instead of a pulse?

If I jerk a wire from the free end fixed at an end and then fix the free end, it will produce a pulse travelling back and forth between the two ends. So in a string fixed at both ends, if we pluck it ...
user avatar
5 votes
3 answers
445 views

Can't understand Resonance in an Air Column

In this image about resonating air column in my book, they say that resonance occurs at those specific lengths marked in the diagram. However, its also said that natural frequency of air column ...
user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
30 views

Does the lithosphere have a resonant frequency?

In meteorological sciences, there is an important concept known as the Schumann resonance, which are the integer values of electromagnetic resonance between the surface and ionosphere. The values ...
user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
35 views

Oscillations in a Time-Varying Magnetic Field

Suppose we have a cantilever (with a magnetic moment/charge attached to one of its ends) oscillating in a magnetic field which is spatially varying in the $x$ direction and is also time dependent, ...
user avatar
-2 votes
1 answer
42 views

Waves and oscillation [duplicate]

Maxima and and minima of sound wave at given time represents air density (maxima represents compression) similarly. How does these curved lines over the water surface represent variation of air ...
user avatar
1 vote
2 answers
84 views

Why is amplitude going to infinity in forced damped oscillator at resonance?

I'm trying to find the amplitude of steady state response of the following differential equation: $$\ddot{x}+2p\dot x + {\omega_0}^2x=\cos(\omega t)$$ A particular solution is $$x_p=\Re{\dfrac{e^{i\...
user avatar
  • 348
0 votes
1 answer
37 views

What is the reason that the vibrating body gradually acquires the frequency of the external periodic force in forced vibration?

When an external periodic force is applied on a vibrating body the body no longer vibrates with its own natural frequency but it gradually acquires the frequency of the applied periodic force. I don'...
user avatar
-1 votes
2 answers
39 views

Building an electric resonance machine with no battery for all frequencies at once

Suppose we have some fixed frequency and a electromagnetic wave of that frequency. I want to gather its energy over time to use it as resonance. In Feynman's lectures, he explains how to do this if we ...
user avatar
  • 267
0 votes
1 answer
79 views

Steven Weinberg says $L$ is the fundamental EM wavelength in a cubical cavity $L^3;$ not the typically asserted $2L.$

This is from Steven Weinberg's Lectures on Quantum Mechanics, 2nd Ed., page 2: For instance, for a cubical box of width $L,$ whatever boundary condition is satisfied on one face of the box must be ...
user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
21 views

Can electron paramagnetic resonance occur in the low megahertz range?

My understanding was that EPR can occur in certain energy bands (and thus at certain magnetic field strengths). Is it the case that it is limited to those energy levels and if so, is there any in the ...
user avatar
  • 323
1 vote
1 answer
57 views

Why do we hear louder sound when the source is in a resonator?

I did a simple experiment as illustrated below Basically, I used an app to let my phone produce a 393Hz sine wave sound. This is roughly the resonant frequency of a metal can. When the phone is ...
user avatar
  • 123
1 vote
1 answer
41 views

Frequency dependence of far field condition

I am analyzing accelerometer data collected at a drill rig, at the top of the drill string. The drill bit acts an acoustic source; the acoustic waves travel through the drill pipe from the bit to the ...
user avatar
  • 123
0 votes
1 answer
24 views

How can we find right resonant frequency of a structure?

Structures have infinite DOFs, so it possess infinite mode shapes. How can we find out the right resonant frequency out of the infinite resonant frequencies so that we can save our structure?
user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
84 views

What is the difference between Natural frequency and Resonant frequency? [duplicate]

I was previously under the impression that natural and resonant frequencies are the same. However, after doing some research they don't appear to be the exact same. Could someone please explain the ...
user avatar
0 votes
2 answers
51 views

Can natural frequency be produced by damped vibrations?

In my book it's written that when the tuning fork A is is struck on a rubber pad then it starts vibrating with natural frequency (though not written but if it's not vibrating with natural frequency ...
user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
46 views

How does time period of vibration of a body depends on the shape and size of a body?

My books mentions that time period of vibration of a body depends on the shape and size of a body. But it does not give any reason behind the fact. So I searched on the internet but failed to find any ...
user avatar
3 votes
1 answer
96 views

What exactly is the natural frequency of an object?

My book defines natural vibrations as: THE PERIODIC VIBRATIONS OF A BODY IN THE ABSENCE OF ANY EXTERNAL FORCE ON IT, ARE CALLED NATURAL VIBRATIONS.THE TIME PERIOD IS CALLED ITS NATURAL PERIOD AND THE ...
user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
26 views

Transient response of a driven damped oscillator to system parameter change

Imagine a damped driven mass spring system with a time-dependent damping coefficient \begin{equation} m\frac{d^2x}{dt^2} + b(t)\frac{dx}{dt} + kx = F_0 cos(wt) \end{equation} \begin{equation} b(t) = ...
user avatar
  • 67
4 votes
5 answers
404 views

Why are the resonant frequencies for displacement, velocity and acceleration different in a damped oscillator?

Consider a driven harmonic oscillator under a sinusoidal force $x''(t) + \gamma x'(t)+ \omega_0^2 x(t) = F(t)$. In the regime of light damping ($\omega_0/\gamma > 0.5$), we find resonance (maximum ...
user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
18 views

Are "resonances" we are finding all in ground states or not?

Sometimes scientists are finding new compound particles as "resonances", i.e. short living complexes of constituent particles. For example dineutron was found as resonance with lifetime of $...
user avatar
  • 1,586
3 votes
2 answers
248 views

Finding the resonance frequency for forced damped oscillations

I have a problem regarding a forced, damped harmonic oscillator, where I'm trying to find the resonance frequency. I have calculated the frequency for free oscillations as $$\omega_{free}=\sqrt{\frac{\...
user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
13 views

Field at exactly the cutoff frequency of a waveguide

What happens below or above a cutoff frequency is very well documented! I have never seen though a clear explanation (as a matter of fact no explanation) about what happens at exactly the cutoff ...
user avatar
2 votes
1 answer
37 views

Which harmonic we hear from organic pipe from all possible outcome?

I have gone through about each case of standing wave in open and closed organ pipe and understand antinode and node concepts. But i am confused that if all harmonics are possible in organ pipe, then ...
user avatar
1 vote
2 answers
85 views

Is the human singing voice different from a linear, time-invariant (LTI) system?

Typically the human voice is modelled by a linear, time-invariant (LTI) system. An LTI system cannot add any frequency components to an input signal. This is obvious from the input-output relation in ...
user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
27 views

Do alpha decays or strong-mediated decays like 'resonances' happen more slowly at colder temperatures?

At close to absolute zero, with less motion of the particles, could unstable particles that decay due to being 'pushed apart' by the electromagnetic force or the strong interaction last longer? I'm ...
user avatar
  • 3,443
0 votes
0 answers
29 views

Interference and conservation of energy in a resonator

It is known that constructive interference in one place must be compensated for by destructive interference in another. Take a simple Fabry Perot resonator for example. The interference occurring at ...
user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
50 views

Young's Modulus as a function of temperature

Is there a formula that relates Young's Modulus as a function of temperature? From Wikipedia, there is this formula in section 3.3: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Young%27s_modulus I tried my best to ...
user avatar
  • 1

1
2 3 4 5
14