Questions tagged [quantum-spin]

Fundamental characteristic property of particles which together with orbital angular momentum acts as the generator of rotations and which doesn't have a classical equivalent but is sometimes compared to and contrasted with classical intrinsic angular momentum.

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884 views

Sequential Stern-Gerlach devices - realizable experiment or teaching aid?

At least one textbook [1] uses sequential Stern-Gerlach devices to introduce to students that the components of angular momentum are incompatible observables. Viz., the $z$-up beam from a SG device ...
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2k views

What is “spin-orbit torque?”

I am trying really hard to understand the concept of spin-orbit torque. It is a new-ish discovery in the field of spintronics and has many applications for magnetic devices. The information that has ...
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1answer
839 views

Do EM waves transmit spin polarization?

Suppose you have a normal dipole antennae (transmitter and receiver) . Spin polarized current (as opposed to normal current) is sent into the transmitter, it emits an EM wave and the Receiver receives ...
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723 views

Chirality and helicity operators for the massless bispinor rep and their generalisation on arbitrary (tensor, 4-vector etc) cases

Let's have chirality projection operator $$ \hat {C}_{\pm} = \frac{1 \pm \gamma^{5}}{2}. $$ We introduce it and called it chirality, because $$ \hat {C}_{+}\psi = \begin{pmatrix} \psi_{\alpha} \\ 0 \...
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616 views

Why the spin 3/2 particle equation would violate causality?

I've recently come around the study of the so called Rarita-Schwinger equation for elementary particles of spin $3/2$. The point it the article is really short, and no book treats the topic in a very ...
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478 views

Chirality, helicity and their relationship for the massless case

Chirality can be interpreted as a property of Lorentz group - Lorentz transformation of field through representation $(s, 0)$ or representation $(0, s)$. For the massless particles one says, that ...
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217 views

Free Will Theorem question

The Kochen-Specker Theorem says, if I understand it correctly, that the results of spin measurements cannot be predetermined independent of measurement. They get to this conclusion by describing 33 ...
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178 views

About the rigour of replacing spins by hardcore Bosons

In literature one sometimes find that spins are replaced by hardcore bosons. Formally one replaces spin operators $\sigma^- \leftrightarrow a$, $\sigma^+ \leftrightarrow a^\dagger$, $\sigma_z \...
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123 views

A question about the emergence of 'spin' from relativistic QM

I know that quantum-spin is not equivalent to the spinning of a classical object about an axis passing through it, although there are some similarities. I also know that spin naturally emerges out of ...
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152 views

Why is a particles magnetic moment proportional to its spin?

the magnetic moment of a particles is given by, m=kS, where k is a constant the gyromagnetic ratio but where does this equation come from, is it just from experiments?
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1answer
121 views

How to calculate the expectation value in spin coherent state?

In Shankar, QFT and Condensed Matter, p73, it says $$\langle S,S|\vec S|SS\rangle=\vec kS,\tag{6.3}$$ $$\langle\Omega|\vec S|\Omega\rangle=S(\vec i \sin\theta \cos\phi+\vec j \sin\theta \sin\phi+\...
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51 views

How does one electron or spin see the other in a ferromagnetic material?

QM tells us that only one component of angular momentum is measurable which conventionally taken to be Lz= 1/2. The other two components have an uncertain magnitude and direction and this is usually ...
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120 views

Physical/geometrical interpretations of spinors?

Physically, a scalar is a quantity invariant with reference frame, a vector is a quantity associated with a direction, tensors are higher relationships between vectors - what are spinors? I thought I ...
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413 views

Confused by Malus Law

The well known Malus law predicts $\cos^2\theta$ for the probability of passing through a filter oriented with an angle $\theta$ w.r.t. the polarization direction of the incident photon. On the other ...
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132 views

Mathematical Rationale for Fermion and Boson Spin Representations

I am beginning with the statement that: All physical states occur as one dimensional representations of $\mathfrak{S}_n$; they are either bosonic or fermionic. Where a fermionic state of n identical ...
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242 views

Does the spin1/2 rotation operator rotate spin in real space?

in quantum mechanics, the rotation operator for spin one half is $R_{\alpha}\left(\hat{\boldsymbol{n}}\right)=\mbox{exp}\left(-i\frac{\alpha}{2}\boldsymbol{\sigma}\cdot\hat{\boldsymbol{n}}\right)$. ...
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139 views

Interpretation of inequivalent spin structures (on the circle)

I was wondering about the physical interpretation of inequivalent spin structures on a given configuration space. For simplicity, I'd be satisified by only discussing the case of the circle. There ...
4
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1answer
92 views

What physical principle determines microstates in quantum mechanics?

If we want to calculate mean magnetisation of an equilibrium two-level-system, we know that we can resolve the identity $ \mathbf{1} = \sum_i | E_i \rangle \langle E_i |$ and giving us a uniform ...
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617 views

A question in Quantum Phase Transition of Transverse Ising Model

In section 1.4 quantum Ising model of Subir Sachdev's book Quantum Phase Transitions, he discusses the quantum phase transition of transverse quantum Ising Model at zero temperature (so we just focus ...
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104 views

Anyon Lagrangian

The discussion of 2D quantum mechanics of two identical particles may be started (as written in the following article) with Lagrangian $$ L_s = \frac{\theta}{\pi} \dot{\phi} $$ where $\phi$ is ...
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419 views

What type of fields are continuous spin representations?

Continuous spin representations (infinite dimensional representations of the Lorentz group) are pretty rarely discussed, and usually not in that much mathematical details. And usually it is done in a ...
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100 views

How long does it take to a local perturbation to propagate along a quantum system?

Imagine to have a one-dimensional system in its ground state, and to apply a local perturbation at one edge of the system. How does the system evolve after being perturbed? More specifically, how ...
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64 views

Spin of an operator in supersymmetric theories

How exactly is the spin of an operator in the context of a supersymmetric theory defined? For example, in page 25 of [1], $\mathcal{N} = 2$ supersymmetry is defined to have operators $J, G^{+}, G^{-}, ...
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214 views

Spin via Change of Phase

Thinking of spin as arising from a change in the phase of a wave function: The angular momentum is defined by the change of the phase of the wave function under rotations, which may come from the ...
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116 views

How to prove that identical particles are attracted or repelled in a given spin-s interaction theory?

Let's assume that we have integer spin interaction theory (EM field, linearized gravity, arbitrary gauge spin s theory). How to prove the consequence that in interaction theory with spin $s = 2n$ two ...
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283 views

Dirac equation in curved spacetime - found second derivatives of the metric, violation of the principle of equivalence?

I am working on the Dirac equation on curved spacetime. A Foldy-Wouthuysen transformation was applied to obtain the semiclassical limit of the equation to study the dynamics of the spin of the ...
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173 views

What's the difference between exchange spin wave and magnetostatic spin wave?

So far I've heard of three kinds of spin waves Magnetostatic spin waves (MSW) Dipole-exchange spin waves (DESW) Exchange spin waves (ESW) What's the difference?
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1answer
152 views

Correct Visualization of a Spin Wave in a Ferromagnetic material

One way of describe a ferromagnetic material is the Heisenberg hamiltonian $ H = -\frac{J}{2} \sum_{<i,j>} $S$_i$S$_j$ where $J$ measures the interaction between spins (positive for ...
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55 views

Spin of skyrmion

Baryons can be considered as solitions in Skyrme model(See also this post.): Such Lagrangian haven't any information about number of colors. Bosonic or fermionic nature of baryons depends on number ...
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50 views

Detecting electron spin

Is this right?When an electron passes tnrough a detector it starts precessing but no matter of the first electrom spin orientation the highest spin magnitude is detected.In that case I am confused... ...
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144 views

How can we interpret the components of a polarization four-vector?

The four components of a Dirac spinor can be interpreted in terms of left-chiral and right-chiral spin up and spin down states. How can we interpret the four components of a polarization four vector $...
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93 views

Why can a renormalizable quantum field theory only include spin 0, 1/2 and 1 fields?

Hitoshi Murayama writes in his 221A Lecture Notes on Spin How do we choose spin when you introduce a field, then? A consistent ( i.e. , renormalizable) quantum field theory can include only spin 0, ...
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41 views

I can't find the Einstein relation for spin diffusivity

I'm studying the article "Thermodynamic analysis of interfacial transport and of the thermomagnetoelectric system" (PhysRevB.35.4959, Mark Johnson and R. H. Silsbee); they use this relation $$ D=\frac{...
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454 views

Why does the neutron have spin 1/2 and not 3/2?

The neutron is thought to consist of three tightly bound quarks, each with spin 1/2. Simple addition of angular momentum would tell us that the resulting system (neutron) could have either spin 1/2 or ...
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1answer
67 views

Weyssenhoff fluid and Frenkel condition

A Weyssenhoff fluid is a continuos fluid with spin. The spin is described by an antisimmetric tensor $s{_{ab}}=s{_{[ab]}}$ satisfying the Frenkel condition \begin{equation} s{_{ab}}u{^b}=0 \end{...
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64 views

How similar are the spin states and the matter/antimatter states?

Within the Dirac formalism, we have bispinors that represent both if a particle is spin up or spin down, and if a particle is an electron or a positron. And these representations are very similar. (...
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404 views

What is the relation between the Holstein-Primakoff Transformation and Bethe's Ansatz for the Heisenberg Ferromagnet?

Bethe's Ansatz is a method to find the eigenenergies and eigenstates of the Heisenberg ferromagnet (see also spin waves). For a general n-excitation state it involves solving rather complicated ...
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122 views

Does this physical situation distinguish whether you are viewing it a mirror?

The weak interaction's lack of $P$-symmetry is often explained by saying that "the amplitudes for processes involving the weak interaction are different from the amplitudes for the same processes ...
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544 views

What is a soft photon?

I accidentally came across the words "soft photon" today after reading a few blogs. There was some discussion of special situations involving gauge redundancies and a theorem by Weinberg. What is a ...
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49 views

How does the electromagnetic field of an electron and a rotating ball of charge behave in a co-rotating reference frame?

First time poster, hope I'm not breaking any rules. Basically I'm curious about how far the classical analogy of an electron as a rotating ball of charge can be stretched. The situation I'm ...
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104 views

How is Spin experimentally determined?

I know what spin is and how theories determine it for particles. What I don't understand yet, is how people, through experiments and data analysis or whatever, reach to confirm/say that the $X$ ...
3
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1answer
124 views

In what circumstances, can exchange interaction acquire temperature dependence?

Heisenberg exchange interaction (sometimes called as magnetic stiffness?), originating from the Coulomb interaction and the Fermion statistics, is widely used in theories of magnetism. Conventionally, ...
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607 views

Transfer from Heisenberg to Ising model

It is well know, that ferromagnets can be described using Hamiltonian $$ H = -\sum\limits_{i<j}J_{ij}\, (\mathbf{s}_i \cdot \mathbf{s}_j). $$ where (three dimensional) spins $\mathbf{s}_i$ ...
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598 views

The Heisenberg Uncertainty in Bose Einstein condensates

What happens to the Heisenberg uncertainty principle, when a system reaches the Bose-Einstein condensed state? In our statistical mechanics lecture, we derived the following formula for the fraction ...
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84 views

Would CP Violation happen in a universe with four spatial dimensions?

The weak force is the force that violates CP symmetry as the way it effects a particle depends on that particles handedness. Particles have a property known as spin although it is different from ...
3
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1answer
322 views

Interpretation of the electromagnetic field strength tensor as a spin-1 field

If I understand correctly the electromagnetic field strength tensor $ F_{\mu\nu}$ could be considered as a spin-1 field. In that case, what can one say about the total spin and the $z$-component of ...
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0answers
724 views

Spin 1/2 wavefunction transformation under inversion and mirror symmetry

I'm considering group-theory applications to condensed matter physics now. In particular I work with the following paper: http://journals.aps.org/pr/pdf/10.1103/PhysRev.100.580 and try to understand ...
3
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0answers
582 views

Attraction and repulsion of electron spin ups and electron spin downs

Alright, we know that copper is a diamagnetic material, which has paired electrons. These paired electrons have different spin. I'm specifically interested in what is going on with the electrons in a ...
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228 views

What are the assumptions behind “term symbols”?

In multi-electron atoms, the electronic state of the optically active "subshell" is often expressed in "term symbols" notation. I.e. $^{2S+1}L_J$. This presumes that the system of electrons has ...
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378 views

Reducing massive representation of the Poincare group to the massless one

I want to ask about the connection for massive and massless representation of the Poincare group. Sorry for the awkwardness. First I must to represent the formalism for both of cases. Massive ...

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