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Questions tagged [quantum-interpretations]

This tag is for questions relating to what, if anything, the quantum mechanical formalism and experimental results say about the way the world works.

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Is Schrodinger's cat a problem of how we define identity?

I apologize if the question is somehow silly or useless. I was reading about the infamous Schrödinger's cat paradox and I thought that if we consider that a cat is composed of numerous atomic ...
Marco Fabbri's user avatar
-2 votes
1 answer
82 views

Quantum collapse: our invention? [closed]

I'm wondering if a similar scenario has already been proposed, or if this one is somehow valid. I'm a complete layman so be patient.My reasoning goes like this: is the collapse of the wave function a ...
Marco Fabbri's user avatar
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1 answer
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Importance of Environment in System-Observer Entanglement and Decoherence

It has been stated in places such as Sean Carroll's talks that including the environment in our description of a quantum measurement process is important in understanding why we do not "feel like&...
tomdodd4598's user avatar
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0 answers
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Transactional interpretation of quantum mechanics, again

Up to now, I appreciated various interpretations of quantum mechanics, namely, the Copenhagen interpretation, the many-worlds interpretation, the decoherence interpretation, and the Bohm's pilot wave. ...
Doriano Brogioli's user avatar
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How is information defined when considering locality in quantum mechanics?

$\newcommand{\ket}[1]{|#1\rangle}$ My question is a follow-up from this discussion about the presence of non-local correlations in a theory that is deemed local. The first answer talks about the ...
UVcatastrophe's user avatar
2 votes
4 answers
206 views

Why are wavefunctions not considered hidden variables?

In the proof of Bell's theorem of 1964, referenced e.g. here, the definition of a hidden variable seems to be any variable from which we can derive the correlation between the detectors, by ...
Davyz2's user avatar
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4 answers
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How is "Many Worlds" supposed to work?

Let's say Anne and Bob are spacelike separated and we carry out the usual entangled photons experiment. Each has a polarising analyser and the entangled photons are prepared in such a way that they ...
KDP's user avatar
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2 votes
1 answer
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Feynman diagrams in string theory

I am beginning to study string theory, I have a beginner level doubt: If we consider a Feynman torus diagram in string theory, it is a worldsheet. What does it represent? Does it actually mean that in ...
SX849's user avatar
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6 answers
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How are quantum systems different from dice?

I've had this question for a while: Is a state space $\mathcal{H}$ for a quantum system just a sample space in a probability space? The question arises because i can't really tell a difference between ...
Simón Flavio Ibañez's user avatar
5 votes
4 answers
222 views

Is there a resolution to the "Wigner's Friend" paradox?

Suppose that two observers $A$ and $B$ are mutually isolated, observer $A$ measures the state $|0\rangle + |1\rangle$ and concludes that the result is $|0\rangle$. However, observer $B$ concludes that ...
Davyz2's user avatar
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QBism makes perfect sense, but what about the rest of the world?

As I understand it, QBism is an epistemological interpretation of quantum mechanics, much like the Copenhagen interpretation. The state of a quantum system, described by a wave function, is not ...
Arman Armenpress's user avatar
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1 answer
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Wavefunction with determinate momentum

In page 100 Griffiths' Introduction to Quantum Mechanics, Griffiths states that the eigenvector of $\hat{p}$ in the position basis is $\frac{1}{\sqrt {2\pi\hbar}}e^{\frac{ipx}{\hbar}}$ and states that ...
xyz1234's user avatar
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1 answer
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Did "mangled worlds" go anywhere?

"Mangled worlds" is an idea from Robin Hansen that attempts to explain the origin of the Born rule. AIUI, it asserts that interpreted as in MWI, decoherence of a superposition as a result of ...
redroid's user avatar
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The role of probability in the many-worlds interpretation [duplicate]

A quantum system can transition to one of two states, with probabilities 30% and 70%. The many worlds interpretation says that the universe splits into two, one for each state. If so, what do the 30% ...
Maurice Mizrahi's user avatar
2 votes
1 answer
77 views

How does decoherence work in Everettian quantum mechanics when the observer has a limited amount of memory? [closed]

First of all, please forgive me for the confusing way I'm asking this question, I'm not quite sure how to articulate it aside from an unrealistic thought experiment. I'm trying to understand how ...
Taylor Hornby's user avatar
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1 answer
103 views

In Bohmian Mechanics, are non-local influences travelling through a medium?

In Bohmian Mechanics, there is an explicit notion of non-locality where one measurement outcome affects the other in quantum entanglement. In the theory, is this influence traveling through some ...
user avatar
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Is there a name for Bohmian pilot wave theory with an ensemble of jockey particles?

In Bohmian QM, the wave function $\psi$ is moving a classical point particle around. Without effort, it could also move a large ensemble of particles (since there is no back reaction). Is there a name ...
Jos Bergervoet's user avatar
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1 answer
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Is Schrodinger's cat a bad analogy? [closed]

I have decided to completely revamp and simplify this question in the light of the down votes. The question is simple. What is it about Schrondinger's cat thought experiment, that demonstrates the cat ...
KDP's user avatar
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1 vote
4 answers
213 views

All the logically possible ways to get around Bell-type inequalities

I'm a high school student, so my (mis)understanding here is not very rigorous or precise, but I will write it below so as to concretely frame my question: Bell's theorem takes three assumptions ...
user110391's user avatar
3 votes
4 answers
170 views

Are the postulates of QM independent of interpretation, or based on Copenhagen?

In particular, I'm talking about the measurement postulate (or at least part of it, I have seen different formulations, here there's one), in which, after measurement of an observable $A$ with ...
agaminon's user avatar
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3 answers
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Basic doubt in quantum mechanics

Do entities like electrons, which are considered point particles in Classical Mechanics, actually have a definite position at a particular time (irrespective of it can be measured or not)?
Users's user avatar
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4 answers
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Does Bell’s theorem rule out changing hidden variables?

In the EPR experiment, it is said that there are predictions that are made if there are hidden variables determined by something locally in each particle that results in a correlation in entanglement. ...
Alejandro's user avatar
-4 votes
1 answer
185 views

Can many-worlds be testable, if considered in the context of reality as we know it? [closed]

This question concerns Hugh Everett's many worlds interpretation of quantum mechanics. If we consider many-worlds within the context of the conscious beings that already exist in this world, then ...
DanielFBest's user avatar
4 votes
4 answers
1k views

Do Bell’s inequalities assume determinism?

I was watching a video of Tim Maudlin where he talks about how the CHSH version of Bell’s inequalities do not assume determinism and only assume locality. He said that it is a common misconception ...
inquisitive 's user avatar
3 votes
4 answers
213 views

Does QM recognise empty waves?

If a particle (photon) goes through a Mach-Zehnder interferometer it is accepted in quantum mechanics texts that in passes in both channels after first beam splitter BS1 and propagates there until BS2....
Mercury's user avatar
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2 answers
241 views

Many-Worlds Interpretation: What Ensures Every Physically Possible Scenario is Actualized in Some Parallel Universe?

In the Many-Worlds Interpretation of the Mach-Zehnder Interferometer experiment, one interprets the universe as splitting into two, with photons traveling in different directions in each universe. ...
Tarun Gupta's user avatar
0 votes
3 answers
191 views

How do non-local correlations occur in QM without a cause? [closed]

The Copenhagen interpretation of QM ultimately amounts to asserting that non-local correlations occur without a cause since that cause would involve propagation of information faster than the speed ...
user avatar
2 votes
2 answers
124 views

Dictionary between interpretations of field operators

For now, let $\hat{\phi}(x)$ be a quantization of a classical, real scalar field $\phi(x)$. My understanding is that, for fixed $x$, there are three ways to regard the operator $\hat{\phi}(x)$: The ...
JustLikeNumberTheory's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
54 views

Interpretation of nodes of infinite square well

In the infinite square well, there is zero probability of finding a particle at nodes. What is the meaning of this result? Does the particle teleport in the regions between the nodes? Or is it that ...
GedankenExperimentalist's user avatar
2 votes
1 answer
105 views

Relationship of the do-operator in do calculus and the notion of the collapse of wave a function

I stumbled over the "do calculus" in causal modeling https://arxiv.org/abs/1210.4852 and the do-operator which is defined in this post https://stats.stackexchange.com/a/643333/298651 The do-...
7 votes
1 answer
663 views

What happens to branching in the Many-Worlds Interpretation of quantum mechanics in the limit when Planck's constant goes to 0?

We learn from quantum mechanics courses that one recovers classical mechanics in the limit when Planck's constant goes to zero. This can be seen in the path integral formulation. This is why ...
Guillaume Laporte's user avatar
2 votes
2 answers
60 views

Why is it that we cannot detect any interference after decoherence?

If we assume the many-worlds interpretation of quantum physics is true, what exactly happens during decoherence, that makes it impossible for the different worlds to create interference with each ...
christian's user avatar
0 votes
3 answers
128 views

What happens if two people have different knowledge about a state in a quantum mechanical system?

Let’s say I measure the spin of an electron, but I don’t tell you what it is and you don’t measure it yourself. Does that change the wave function for you or does it remain the same either way? If it ...
Name's user avatar
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1 vote
1 answer
113 views

The Heisenberg Uncertainty Principle (HUP) and "borrowing energy" [duplicate]

Often when physics students are introduced to the HUP for position and momentum, the interpretation is that you aren't able to measure position and momentum for a particle to arbitrary precision at ...
Depenau's user avatar
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2 votes
0 answers
69 views

How does pilot wave theory explain non-zero momentum measurements? [closed]

The momentum of particles in pilot wave theory is dependent on the phase of the spatial wave function, which is 0 for stationary states. This means that electrons in all excited stationary states of a ...
user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
123 views

Does a Quantum System Really "Jump" to an Eigenstate When Observed?

Warning: This is a highly hypothetical question. I am bothered with Dirac's description of the system when making a measurement. Without quoting his statement (from The Principles of Quantum Mechanics,...
Con's user avatar
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0 votes
1 answer
86 views

What interpretations are ruled out by the Kochen–Specker theorem?

What interpretations are ruled out by this theorem (such as superdeterminism, Bohmian mechanics, or ensemble interpretations) and does it function similarly to Bell's theorem as a 'no-go' theorem?
Marco Fabbri's user avatar
2 votes
1 answer
131 views

Can Leggett-Garg inequality be used to falsify realist interpretations of quantum mechanics?

Can Leggett-Garg inequality be used to falsify superdeterminism, Bohmian mechanics and other realist interpretations of quantum mechanics? https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Leggett_inequality https://en....
Marco Fabbri's user avatar
1 vote
0 answers
35 views

Concerning paths of particles and quantum mechanics [duplicate]

It is well know that scientific tools , eg bubble chamber, can keep track of particle trajectories. Now here is my doubt. Quantum mechanics, which is a statistical theory, says that trajectories do ...
Vittorio Foglietti's user avatar
5 votes
4 answers
829 views

Exact time evolution of Stern-Gerlach (SG) apparatus

Background: I was always under the impression that when considering the Stern-Gerlach (SG) Experiment, the interpretation of the split of the beams is that the spin $1/2$ particle get measured the ...
2000mg Haigo 's user avatar
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0 answers
39 views

Are there testable predictions made by the Copenhagen interpretation that are incompatible with Pilot Wave or vice versa? [duplicate]

As of right now, whenever right now happens to be, has anyone identified any promising experiments capable of distinguishing between the Copenhagen interpretation and the Pilot Wave interpretation of ...
Him's user avatar
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4 votes
1 answer
142 views

Understanding Wigner’s friend scenario

I recently watched this video https://youtu.be/Wsjgtp9XZxo?si=sIRlAbvAm2wjXRNP and tried (unsuccessfully, because i don’t have the knowledge required) to read Bruckner’s paper. What i am missing, is ...
Marco Fabbri's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
81 views

Why does linearity imply no communication between Everettian worlds?

Scott Aaronson said in this interview https://youtu.be/1ZpGCQoL2Rk?t=3255 that the linearity of Schrodinger's equation prevents us from communicating with other Everettian worlds. Why? Is it analogous ...
ngc1300's user avatar
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1 vote
0 answers
35 views

Interpretation of density wave observables

Given some Hamiltonian quantum system, one can ask questions about (expectation values of) observables. While some have an intuitive meaning, e.g. energy or magnetisation, I find it hard to grasp the ...
qising's user avatar
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2 votes
1 answer
84 views

Does a particle still behave as a wave after being detected as a particle?

I just started learning about the intricacies of quantum mechanics in high school and aim to improve my understanding of the wave-particle duality of particles. I was wondering about different ...
spaghettyii's user avatar
1 vote
2 answers
217 views

How can the Copenhagen and Everett interpretations of quantum mechanics make the same predictions?

Suppose we have a spin $\frac{1}{2}$ particle in the spin-up state along the $z$-axis, $\lvert \uparrow \rangle$, and after $t$ seconds of evolution under the Schrodinger equation it is in state $\...
MBar2269's user avatar
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0 votes
2 answers
234 views

What is the consensus among physicists on whether quantum mechanics has non-locality? [closed]

According to this article here by the SEP, Following Bell's work, a broad consensus has it that the quantum realm involves some type of non-locality (for examples, see Clauser and Horne 1974, Jarrett ...
user avatar
-4 votes
2 answers
110 views

Does a quantum measurement change the state in the past? [closed]

Consider the following very basic quantum mechanics experiment. At time $t_0$, a system $S$ is in superposition of two orthogonal states $|A\rangle$ and $|B\rangle$, which we could describe by $\frac{...
Riemann's user avatar
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15 votes
9 answers
5k views

What experimental proof of quantum superposition do we have?

My question is both naive and subtle. Naive because I don't know much more than the layman about physics and in particular quantum physics. Subtle because physics is an attempt to model the world, ...
b_habegger's user avatar
0 votes
3 answers
153 views

Can there be a local hidden variable theory that works differently for each electron in an entangled pair?

I recently watched a video from Brian Greene that goes over an example of Bell’s inequality. Video here. In this example, he imagines the generation of a pair of entangled particles, each of which is ...
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