Questions tagged [photoelectric-effect]

The observed behavior in which light falling on certain metals can eject electrons from the surface.

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What is the refractive index of an electron?

Consider a free electron or electron bunch, would it have a corresponding refractive index? At low or high energies, the effects are obviously much different. I am curious to know (I haven't found) ...
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Planck's constant calculated by photoelectric effect laboratory is off

I conducted an experiment today where I had to use a photocathode of unknown material (model: Daedalon Corporation Photoelectric Effect EP-05) and study the photoelectric (PE) effect to make a ...
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How to interpret the UPS spectrum of quantum dots?

I have been using the ultraviolet photoemission spectroscopy (UPS) to look at the energy levels of quantum dots. My quantum dot has a core/shell structure, where the shell is supposed to have a larger ...
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144 views

How to distinguish Shake-Up Satellites from Plasmons?

I am studying XPS spectra (X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy) at the moment. In XPS, different processes can influence the final state energy of detected electrons. One of these processes is the ...
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Relativistic photoelectric effect

Suppose, one conducted an experiment with a monochromatic light shining on a metal plate with a certain work function. It turns out the electron is ejected. When this experiment is observed by another ...
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75 views

Increasing potential beyond saturation current in photoelectric effect

After reading several posts and sources online, I think I finally understand the saturation current: at the saturation current, all of the electrons being emitted due to the incident light are being ...
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172 views

In Einstein's Photo Electric Effect, variation of frequency while keeping Intensity constant

In photoelectric effect, the intensity of light is directly related to the number of photons incident on metal. This is indicated by the photocurrent vs. voltage applied for different frequencies ...
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1answer
347 views

What happens when a lower energy photon strikes a higher energy atom?

I understand that when a higher energy photon hits an atom it could elevate an electron and add energy to the atom, but what happens if a lower energy photon strikes a higher energy atom? If it doesn'...
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2answers
198 views

Compton effect in photo-electric?

In photo-electric effect Einstein said that photons incidents on material and gives their energy which will gives kinetic energy to electrons. But i also want to know that why Compton's effect not ...
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20 views

Does quantum efficiency of solar cells vary with irradiance?

I want to know if a solar cell exposed to high irradiance (perhaps artificial light) of say 1500 w/m2 would suffer reduced QE. For the sake of the question lets assume the solar cell is in an ...
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21 views

Geometry of the electrodes in experiments on the photoelectric effect

My school uses a commercial apparatus for freshman student labs on the photoelectric effect, but the documentation, written for students, is at a very basic level and seems to oversimplify or not ...
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51 views

Photoelectric effect - the reason for exponential graphs and a misconception about the concept of intensity

We have this basic PASCO Photoelectric Effect equipment in our lab and there are two things I would like to ask about the experiment. We keep either the area apertures or wavelength filters fixed and ...
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36 views

Photo-electric effect with light reflected from a blue wall

Suppose we have a metal which has a work function corresponding to yellow. Obviously, if light with frequency greater than yello is made to fall on it, it would show photo-electric effect.Now, ...
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1answer
88 views

Number of photons in range of frequencies

I was trying to calculate the number of photons emitted by a light of constant power $P$ between frequencies $\nu_1$ and $\nu_2$. I have already checked this question but the reply marked as correct ...
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24 views

Extraction energy of an elecrron

Is the extraction energy of an electron out of a metal the same in a neutral metal and the same metal negatively charged ? If not what is the difference between these two energies ? In the ...
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45 views

photoelectric effect when the plate is moving

Consider a plate that is moving away from the light source with respect to the ground and the frequency of the light is equal to the threshold frequency. Now if we observe the same experiment from a ...
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46 views

Why is the photoionization cross section smaller at higher photon energies?

I read that the photoionization of a ground state hydrogen atom for photon energies $h\nu > I_H$ (where $I_H$ is the ionization energy of $H$ at $13.6 \, \mathrm{eV}$ has a smaller cross section ...
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1answer
121 views

What does it mean if the resistance of a semiconductor increases due to light?

I have synthesized an $n$-type semiconductor material $\text{ZnO}$. Under light illumination, its resistance keeps increasing. What are the reasons for this?
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58 views

What is the term for the light-sensitive metals in the photoelectric effect?

Can anyone please tell me the term used to refer to metals such as those used in photoelectric effect which can generate a current from light?
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55 views

How does Einstein's oscillatory & quantum structure of radiation from 1909 relate to modern physics

In his 1909 lecture The Development of Our Views on the Composition and Essence of Radiation Einstein discusses two structures of "radiation": As far as I know, no mathematical theory has been ...
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67 views

Measuring time in the photoelectric effect

Consider the following hypothetical: An atom is traveling with a velocity of v to the left, directly towards an incoming photon, as crudely depicted below. p----> <----A Question (1): What is ...
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principle about SPAD for ToF ranging module from ST

My colleagues are using VL53L0 from ST which is one ToF ranging module. I am trying to understand the principle about the SPAD(single-photon avalanche diode) and have read many materials on it. From ...
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86 views

Why do we use ring shaped anode in photoelectric effect?

We used a ring shaped anode and photons produced by Mercury arc lamp directed toward the anode and strike on cathode surface. But why did not we just let the photons directly strike to the cathode? ...
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129 views

Frequencies emitted when electron falls back to lower energy state

Does an excited electron fall straight back to ground state like a quantum jump or does it go through the intermediate states which would result in different frequencies of photons being emitted lets ...
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33 views

Atomic selection rules and relativistic selection rules difference?

I spent my last few weeks trying to figure out the difference between atomic and relativistic selection rules in photoelectron spectroscopy. I understand the fact that non-relativistic selection ...
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337 views

What increases the resistance at collector in photoelectric effect?

The photoelectric experiment uses a setup like this: The graph of photoelectric current $I$ against potential applied at the anode/collecting plate $V$ looks something like this: Once we reach the ...
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1answer
81 views

Calculating wavelenght of an accelerated electron

The rest mass of the relativistic electron is $m$, what's the electron's wavelength if it gets accelerated by a potential difference $U$. Is it right to use dee Broglie equation for wavelength, ...
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149 views

Photoelectric Effect - Effect of light intensity and frequency on current saturation

My book gives a question that what'll happen when both the frequency and intensity of a light source is doubled? I think that current saturation should increase on increasing intensity of light ...
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486 views

Current in photoelectric effect

In the first lecture about photoelectric effect in my physics course my teacher proposed this device: Then he started to say why photoelectric was not classical and made this statements: 1) ...
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60 views

Is measuring the speed of light using energy and wavelength cyclical?

I would like to measure the speed of light by directly measuring the frequency and wavelength of a light source. In order to determine the wavelength, I wanted to use a diffraction grating and the ...
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183 views

Database for work functions for exotic crystallographic faces

Is there a database, which holds work functions (found either from experiment or calculations) for some more exotic crystallographic faces, such as (221) or (311) for copper? I dug around and found ...
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465 views

Calculating saturation current and energy associated with a band of wavelengths

Consider white light whose wavelength spread is from $400nm$ to $700nm$. Its energy is uniformly distributed in this spectrum. The light is incident on metal A of work function $1.55eV$. ...
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130 views

Why call it a particle and not a wave pulse?

My physics textbook says that photoelectric emission provides conclusive evidence for the particle theory of light. Apparently, since photoelectric emission only works at certain frequencies, we can ...
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69 views

How much energy does a PV cell need to work?

How much energy does a $1m^2$ photovolatic/solar cell need to work? Can it work using a bunch of Laser lights? Edit: Ok so this PV cell is $1m^2$ is dimesions. The N-type has silicon doped with ...
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443 views

Continuum Wave Function for the electron

I'm trying to understand certain processes like the photoelectric effect and Bremsstrahlung. In Bremsstrahlung I need to use the wave function of an electron coming from the continuum, and there is ...
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Intensity of light that produces largest current in Photoelectric Effect + Stopping Voltage Question

For the first image: For the Sodium metal, the Current produced by the cell is the highest when shined on by 196nm light - Not the highest, why is that? What determines the intensity of the light that ...
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An electron is subjected to an electromagnetic field using the canonical equations solve

So I was given the following vector field: $\vec{A}(t)=\{A_{0x}cos(\omega t + \phi_x), A_{0y}cos(\omega t + \phi_y), A_{0z}cos(\omega t + \phi_z)\}$ Where the amplitudes $A_{0i}$ and phase shifts \...
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1answer
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Covariant relativistic photoelectric effect

General textbooks introduce the photoelectric effect as the Einstein's formula $$hf=hf_0+E_c(max)$$ and where $E_c=mv^2_e/2$ is the kinetic energy maximum value, the work function is $eV_0=hf_0$, and ...
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1answer
46 views

What happens to the extra energy when the photon hits an electron? (+ Compton's Effect)

I understand that the electron needs a specific quantized amount of energy in order to be excited to another state. For example, hydrogen requires $10.2\ \mathrm{eV}$ for its electron to jump from $n=...
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Relation between current (not at saturation) and voltage in photoelectric effect

This is the question I got for an assignment. How do I determine stopping potential from this data? I can see that the relation between $V$ and $I$ seems to be linear, so can I just use the equation ...
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1answer
34 views

Is the direction of momentum important in photoelectric effect?

I was wondering that does the momentum (direction also) of emitted electron depend on absurbed photon or not? I couldn't find much explanation on internet about it. They show like the emission of ...
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1answer
60 views

Is photocell current equal zero at threshold frequency?

In photocell is there currant at threshold frequency $f=f_o$? I mean $I=0$ at $f=f_o$?
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1answer
44 views

KE in photoelectric effect

I photoelectric effect when a single photon's energy is absorbed, why don't all get the same Max $KE$. Because for an electron, there can be no loss in heat or any friction and all. Why do most of the ...
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1answer
29 views

Electrical neutrality in photoelectric effect

In photo electric effect ,if electrons escape, shouldn't that leave the metal positively charged ??. How does it maintain its electrical neutrality ? And if it doesn't , shouldn't the work function ...
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Energy in photoelectric effect

When a monochromatic light hits a surface there are two possible scenarios. First energy of the light is greater or equal to work function and second energy of light is smaller than work function. In ...
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Will an electron move in a photoelectric effect apparatus if the electrodes have 0 potential difference?

So I was reviewing for my test but I was struck by this question and it has been bothering me ever since. What if I have 0 potential difference between the electrodes in a photoelectric effect ...
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2answers
23 views

photoelectric effect and Quantized energy state

I know that the energy state electron is quantized. for example if n1's energy is 1 and n2's energy is 3 electron only absorbs 2 energy. it never absorbs 1 or 2.5 energy. but i learned that if the ...
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What if potential difference is 0 in photoelectric effect. And what would happen as it goes negative

I'm confused as to why potential difference in itself is not sufficient to move electrons and there is a certain kinetic energy required to move the electron
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Photoelectric effect and emission

How would I calculate the number of electrons emitted from say a given intensity of light. For instance number of electrons emitted per unit time interval (second) in a $\text{mm}^2$ metal surface? ...
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What happens when a photon hits a particle (radiative heat transfer, photoelectric effect)?

By relating temperature to particle motion, the kinetic theory of gases gives an intuitive explanation of conductive heat transfer; faster particles collide with slower ones to transfer kinetic energy....