Questions tagged [photoelectric-effect]

The observed behavior in which light falling on certain metals can eject electrons from the surface.

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Why is light with higher frequency more destructive, if it emits the same amount of electrons?

The Photoelectric effect states that if light with high enough frequency hits some matter, that matter will emit electrons. If you increase the intensity of light, more electrons will be emitted, but ...
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Basics of photoelectric effect

DISCLAIMER: I have not yet fully entered into the vast field of quantum mechanics and and was reading about the photoelectric effect as a part of chemistry, however I feel, the topic of structure of ...
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Beam of electrons used in photoelectric effect [closed]

The question is as follows So here they have replaced beam of light by beam of electrons so clearly instead of photon absorption there will be energy transfer from electrons to photoelectron by ...
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Photoelectric emission at frequency less then threshold frequency

If I shine an EM radiation of frequency $\nu$ on a metal surface which has threshold frequency of $\nu_o$, where $\nu < \nu_o$ then, will the emission occur by multi photon absorption? My reasoning ...
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Effect of Intensity on photocurrent

If, $I=\frac{nh\nu}{/at}$, why does photocurrent does not increase on increasing frequency? If same intensity and different frequency radiation is used, shouldn't $n_1\nu_1=n_2\nu_2$ hold true? [since ...
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Why photocurrent is different at 0 potential with varying frequency?

The problem Here in this graph when the potential is 0 photocurrent is different for different frequencies from what I understand frequency shouldn't affect the amount of photocurrent and yet it is ...
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What is the difference between photoelectric effect and photo-ionization?

Photoionization, ionization by a photon, and the photoelectric effect aren't they identical? If not then what is the phenomenological difference between them?
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Doubt on photoelectric effect

One failure of wave nature of light in photoelectric effect was that increasing the intensity of light did not increase the kinetic energy of electrons. I don't understand how this is true. We know ...
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Reducing the filament voltage has no effect on the maximum photon energy produced by characteristic or Bremsstrahlung radiation. TRUE - why?

I'm studying for my radiology exams and I don't understand the answer to this question. It states that the following sentence is true: Reducing the filament voltage has no effect on the maximum ...
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Does the Carnot efficiency apply to photoelectric conversion?

If you consider a black body as energy source and photoelectric conversion at room temperature as the energy receiver. Wouldn't it be possible to: use an ideal prism/diffraction grating to separate ...
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Does the Work Function have any effect on the Current of a Photoelectric Circuit?

I understand that varying the work function (while staying above the threshold energy) only effects the maximum kinetic energy of the photoelectrons, which in itself would not make a difference to the ...
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Why photocurrent doesnt increase after saturation limit in Photoelectric effect on increasing Voltage

As per what i learn that current(i) is rate at which charge flow through a cross section. Let assume we have 10 balls and it reaches another end while passing through some cross section, if 10 balls ...
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Does, and if so, why does the frequency of light and wavelength of light affect the photoelectric current?

It makes sense that intensity of light affects the photoelectric current, but what about the frequency and wavelength, given that intensity remains constant? The formula for intensity would be I = nhf/...
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How are photons arranged in a light ray?

Title, or more specifically, if a constant light source is directed onto a flat surface, would the photons spread equally on said surface? In addition, say, at the beginning, 10 photons reached the ...
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Relation of frequency of light and photocurrent in Photo-electric effect

As we know that the frequency of incident light is postulated to have no effect on the photocurrent. But coming to think about both quantities should be related. Consider the formula- ...
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What is the formula for photo electric current?

I am looking for formulas equivalent to Richardson's law and Child's law ( space charge limited emission). What I want to know is, how much current would I get for given material, voltage, frequency ...
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How does the spot size of light change the photocurrent?

I want to understand the photo electric effect. If I shine light at a surface then a photon can knock an electron off the surface if its energy $h\nu$ is larger than some minimum material specific ...
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Cannot a second photon strike the electron that has been excited by the first?

Suppose during the photoelectric effect experiment, an electron gets hit by a photon whose frequency is less the threshold frequency of the metallic surface. It will get excited, but we know that it ...
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Is there a material with work function less than 1 eV?

There are lots of problems related to photoelectric effect, which, for example, use, or have as answer, a work function of less than 1 eV. But when I search on Google, I found out that most metals ...
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How can a photon be partially absorbed an electron? [duplicate]

I am familiar that the there is a similar question , but elaborating my question " In the photoelectric effect the electron absorbs only a part of the photon 's energy which is needed for ...
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Why photoelectric effect proves particle nature?

If a giant water wave can change the altitude of a boat, then why can't electron's position be changed by waves. Afterall waves can make a ball rise and fall thus imparting energy to it.
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In a photoelectric cell, how come the electrons don't move to the higher potential through the vacuum without the need of an incident light?

I have been reading about the photoelectric effect and I have arrived at the photoelectric cell. Knowing that the air is removed from inside the cell, and assuming there's no incident light. How come ...
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How is depletion region of the negatively biased photodiode is re-filled with electrons?

We were taught that the photons' energy rips off the electrons away from their orbits in the atoms residing inside the depletion region of a negatively biased photodetector. My naive understanding is ...
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Radiation pressure and photon momentum

From classical electromagnetism we know that the electromagnetic field carries momentum, which is related to energy density of the field and in particular can be transferred to a particle via ...
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Why dosen't electrons loose energy in photoelectric experiments?

I was studying experiment on photoelectric effect. It was about effect of light intensity, frequency, potential etc. on photocurrent and KE of the ejected electrons (referring to the below setup). The ...
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Can you electrostatically charge materials with X-rays?

I am wondering if by making use of the photoelectric effect someone using for example X-rays radiation could electrostatically charge positively a dielectric like glass [1] and make it therefore ...
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Possibility of combining photovoltaics and solar thermal energy

In a private setting, photovoltaics and solar thermal energy are often harvested on the home's roof and roof area is limited. So, I thought about combining both, i.e. mounting solar collectors ...
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Some confusion about photoelectric effect [closed]

In photoelectric effect, we give negative voltage to stop the flow of electrons, but I don't understand what negative potential is and in which direction it is applied. Recently, I have performed the ...
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Photoelectric effect in hydrogen: evaluating the matrix element integral

I'm following page 503 of Shankar's Principle of Quantum Mechanics. The author is discussing the photoelectric effect and transition from the hydrogen ground state to a plane wave. Applying the ...
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How does moving an electron to a higher level actually work?

I understand the photoelectric effect and I assumed until an hour ago that to excite an electron, the photon should have energy equal to the binding energy of the initial level plus the binding energy ...
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Photoelectric effect and wave nature of light [duplicate]

We know that when a light of specific frequency is collided on the silicon metal plate electron released from it, this is the photoelectric effect This effect proves the particle nature of light , but ...
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Photoelectric effect for a positively charged plate in vacuum

In the link below, to demonstrate photoelectric effect, an electroscope is positively charged, then a UV light is shed on the top plate of the electroscope which causes the repelling force of the gold ...
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Is the threshold frequency for the photoelectric effect related to the mass of the electron?

I'm going to prefix this by saying that (a) physics is not my strong point and (b) I'm aware this is probably a coincidence. I learnt that the threshold frequency for the photoelectric effect is $\...
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The main charge carrier in the ionic crystal is polaron or conduction band electron?

Suppose I have a perfect crystal(e.g.TiO2-Rutile, band gap=3ev), under UV light, there should photoconductivity, according to the condensed matter theory, some of these excited conduction band ...
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Photoelectric effect and energy levels

The photoelectric effect is defined to strip electrons from a surface by high-frequency photons, independent of the intensity of the photons. However, each atom has electron orbitals that represent ...
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Do discharge tubes use thermionic emissions?

I've seen two separate reasons given for why electrons are released from the cathode in a discharge tube. Thermionic emissions from heating up the filament Collisions with gas ions that are drawn to ...
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Different results for energy of photon when using expression for kinetic energy and Planck's relation

Using Planck's relation between frequency and energy of a photon. $E=hf$ $f=(v/\lambda)$, but $v$=c for light, thus $f=c/\lambda$ , substituting this expression for $f$ in Planck's relation: $E=hc/\...
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Photoelectric effect: voltage vs current graphs

I watched this youtube and I was kinda confused in the graphs that they used: *int refers to intensity For this part, the red graph is meant to be the new one, and I'm not sure if the graph is just ...
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In Compton effect, why is there a continuous distribution of wavelengths (including $\lambda$)instead of just $\lambda'$ for every fixed angle?

I was explained Compton effect as a collision between a photon and an electron that can be considered free. The equation is $\lambda' = \lambda + \lambda_c(1-\cos\phi)$ I've been reading more on the ...
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Is the energy of a photon of λ wavelength, the smallest transferable energy in photoelectric effect?

Is the energy of a photon of light of wavelength λ, the smallest transferable energy unit for that same light?And is this the reason there is no partial transfer of energy in photoelectric effect, ...
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In the photoelectric effect, is energy transferred to the electron if $hf < \phi$?

My notes describe the photoelectric effect as an 'all or nothing' interaction, in which a photon either gives up all of its energy to the electron or gives up none of its energy. Does this mean that ...
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What happens when $f = f_0$ or $hf = \phi$ in the photoelectric effect?

In this answer: What happens when work function $\phi = hf$ It says when $hf = \phi$, "The electron will just "go up" to the top of potential barrier and then it will "go down"...
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Why do some electromagnetic waves have more than one photon?

I know that the energy of an EM wave is equal to nhv, where n is the number of photons, but why/how do the number of photons in a wave vary? If a single atom emits an EM wave with an energy of 100 ...
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Photoelectric effect conceptual doubt [duplicate]

My teacher told me that for emission of one electron from metal surface only one photon is responsible and electrons have different kinetic energy after emission as some of the energy is not absorbed ...
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4 answers
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Had scientists ever fired single protons/electrons/particles before Einstein's work on the photoelectric effect?

Had scientists ever managed to fire/detect single, individual particles, photons/electrons/etc., before the photoelectric effect was discovered and Einstein's work on it saying that light also acted ...
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Is the intensity of light dependent on number of photons per unit area?

I was learning about the photoelectric effect of light and there it says more the intensity of light, the more number of electrons will be ejected from the metal surface given that the frequency of ...
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Are photons and electrons "elastic" particles?

My teacher told me that Photons are elastic particles (allegedly it was a postulate of Max Plancks's Quantum theory too) and that during the photoelectric effect due to "elastic collision" ...
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Why is there no time delay in photo electric effect? [closed]

Can someone explain to me (in simple words) why there is no time delay between photon absorption and photoelectric emission?
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Frank Hertz Experiment vs Photoelectric Effect saturation current

I have a doubt. I understand that in the photoelectric effect even a increasing voltage does not imply a increase in current since the rate of emission is determine by the light. However in Frank ...
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5 answers
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Does the quantum nature of light arise from its interaction with matter? [closed]

I have a desire to reconcile the results of the photoelectric effect with the Maxwellian picture of electromagnetic radiation. I wish to explore, the possibility that the quantum nature of the photon ...
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