Stack Exchange Network

Stack Exchange network consists of 175 Q&A communities including Stack Overflow, the largest, most trusted online community for developers to learn, share their knowledge, and build their careers.

Visit Stack Exchange

Questions tagged [photoelectric-effect]

The observed behavior in which light falling on certain metals can eject electrons from the surface.

0
votes
0answers
19 views

KE in photoelectric effect

I photoelectric effect when a single photon's energy is absorbed, why don't all get the same Max $KE$. Because for an electron, there can be no loss in heat or any friction and all. Why do most of the ...
0
votes
1answer
25 views

Photoelectric effect in space floating metal

I have read this question: Electrical neutrality in photoelectric effect Now the answer by HiddenBabel says: Metals are conductors. As electrons escape, new electrons easily flow from ground ...
0
votes
1answer
20 views

Electrical neutrality in photoelectric effect

In photo electric effect ,if electrons escape, shouldn't that leave the metal positively charged ??. How does it maintain its electrical neutrality ? And if it doesn't , shouldn't the work function ...
0
votes
0answers
22 views

Energy in photoelectric effect

When a monochromatic light hits a surface there are two possible scenarios. First energy of the light is greater or equal to work function and second energy of light is smaller than work function. In ...
0
votes
2answers
55 views

Why does decreasing the wavelength of light while maintaining intensity decrease current in photo electric effect

I understand a photon with a smaller wavelength is more energetic so for a given intensity, less photons are incident on the electrons and so less photo electrons reach the detector per second. ...
3
votes
0answers
35 views

Planck's constant calculated by photoelectric effect laboratory is off

I conducted an experiment today where I had to use a photocathode of unknown material (model: Daedalon Corporation Photoelectric Effect EP-05) and study the photoelectric (PE) effect to make a ...
1
vote
1answer
15 views

Does quantum efficiency of solar cells vary with irradiance?

I want to know if a solar cell exposed to high irradiance (perhaps artificial light) of say 1500 w/m2 would suffer reduced QE. For the sake of the question lets assume the solar cell is in an ...
2
votes
1answer
41 views

Free electrons, conduction electrons and the photoelectric effect

I had this statement in my physics textbook Photoelectric effect is seen only when electrons are bound, because free electrons cannot absorb the whole energy of the photon while conserving ...
1
vote
1answer
19 views

Variation Of Saturation Current in Photoelectric Effect [duplicate]

In the textbook I refer to,and various places online, it is given that saturation current is independent of the frequency of light used and only depends on the intensity . But, let intensity= I ,here,...
0
votes
0answers
16 views

Will an electron move in a photoelectric effect apparatus if the electrodes have 0 potential difference?

So I was reviewing for my test but I was struck by this question and it has been bothering me ever since. What if I have 0 potential difference between the electrodes in a photoelectric effect ...
0
votes
1answer
30 views

Questions regarding a demonstration of photoelectric effect

I would like you to refer to this video for the question https://youtu.be/v-1zjdUTu0o I have a few questions regarding the demonstration 1) Can I use a zinc plate extracted from a heavy duty ...
0
votes
2answers
20 views

photoelectric effect and Quantized energy state

I know that the energy state electron is quantized. for example if n1's energy is 1 and n2's energy is 3 electron only absorbs 2 energy. it never absorbs 1 or 2.5 energy. but i learned that if the ...
0
votes
1answer
19 views

What if potential difference is 0 in photoelectric effect. And what would happen as it goes negative

I'm confused as to why potential difference in itself is not sufficient to move electrons and there is a certain kinetic energy required to move the electron
1
vote
0answers
13 views

Geometry of the electrodes in experiments on the photoelectric effect

My school uses a commercial apparatus for freshman student labs on the photoelectric effect, but the documentation, written for students, is at a very basic level and seems to oversimplify or not ...
2
votes
3answers
91 views

Is the absorption of photons instantaneous?

I'd like to know if the excitation of chlorophyll by photons $$Chl+ h\nu \rightarrow Chl^*$$ is instantaneous. I imagine a photon arriving $0.5$ Angstroms away from the molecule, and then disappearing ...
1
vote
1answer
33 views

Condition of Photoelectric effect

To perform photoelectric effect, should the metal piece kept in vacuum or in a tube filled with any specific gas?
1
vote
1answer
23 views

Threshold frequency in photoelectric effect [duplicate]

If I take a metal sample and I throw light on it, and the emitted photons have frequency less than the threshold frequency required to make an electron come out of that particular metal. So the ...
0
votes
0answers
20 views

Photoelectric effect and emission

How would I calculate the number of electrons emitted from say a given intensity of light. For instance number of electrons emitted per unit time interval (second) in a $\text{mm}^2$ metal surface? ...
1
vote
0answers
47 views

Photoelectric effect - the reason for exponential graphs and a misconception about the concept of intensity

We have this basic PASCO Photoelectric Effect equipment in our lab and there are two things I would like to ask about the experiment. We keep either the area apertures or wavelength filters fixed and ...
2
votes
1answer
55 views

Effect of electric field on Photoelectric effect

The effect of electric potential on the threshold frequency in the Lenard's photoelectric experiment I have been taught that electrons can ejected from the atom by applying strong electric field(...
0
votes
2answers
100 views

Why does photocurrent increase with voltage for a while?

Consider a photoelectric setup as below to investigate the maximum kinetic energy electrons. When we graph photocurrent against the voltage applied against the electrons moving, why does the ...
1
vote
1answer
42 views

Does Stopping Voltage actually produce 0 photocurrent?

The stopping voltage is the voltage applied across the photoelectric plates to measure the maximum KE of ejected electrons. This is as the electric field will apply a force against the velocity of the ...
1
vote
1answer
51 views

Why does a single X-ray photon generate 1620 electrons when it hits CCD detector?

Fe55 is one radioactive isotope. It emits X ray photons : mainly k-alpha & k-beta lines. Why does a single X-ray photon generate 1620 electrons when it hits CCD detector ? While, in photo-...
0
votes
0answers
26 views

What happens when a photon hits a particle (radiative heat transfer, photoelectric effect)?

By relating temperature to particle motion, the kinetic theory of gases gives an intuitive explanation of conductive heat transfer; faster particles collide with slower ones to transfer kinetic energy....
2
votes
1answer
41 views

Does work function of a metal plate depend on its net charge? [duplicate]

In photoelectric experiment, we always keep the work function constant. It seems to me that as the metal plate loses its negative charge, it may take more energy to pick up an electron off the surface ...
0
votes
0answers
33 views

Positive and Negative Corona Discharge

I have two plates with high voltage (+30KV) with a distance of 2mm. Inside of the vacuum, I did not see any discharge or arcing. After I insert the Rubidium vapor, I start seeing the corona discharge ...
1
vote
0answers
36 views

Photo-electric effect with light reflected from a blue wall

Suppose we have a metal which has a work function corresponding to yellow. Obviously, if light with frequency greater than yello is made to fall on it, it would show photo-electric effect.Now, ...
2
votes
1answer
73 views

Are there ways to detect/measure photons that don't involve electrons?

As per question, are there ways to detect photons, and/or to measure their energy, that don't involve any interaction with electrons? And if yes, are there detectors which use photon interactions with ...
1
vote
1answer
56 views

Mechanism for a photon to impart momentum to an atom [duplicate]

Picture a simple hydrogen atom with one electron which is bound to a proton (nucleus). When trying to impart momentum to the atom, we may specify the photon wavelength to be $\lambda = 121.57$ nm to ...
0
votes
0answers
37 views

photoelectric emission with multiple photons [duplicate]

Is it possible for two or more photons to collide simultaneously with one electron, resulting in the emission of that electron from the metal surface? I searched for two photon absorption and found ...
0
votes
1answer
49 views

What is the relationship between photocurrent vs frequency?

I'm very confused, as there are conflicting sources: Why doesn't photoelectric current increase with frequency of the incident wave? This states that frequency does not affect current because it ...
1
vote
1answer
86 views

Number of photons in range of frequencies

I was trying to calculate the number of photons emitted by a light of constant power $P$ between frequencies $\nu_1$ and $\nu_2$. I have already checked this question but the reply marked as correct ...
12
votes
4answers
1k views

Is photoelectric effect a surface phenomenon?

I got this question on a test and the answer key states that the answer is 'Yes'. According to what I understand electrons are emmitted with different kinetic energies based upon their depth from the ...
0
votes
1answer
79 views

Number of photons in a range of wavelengths

I need to calculate the number of photons in a beam of light of power $P$. I know that it has constant power $P$ across the range of wavelengths $[\lambda_1,\lambda_2]$. So, for calculating this, I've ...
0
votes
0answers
13 views

Quantisation of radiation energy [duplicate]

I am currently studying about the dual nature of radiation and matter. I have come across how the radiation energy is quantified by saying that it is built up of discrete units. Though I fairly have a ...
0
votes
0answers
11 views

Hallwachs effect with positive plate

If I send light of a bow lamp onto a negativly charged zinc plate it discharges as expected from the hallwachs effect. However the same occurs if I use a positivly charged plate. This shouldn't happen ...
1
vote
0answers
23 views

Extraction energy of an elecrron

Is the extraction energy of an electron out of a metal the same in a neutral metal and the same metal negatively charged ? If not what is the difference between these two energies ? In the ...
0
votes
2answers
64 views

Photoelectric effect: Why do electrons emitted have differing kinetic energy?

I had originally thought that electrons can be moved from a lower energy level to a higher energy level with an applied voltage. Thus, putting an applied voltage on a given material will allow a ...
0
votes
0answers
27 views

I want to know the name of a type of cable

I was doing an experiment on photoelectric effect. The photocell had a cable from which both the anode and cathode wires came out. I was told to find out the name of the cable. here's a skillfully ...
0
votes
3answers
113 views

How is an electron ejected in photoelectric effect?

The ejecetion of an electron from a metal occurs when a photon from a sufficiently high energy light is made to fall on metal. My question is that isn't wave capable of doing the same? Is it so that ...
0
votes
3answers
184 views

What are the factors on which wavelength of X-rays depends upon? [closed]

So the thing is that I was learning about X-rays and I came across this line that minimum wavelength of continuous X-ray spectra depends only upon Anode voltage about which I'm sceptical because $$eV=...
0
votes
2answers
46 views

Photoelectric effect using paper pins

Suppose I have 2 pointed stainless steel paper pins. I also have a convex lens and super strong sunlight. The pointed head is painted black. Sunlight is focussed on pointed head of one pin. The pin ...
1
vote
0answers
42 views

photoelectric effect when the plate is moving

Consider a plate that is moving away from the light source with respect to the ground and the frequency of the light is equal to the threshold frequency. Now if we observe the same experiment from a ...
1
vote
2answers
93 views

How are photons absorbed by electrons?

I study physics in high school and I was told about the Photoelectric Effect and Compton Effect, and there is something that seems strange to me: How does a photon physically absorbed an electron and ...
1
vote
0answers
30 views

Why is the photoionization cross section smaller at higher photon energies?

I read that the photoionization of a ground state hydrogen atom for photon energies $h\nu > I_H$ (where $I_H$ is the ionization energy of $H$ at $13.6 \, \mathrm{eV}$ has a smaller cross section ...
0
votes
2answers
57 views

Does classical physics allow a flow of electrons in vacuum to form a current?

My physics teacher today proposed this question as a homework. My view is that it does allow the current to flow classically.
0
votes
3answers
66 views

energy of a photon for a complex wave

If I use a plane wave of light given by $$E=E_o \sin(\omega t+\phi)$$ for photoelectric effect, then the energy of photon associated is given by $h\nu$ where $\nu=\frac{\omega}{2\pi}$ But suppose ...
-5
votes
1answer
92 views

Is the uncertainty principle a circular argument? [closed]

Uncertainty is due to the measurement techniques humans tend to use requiring photoelectric effect. The Planck constant is due to the photoelectric effect. If the standard deviation of measurement was ...
0
votes
1answer
54 views

Probability of Photoelectric and Campton decrease as photon energy increases, WHY? [closed]

Why Probability of Photoelectric and Campton decrease as photon energy increases??
2
votes
0answers
86 views

Relativistic photoelectric effect

Suppose, one conducted an experiment with a monochromatic light shining on a metal plate with a certain work function. It turns out the electron is ejected. When this experiment is observed by another ...