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Questions tagged [photoelectric-effect]

The observed behavior in which light falling on certain metals can eject electrons from the surface.

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2answers
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Differing stopping voltage formula

$V_0 = hf - \phi_{col}$ In a lecture, I was give the above formula for stopping voltage. It seemed a little simplified and weird to me as the LHS is in volts but the RHS is in electron volts. I did a ...
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Why emission of an electron does not depend on light's intensity?

There's something that confuses me about the photoelectric effect. In an article I read, it's stated that the emission of an electron does not depend on the light's intensity. I'm not sure on which ...
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What happens to photon in photoelectric effect

In photoelectric effect, when the photon gives energy to the electron, then what happens to itself? Where does it go? For me the photon must take the place of electron after the electron escapes the ...
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The polarization filter does not work

I am working in Conduction phenomena Photo-conductivity Experiment. Here the experiment guide . The aim is to measure the photocurrent $I_{Ph}$ as a function of the voltage $U$ at a constant ...
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1answer
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Photoelectric current vs anode potential

Attached is the graph of photoelectric current vs Anode potential as given in my book for same intensity and different frequencies of incident light for the same metal(hence same work function). In ...
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1answer
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Covariant relativistic photoelectric effect

General textbooks introduce the photoelectric effect as the Einstein's formula $$hf=hf_0+E_c(max)$$ and where $E_c=mv^2_e/2$ is the kinetic energy maximum value, the work function is $eV_0=hf_0$, and ...
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What happens to the extra energy when the photon hits an electron? (+ Compton's Effect)

I understand that the electron needs a specific quantized amount of energy in order to be excited to another state. For example, hydrogen requires $10.2\ \mathrm{eV}$ for its electron to jump from $n=...
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Relation between current (not at saturation) and voltage in photoelectric effect

This is the question I got for an assignment. How do I determine stopping potential from this data? I can see that the relation between $V$ and $I$ seems to be linear, so can I just use the equation ...
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1answer
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Is Einstein's Photoelectric effect a reversible phenomenon?

If one emits a light beam in a given frequency (obviously there is a threshold frequency) over a metal plate, even on low energies, some electrons could be ejected and one could been measuring an ...
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is a photon interacting via photons?

Electrically charged particles interact with each other via the exchange of a photon (as it is the exchange particle of the electromagnetic force). When considering, e.g., the Compton-effect, where a ...
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1answer
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Is the direction of momentum important in photoelectric effect?

I was wondering that does the momentum (direction also) of emitted electron depend on absurbed photon or not? I couldn't find much explanation on internet about it. They show like the emission of ...
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1answer
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Photoelectric effect photon attenuation disctontinuities

Can anyone explain why there are the discontinuities in proximity of the electron energies? I was thinking : every time the photon gains enough energy to ionize a new and a more bounded electron there ...
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Classical wave energy vs Photon energy

The classical theory says that the intensity of light is proportional to the square of the amplitude of an oscillating electric field. Quantum theory gives the intensity of light as proportional to ...
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3answers
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Consequences of changes in photoelectric experiment setup on stopping potential

If we increase the distance between the collector plate and the emitter plate in the setup of the photoelectric experiment, then will there be any change in the stopping potential? (this thought comes ...
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1answer
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What kind of interaction phototelectric effect is?

All standard-elementary books which discuss modern physics quote the value of time of interaction for phototelectric effect to be less than $10^{-8}$ seconds. If the phenomenon takes about this time, ...
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Why no photoelectric effect for copper and iron?

The classic demonstration of the photoelectric effect is discharging a negatively charged electroscope by illuminating zinc or aluminium connected to the electroscope with 254 nm light from a mercury ...
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Photoelectric effect confusion

I just have a quick confusion, so photoelectric effect says that light or photon act as particles not waves, however the photon energy is given by $E=hf$, so shouldn't the photon be initially a wave ...
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What importance of battery “ voltage” between cathode and anode in photocell? [duplicate]

In photocell at threshold frequency $f=f_0$ and voltage $>0$ (between cathode - and anode +) Is current $=0$ at $f=f_0$ and $v>0$? When voltage $>0$ and $f=f_0$, Does photoelectron have KE ...
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Is photocell current equal zero at threshold frequency?

In photocell is there currant at threshold frequency $f=f_o$? I mean $I=0$ at $f=f_o$?
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Does photoelectric work function change with voltage?

Consider a typical photoelectric effect investigation setup like: Light of a minimum frequency (threshold frequency) must be shone on the cathode in order to eject electrons. The minimum frequency ...
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1answer
60 views

Direction of emission of Photoelectrons [duplicate]

Where does the information about the direction of the emission of the Photoelectron come from? Does it get it from the incoming Photon? I have seen a picture on wikipedia-page of the photoelectric ...
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1answer
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KE in photoelectric effect

I photoelectric effect when a single photon's energy is absorbed, why don't all get the same Max $KE$. Because for an electron, there can be no loss in heat or any friction and all. Why do most of the ...
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1answer
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Photoelectric effect in space floating metal

I have read this question: Electrical neutrality in photoelectric effect Now the answer by HiddenBabel says: Metals are conductors. As electrons escape, new electrons easily flow from ground ...
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Electrical neutrality in photoelectric effect

In photo electric effect ,if electrons escape, shouldn't that leave the metal positively charged ??. How does it maintain its electrical neutrality ? And if it doesn't , shouldn't the work function ...
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Energy in photoelectric effect

When a monochromatic light hits a surface there are two possible scenarios. First energy of the light is greater or equal to work function and second energy of light is smaller than work function. In ...
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2answers
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Why does decreasing the wavelength of light while maintaining intensity decrease current in photo electric effect [duplicate]

I understand a photon with a smaller wavelength is more energetic so for a given intensity, less photons are incident on the electrons and so less photo electrons reach the detector per second. ...
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Planck's constant calculated by photoelectric effect laboratory is off

I conducted an experiment today where I had to use a photocathode of unknown material (model: Daedalon Corporation Photoelectric Effect EP-05) and study the photoelectric (PE) effect to make a ...
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1answer
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Does quantum efficiency of solar cells vary with irradiance?

I want to know if a solar cell exposed to high irradiance (perhaps artificial light) of say 1500 w/m2 would suffer reduced QE. For the sake of the question lets assume the solar cell is in an ...
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1answer
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Free electrons, conduction electrons and the photoelectric effect

I had this statement in my physics textbook Photoelectric effect is seen only when electrons are bound, because free electrons cannot absorb the whole energy of the photon while conserving ...
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1answer
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Variation Of Saturation Current in Photoelectric Effect [duplicate]

In the textbook I refer to,and various places online, it is given that saturation current is independent of the frequency of light used and only depends on the intensity . But, let intensity= I ,here,...
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Will an electron move in a photoelectric effect apparatus if the electrodes have 0 potential difference?

So I was reviewing for my test but I was struck by this question and it has been bothering me ever since. What if I have 0 potential difference between the electrodes in a photoelectric effect ...
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1answer
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Questions regarding a demonstration of photoelectric effect

I would like you to refer to this video for the question https://youtu.be/v-1zjdUTu0o I have a few questions regarding the demonstration 1) Can I use a zinc plate extracted from a heavy duty ...
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photoelectric effect and Quantized energy state

I know that the energy state electron is quantized. for example if n1's energy is 1 and n2's energy is 3 electron only absorbs 2 energy. it never absorbs 1 or 2.5 energy. but i learned that if the ...
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1answer
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What if potential difference is 0 in photoelectric effect. And what would happen as it goes negative

I'm confused as to why potential difference in itself is not sufficient to move electrons and there is a certain kinetic energy required to move the electron
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Geometry of the electrodes in experiments on the photoelectric effect

My school uses a commercial apparatus for freshman student labs on the photoelectric effect, but the documentation, written for students, is at a very basic level and seems to oversimplify or not ...
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3answers
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Is the absorption of photons instantaneous?

I'd like to know if the excitation of chlorophyll by photons $$Chl+ h\nu \rightarrow Chl^*$$ is instantaneous. I imagine a photon arriving $0.5$ Angstroms away from the molecule, and then disappearing ...
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1answer
38 views

Condition of Photoelectric effect

To perform photoelectric effect, should the metal piece kept in vacuum or in a tube filled with any specific gas?
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1answer
63 views

Threshold frequency in photoelectric effect [duplicate]

If I take a metal sample and I throw light on it, and the emitted photons have frequency less than the threshold frequency required to make an electron come out of that particular metal. So the ...
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Photoelectric effect and emission

How would I calculate the number of electrons emitted from say a given intensity of light. For instance number of electrons emitted per unit time interval (second) in a $\text{mm}^2$ metal surface? ...
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Photoelectric effect - the reason for exponential graphs and a misconception about the concept of intensity

We have this basic PASCO Photoelectric Effect equipment in our lab and there are two things I would like to ask about the experiment. We keep either the area apertures or wavelength filters fixed and ...
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1answer
76 views

Effect of electric field on Photoelectric effect

The effect of electric potential on the threshold frequency in the Lenard's photoelectric experiment I have been taught that electrons can ejected from the atom by applying strong electric field(...
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2answers
281 views

Why does photocurrent increase with voltage for a while?

Consider a photoelectric setup as below to investigate the maximum kinetic energy electrons. When we graph photocurrent against the voltage applied against the electrons moving, why does the ...
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1answer
55 views

Does Stopping Voltage actually produce 0 photocurrent?

The stopping voltage is the voltage applied across the photoelectric plates to measure the maximum KE of ejected electrons. This is as the electric field will apply a force against the velocity of the ...
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1answer
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Why does a single X-ray photon generate 1620 electrons when it hits CCD detector?

Fe55 is one radioactive isotope. It emits X ray photons : mainly k-alpha & k-beta lines. Why does a single X-ray photon generate 1620 electrons when it hits CCD detector ? While, in photo-...
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What happens when a photon hits a particle (radiative heat transfer, photoelectric effect)?

By relating temperature to particle motion, the kinetic theory of gases gives an intuitive explanation of conductive heat transfer; faster particles collide with slower ones to transfer kinetic energy....
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1answer
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Does work function of a metal plate depend on its net charge? [duplicate]

In photoelectric experiment, we always keep the work function constant. It seems to me that as the metal plate loses its negative charge, it may take more energy to pick up an electron off the surface ...
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Positive and Negative Corona Discharge

I have two plates with high voltage (+30KV) with a distance of 2mm. Inside of the vacuum, I did not see any discharge or arcing. After I insert the Rubidium vapor, I start seeing the corona discharge ...
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Photo-electric effect with light reflected from a blue wall

Suppose we have a metal which has a work function corresponding to yellow. Obviously, if light with frequency greater than yello is made to fall on it, it would show photo-electric effect.Now, ...
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1answer
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Are there ways to detect/measure photons that don't involve electrons?

As per question, are there ways to detect photons, and/or to measure their energy, that don't involve any interaction with electrons? And if yes, are there detectors which use photon interactions with ...
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1answer
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Mechanism for a photon to impart momentum to an atom [duplicate]

Picture a simple hydrogen atom with one electron which is bound to a proton (nucleus). When trying to impart momentum to the atom, we may specify the photon wavelength to be $\lambda = 121.57$ nm to ...