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Questions tagged [photoelectric-effect]

The observed behavior in which light falling on certain metals can eject electrons from the surface.

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Photoelectric effect wow

The effect of electric potential on the threshold frequency in the Lenard's photoelectric experiment I have been taught that electrons can ejected from the atom by applying strong electric field(...
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Photoelectric effect possible application [on hold]

I just had a lesson on the photoelectric effect and I was wondering wether you could use very low KE photoelectrons to cool another material down.
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What happens when a photon hits a particle (radiative heat transfer, photoelectric effect)?

By relating temperature to particle motion, the kinetic theory of gases gives an intuitive explanation of conductive heat transfer; faster particles collide with slower ones to transfer kinetic energy....
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Does work function of a metal plate depend on its net charge? [duplicate]

In photoelectric experiment, we always keep the work function constant. It seems to me that as the metal plate loses its negative charge, it may take more energy to pick up an electron off the surface ...
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Positive and Negative Corona Discharge

I have two plates with high voltage (+30KV) with a distance of 2mm. Inside of the vacuum, I did not see any discharge or arcing. After I insert the Rubidium vapor, I start seeing the corona discharge ...
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Photo-electric effect with light reflected from a blue wall

Suppose we have a metal which has a work function corresponding to yellow. Obviously, if light with frequency greater than yello is made to fall on it, it would show photo-electric effect.Now, ...
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Are there ways to detect/measure photons that don't involve electrons?

As per question, are there ways to detect photons, and/or to measure their energy, that don't involve any interaction with electrons? And if yes, are there detectors which use photon interactions with ...
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Mechanism for a photon to impart momentum to an atom [duplicate]

Picture a simple hydrogen atom with one electron which is bound to a proton (nucleus). When trying to impart momentum to the atom, we may specify the photon wavelength to be $\lambda = 121.57$ nm to ...
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photoelectric emission with multiple photons [duplicate]

Is it possible for two or more photons to collide simultaneously with one electron, resulting in the emission of that electron from the metal surface? I searched for two photon absorption and found ...
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What is the relationship between photocurrent vs frequency?

I'm very confused, as there are conflicting sources: Why doesn't photoelectric current increase with frequency of the incident wave? This states that frequency does not affect current because it ...
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85 views

Number of photons in range of frequencies

I was trying to calculate the number of photons emitted by a light of constant power $P$ between frequencies $\nu_1$ and $\nu_2$. I have already checked this question but the reply marked as correct ...
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Is photoelectric effect a surface phenomenon?

I got this question on a test and the answer key states that the answer is 'Yes'. According to what I understand electrons are emmitted with different kinetic energies based upon their depth from the ...
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Number of photons in a range of wavelengths

I need to calculate the number of photons in a beam of light of power $P$. I know that it has constant power $P$ across the range of wavelengths $[\lambda_1,\lambda_2]$. So, for calculating this, I've ...
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Quantisation of radiation energy [duplicate]

I am currently studying about the dual nature of radiation and matter. I have come across how the radiation energy is quantified by saying that it is built up of discrete units. Though I fairly have a ...
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Hallwachs effect with positive plate

If I send light of a bow lamp onto a negativly charged zinc plate it discharges as expected from the hallwachs effect. However the same occurs if I use a positivly charged plate. This shouldn't happen ...
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Extraction energy of an elecrron

Is the extraction energy of an electron out of a metal the same in a neutral metal and the same metal negatively charged ? If not what is the difference between these two energies ? In the ...
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Photoelectric effect: Why do electrons emitted have differing kinetic energy?

I had originally thought that electrons can be moved from a lower energy level to a higher energy level with an applied voltage. Thus, putting an applied voltage on a given material will allow a ...
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I want to know the name of a type of cable

I was doing an experiment on photoelectric effect. The photocell had a cable from which both the anode and cathode wires came out. I was told to find out the name of the cable. here's a skillfully ...
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How is an electron ejected in photoelectric effect?

The ejecetion of an electron from a metal occurs when a photon from a sufficiently high energy light is made to fall on metal. My question is that isn't wave capable of doing the same? Is it so that ...
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What are the factors on which wavelength of X-rays depends upon? [closed]

So the thing is that I was learning about X-rays and I came across this line that minimum wavelength of continuous X-ray spectra depends only upon Anode voltage about which I'm sceptical because $$eV=...
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Photoelectric effect using paper pins

Suppose I have 2 pointed stainless steel paper pins. I also have a convex lens and super strong sunlight. The pointed head is painted black. Sunlight is focussed on pointed head of one pin. The pin ...
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photoelectric effect when the plate is moving

Consider a plate that is moving away from the light source with respect to the ground and the frequency of the light is equal to the threshold frequency. Now if we observe the same experiment from a ...
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How are photons absorbed by electrons?

I study physics in high school and I was told about the Photoelectric Effect and Compton Effect, and there is something that seems strange to me: How does a photon physically absorbed an electron and ...
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Why is the photoionization cross section smaller at higher photon energies?

I read that the photoionization of a ground state hydrogen atom for photon energies $h\nu > I_H$ (where $I_H$ is the ionization energy of $H$ at $13.6 \, \mathrm{eV}$ has a smaller cross section ...
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Does classical physics allow a flow of electrons in vacuum to form a current?

My physics teacher today proposed this question as a homework. My view is that it does allow the current to flow classically.
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energy of a photon for a complex wave

If I use a plane wave of light given by $$E=E_o \sin(\omega t+\phi)$$ for photoelectric effect, then the energy of photon associated is given by $h\nu$ where $\nu=\frac{\omega}{2\pi}$ But suppose ...
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Is the uncertainty principle a circular argument? [closed]

Uncertainty is due to the measurement techniques humans tend to use requiring photoelectric effect. The Planck constant is due to the photoelectric effect. If the standard deviation of measurement was ...
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Probability of Photoelectric and Campton decrease as photon energy increases, WHY? [closed]

Why Probability of Photoelectric and Campton decrease as photon energy increases??
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Relativistic photoelectric effect

Suppose, one conducted an experiment with a monochromatic light shining on a metal plate with a certain work function. It turns out the electron is ejected. When this experiment is observed by another ...
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Why are solar cells affected by temperature?

I know that solar cells efficiency increase with lower temperatures, but why? I found only equations on efficiency using temperature coefficient, but I want to know the physics behind it. Thank for ...
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photoelectric equation explanation [closed]

how to determine whether or not relativistic mechanics is needed to verify the photoelectric equation with a 1% uncertainty. While the stopping potentials are few volts.
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Hallwachs' Experiment: why zinc?

The famous experiment by Hallwachs that eventually lead to Einstein's photon hypothesis was conducted using a negatively charged zinc plate. I always thought that the effect was initially observed ...
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Photoelectric effect and the type of the incident light

Given the relation between the voltage V and the photocurrent I . Does this graph hold for both monochromatic light and white light? And why there is a value for the photocurrent I at V=0 ?
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Threshold energy for photoelectric effect

I'm trying to derive the threshold energy for the photon in photoelectric effect, but I'm not sure how to treat the electron. What can I assume about the final kinetic energy of the electron? I want ...
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Does the work function of a metal change with respect to the wavelength of emitted photoelectrons?

I am taking an introduction course to quantum mechanics, in a homework question we are asked to calculate Planck's constant given the maximum energy and wavelengths of two types of photoelectron ...
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What does it mean if the resistance of a semiconductor increases due to light?

I have synthesized an $n$-type semiconductor material $\text{ZnO}$. Under light illumination, its resistance keeps increasing. What are the reasons for this?
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Probability of Photoelectric Interactions

I have am currently reading Radiation Detection and Measurement, by Gleen F.Knoll, and in chapter 2 page 49, he talks about the probability of the photoelectric interaction as: $$\tau \approx C \frac{...
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38 views

What is the term for the light-sensitive metals in the photoelectric effect?

Can anyone please tell me the term used to refer to metals such as those used in photoelectric effect which can generate a current from light?
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Drift velocity and current at different cross sections in the tube during photoelectric effect

In photoelectric effect if we look at two different cross sections inside the tube at saturation current. Then the average drift velocity will be different as the electrons are accelerated by external ...
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Can electron leave an atom due to electric field?

I know about photoelectric field, but it's about an E&M waves (photons). How about external electric\Coulombic\static field (virtual photons)? Can it turn the electron away from atom? I wonder, ...
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Why the free electrons in space can not be excited by photons? [duplicate]

Any electron (in the shell) at any orbit of around of an atom can be stimulated by photon (of course as depending on the energy level of photon). So that, it can change its orbit and come back ...
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In photoelectric effect, what is effect of frequency? [closed]

So what does the frequency of the light in photoelectric effect does ? Does it increases number of electrons?
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Under ideal circumstances, is it possible to construct a 100% efficient photoelectric circuit?

Lets assume some ideal circumstances: 1) The incident light has same frequency, greater than the threshold frequency (sufficient to eject inner electrons too), throughout. 2) The work function ...
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Photoelectric effect with electrons

Consider a beam of electrons (each electron with energy E0) incident on a metal surface kept in an evacuated chamber. Then,. (a) no electrons will be emitted as only photons can emit electrons. (b) ...
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Energy quantization at differenet frequencies

An electron emits light of v1 frequency. When we say energy is quantized in this case, the minimum packet of energy would be hv1 but electron can emit 2hv1, 3hv1 and so on energy. is that correct.? ...
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Why does classical physics imply every mode of vibration should have the same thermal energy?

I've just started reading about photo electric effect here, and my high school level understanding goes something like this : 1) By 1900 we had Maxwell equations and treated light as a wave. 2) But ...
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Is the phase of the photon which photoemits the electron anyhow reflected in the photoelectron wafeunction?

Imagine you have a carrier-envelope stable optical pulse. You use it for photoemission of an electron wave-packet. This electron wave-packet can be considered as a superposition of plane waves, with ...
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In the photoelectric effect experiment of stopping voltage, why isn't there a buildup of negative and positive charge on each side of the circuit?

Given this schematic, and that there is an electric field in the downwards direction due to the power supply, when the photon hits the emitter plate, the electrons leave the upper plate and hit the ...
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81 views

What produces higher frequency light?

I don't know much more than the basics of the theory, so if my question stops making sense at some point, an answer addressing that would be awesome. From what I understand so far, photon creation ...
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Shouldn't the frequency increase the current in the photoelectric effect [duplicate]

I know that intensity determines the no. of electrons and the current produced. But if the intensity is constant and the frequency changes, the kinetic energy of the photoelectrons changes, so their ...