Questions tagged [observables]

A quantum observable is a measurable operator whose corresponding property of the state can be determined by some sequence of physical operations ("observation"), such as submitting the system to various electromagnetic fields and eventually reading a value. In systems governed by classical mechanics, any experimentally observable value can be shown to be given by a real-valued function on the set of all possible system states.

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Trying to understand spin in quantum mechanics

I'm trying to understand the concept of spin in Quantum Mechanics. I'm reading "Road to Reality" by Penrose, which despite not being a textbook, is reputed to give one a deep insight into physical ...
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What methods do we use to measure position/momentum of quantum systems in the lab?

I've seen this question asked before but couldn't find a satisfactory answer. What is the difference between measuring position vs. momentum in the lab? Is it just something to do with the energy of ...
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Physical significance of the canonical energy-momentum tensor

I have a question regarding the physical significance of the canonical energy momentum tensor $T_\nu ^\mu$ in the context of classical field theory. It is defined as $T_\nu ^\mu = \frac{\partial \...
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What is the magnitude of a tensor property in a fixed direction?

If I have a physical property represented by a $3 \times 3$ tensor, how can I find its magnitude in a particular direction, say $(\phi, \theta)$ in spherical coordinate system?
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Why don't expectation values for a stationary state evolve over time?

I have an observable $O$ with operator $\hat{O}$. $\Psi_1$ is a wave function in an energy eigenstate, and $\psi_1$ is the corresponding spatial wave function. $E$ is the corresponding energy. It is ...
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How to understand observables in quantum field theory

I am reading a paper about quantum field theory, something that I am new to. I have some experience with quantum mechanics. In the paper, it explains how a field is a function from a spacetime ...
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Determining the state of a system

My textbook says: "To determine the state of a system at a given instant, it suffices to perform on the system a set of measurements corresponding to a complete set of commuting observables (CSCO)" ...
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Heisenberg uncertainty principle in daily life

I need some examples of the Heisenberg uncertainty principle on a basic level, or if possible in daily life. Or maybe a simple explanation for validity of the principle in easier words. I cannot get ...
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Good quantum numbers from a given hamiltonian

The primary reason asking this question to understand good quantum number from a giver Hamiltonian. Is there any good approach that we can identify them? For example: We have a square and in that ...
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What is the implication of overlap between eigenstates of two operators in Quantum Mechanics?

For instance, what does it mean that a certain position eigenstate is also an energy eigenstate? I understand that measurable (Observables) in Quantum mechanics are the operators. Their eigenvalues ...
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Conservation laws and Gauge transformations

I am studying gauge transformations, and my professor asked me: "Can the potentials obtained by the Lorenz gauge be considered physical quantities?" I assumed that "physical quantity" is ...
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Why are entanglement and purity non-linear functions of $\rho$?

Any linear function of the density matrix can be related to a proper observable, but is it not the case of entanglement and purity?
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Observables labelling one-particle states in Quantum Field Theory

I'm studying introductory QFT using the first volume of Weinberg's series, and i'm having problems in understanding how single particle states of the free theory are labelled, i.e. what observables ...
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Do we or do we not observe (measure) superpositions all the time?

This is not a duplicate, the other answers do not specifically solve the contradiction, nor do they give an exact answer. I have read this question: Are we so sure about superposition? How do we ...
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Why must momentum operator in infinite well be self adjoint?

First, let me preface this statement by saying I know that there exists no (unique) self adjoint extension of the standard differential operator for the space $L_2([0,1])$. However, when one attempts ...
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45 views

Eigenvalues of Unitary Matrices

I am considering the standard equation for a unitary transformation $\alpha^* = U \alpha U^{-1}$, where $\alpha$ is an arbitrary linear operator and $U$ is a unitary matrix. Since in quantum ...
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What precisely must you provide to specify the Hilbert space for a particular system in quantum mechanics?

We have: $$i\hbar\frac{d |\Psi(t)\rangle}{d t} = H|\Psi(t)\rangle$$ $|\Psi\rangle$ is an element of the Hilbert space. However, the Hilbert space is unspecified. As an analogy, in classical ...
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How are local observables encoded in this formulation of quantum field theory as a functor?

I've recently begun trying to understand a formulation of quantum field theory as a functor from a category of spacetimes-with-boundaries (bordisms) to a category of Hilbert spaces, as reviewed in [1]....
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Do observables only amount to computing functions of outcome probabilities?

It is well known that in quantum mechanics any Hermitian operator $A$ can be thought of as an observable. Given any (pure) state $\lvert\psi\rangle$, measuring such observable gives an average ...
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Is there a physical observable with the same units as $c/G$?

Dividing the speed of light $c$ by the gravitational constant $G$ yields the dimension mass*time/area or mass/(length * speed) Is there a physical quantity used in textbooks with this dimension? I ...
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Is there a difference between a Hermitian operator and an observable?

My poorly written lecture notes say that any Hermitian operator does have a complete set of orthogonal eigenstates with real corresponding eigenvalues and is therefore an observable. In the article ...
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Why is an operator the quantum mechanical analogue of an observable?

I used to think because that, if objects are treated as waves, then using operators is the necessary thing to do in order to "retrieve" the observable from a given wavefunction. For example, in ...
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Observing the conserved canonical momenta

Suppose I have a Lagrangian $\mathcal{L}[\phi]$ with $\phi$ a cyclic variable, which means that the Lagrangian is symmetric under shift of $\phi\rightarrow\phi+c\quad$. The equation of motion will be ...
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Quantum mechanics on operator [closed]

If any operator is commute with Hamilton then they are labelled such a way that the energy eigenstate are equal and we also know it is a constant of motion. I don't related constant of motion with ...
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Measurement formalisms - POVM formalism vs Hermitian observables

I am thinking in following way of thinking about measurements in quantum mechanics. Please correct any false statements I may be making below. We start with POVMs. Let our POVM be a set of positive ...
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Meaning of time derivative of an operator

Today when my professor was deriving this equation: $$\frac{\mathrm d\langle A\rangle}{\mathrm dt}=\frac{i}{\hbar}\langle\left[H,\,A\right]\rangle+\left\langle\frac{\partial A}{\partial t}\right\...
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“Commuting observables share common eigenstates”

I am struggling to find a precise definition of this line from my quantum mechanics textbook: If $[A,B] = 0$, then the operators commute, and "commuting operators share common eigenstates". This ...
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What are the orthogonal eigenstates of the field operator?

In Peskin & Schroeder section 9.2, they derive the two-point function in the path integral formalism: $$\langle \Omega | \mathcal{T} \left\{ \hat{\phi}(x_1)\hat{\phi}(x_2)\right\} | \Omega \...
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Are $\hat x$ and $\hat p$ assumed to be time-independent operators?

In the book Quantum Mechanics by Cohen-Tannoudji, at $G_{III}$, it is given that and then in the comment section, it is also given that so I'm pretty confused in here, because in one side, they say ...
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For any two unitarily equivalent observables, can both be measured by the same experimental apparatus?

If we have an observable $A$, and a unitary operator $\hat U$, one can easily show that both $\hat A$ and $\hat U \hat A \hat U^{\dagger}$ have the same spectrum - in fact, they are called unitarily ...
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is there a way to experimentally determine the mean of $\hat A$, namely $\langle \hat A \rangle $?

Let $A$ be an observable, then, is there a way to experimentally determine the mean of $\hat A$, namely $\langle \hat A \rangle $? I mean, for example, consider the position operator; it is ...
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120 views

Is the identity operator correspond to the observable which states the existence of system?

As it is claimed in this question, the identity operator is an hermitian operator, but not an observable. However, if I were to build a device, which only measures the existence of an electron in a ...
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Is there any intuitive reason behind why should the eigenfunctions of observables form a basis for our Hilbert space?

Is there any intuitive reason behind why should the eigenfunctions of observables form a basis for our Hilbert space ? For example, in the case of Stern-Gerlach experiment, sending the beam that has ...
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Is is possible to have a pair commuting observables only in a single direction?

In quantum mechanics, for two observables to be compatible, successive measurements of the observables, say $A$ and $B$, should yield the same result as earlier, i.e if we do the measurements with the ...
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What is the variance of |S| in Bell's inequality (CHSH inequality)

Sorry that this isn't a quick question but I didn't know how to make it shorter. I am struggling with this for quite a long time and I would appreciate every help that I can get. I could not find a ...
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How to write an operator in matrix form?

Say I have the following operator: $$\hat { L } =\hbar { \sum_{ \sigma ,l,p } { l } \int_{ 0 }^{ \infty }\!{ \mathrm{d}{ k }_{ 0 }\,\hat { { { a }}}_{ \sigma ,l,p }^{ \dagger } } } \left({ k }_{...
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What if Schrödinger's cat's meowed?

Sorry if this has been asked (every similar question has a title that basically tags Schrödinger's cat) If after the superposition of the cat being dead and alive at one time was created, and the ...
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188 views

Expansion of the infinite square well [closed]

I was studying the expectation value of the energy of a particle in the groud state of the infinite square well after its expansion in terms of width (from $a$ to $2a$), which is: $$\langle H\rangle= ...
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Significance when expectation of a commutator is zero

It is clear to me what it means when the commutator of two operator $[A, B]$ is zero and what it implies. However, is there any significance when the expectation of the commutator $\langle[A, B]\...
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1answer
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What is 'definite' variable in QM?

I have gone through a few of the questions on the website regarding this particular query, but I have not understood what they meant. When a question says that a particle has definite momentum, are ...
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Gaussian State Spread [closed]

A measurement device which can be represented by a 1D quantum system (with canonical observables $X$ and $P$) 'is prepared in a Gaussian state with spread $s$' $$\vert \psi \rangle = \frac{1}{(\pi^2s^...
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Is the period a physical observable in General Relativity?

I am currently seeing the classical tests of GR. To justify the introduction of a test based on the Doppler effect, the professor says that the previous test ( Shapiro and echo-radar test ) is based ...
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Is there any ambiguity when forming operators for classical observables from other operators? [duplicate]

There are some classical quantities, for which we know corresponding operators: e.g. position, momentum. For some others it's straightforward to compose these operators using expressions similar to ...
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What does vector operator for angular momentum measure?

Consider the vector operator for angular momentum $\hat L=\hat L_x \vec i +\hat L_y \vec j + \hat L_z \vec k$. Does this mean that if we want to measure the angular momentum of a particle in state $\...
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How to define an Operator Product Expansion (OPE) on arbitrary Riemann surface for a CFT?

Whenever we define the OPE of a 2D CFT, we do so (at least in the literature that I have come across) on the complex plane. Similarly, the commutation relations between conformal generators $L_n$ and ...
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1answer
132 views

Simultaneous measurements in Quantum Mechanics

In the notes I am using, it states that if two observables A and B are measured simultaneously, then the measurement of A does not affect the measurement of B, and vice versa. However, why does the ...
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286 views

What does Ehrenfest's theorem actually mean?

I am told that Ehrenfest's theorem, applied to a physical observable $\hat A$, is: $$\frac{d\langle\hat A\rangle}{dt}= \frac{i}{\bar h}\langle[\hat H,\hat A]\rangle$$ I don't understand how to use ...
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143 views

Why does gauge invariance HAVE to correspond to an observable?(Or is it the other way round)

Under the line integral of the geometrical Berry phase, a close-loop integral is gauge invariant as if we were to perform a gauge transformation of the initial state, with the end point of the path in ...
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Why are we only interested in unitary/anti-unitary transformations of the underlying Hilbert space when considering symmetries in quantum mechanics?

Background to question: We briefly looked at 'symmetries' in my quantum mechanics course. I was dissatisfied with the fact that we only considered unitary (touched on antiunitary) operators when ...
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Does any basis belong to a set of eigenfunctions of some observable?

In the Quantum Mechanics courses in ocw.mit.edu it is said that any wave function can be expanded as a superposition of the eigenfunctions of any observable, i.e the eigenfunctions form a eigenbasis ...