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Questions tagged [nuclear-physics]

Nuclear physics is the study of the composition, behavior and interaction of atomic nuclei and their constituent parts.

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Calculating Binding Energy of Th 230 nucleus [duplicate]

Ok this is NOT a homework question. But it’s somewhat related. Please bear with me. In calculating BE of Th 230, I used the rest mass of proton as 1.007276u and rest mass of neutron as 1.008665u (as ...
esdoublelef's user avatar
-1 votes
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What kind of law can accurately describe atomic nuclei? [closed]

I understand that atomic nuclei are much too dense to behave as an ideal gas. Are they degenerate? I would assume so (similar to neutron stars), but couldn't find any laws that would accurately ...
Joe Peters's user avatar
6 votes
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80 views

Why is the neutron cross section of hydrogen larger than that of deuterium?

The scattering neutron cross section of hydrogen is about $20$ b, five times larger than that of deuterium. The capture cross section of hydrogen is around 3 orders of magnitude higher than that of ...
agaminon's user avatar
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What if proton is heavier than neutron? [closed]

What really happens to the atom if proton gets heavier than a neutron. I've heard that proton emits radiation. Plz explain
Poorna Chandra's user avatar
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Why are Fermi transitions only significant for beta plus decay with Z>N? [closed]

Why are Fermi transitions only significant in beta plus decay ?
Liam Schmidt's user avatar
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What is binding energy? [closed]

When nucleons are apart from each other there is no force on them but when they are assembled and brought to such distance that nuclear forces start to attract, so kinetic energy of nucleons ...
Tanay Sehgal's user avatar
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1 answer
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I don't understand how energy is conserved when an electron-positron pair decay into a muon-antimuon pair [closed]

I'm trying to self-study particle physics using Griffiths Introduction to Elementary Particles, and when doing exercise 2.7 I'm getting this portion of the question wrong. Given that the problem doesn'...
user412811's user avatar
1 vote
2 answers
131 views

Extracting electron wave functions from experiments

In nuclear and nucleon physics it’s quite standard to extract electromagnetic form factors – which are the Fourier transforms of charge and current distributions – from elastic electron-nucleon or ...
TomS's user avatar
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Calculating asteroid impact blast wave properties

One of the biggest arguments against large nuclear devices is that most of the energy escapes into space. My limited understanding is that this happens because when the shockwave is still in the ...
Abdullah is not an Amalekite's user avatar
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If a proton transforms into a neutron by releasing a positron why should this process create more mass? [duplicate]

If waves can interfere and thats why cancel out or add up why we cannot think the same about the natterial feature called mass as in this explained example in the title of this posted question??Thanks ...
Emilija Bradvica's user avatar
2 votes
1 answer
95 views

Why is the mass-energy graph for atomic mass $A=98$ not quadratic?

For fixed atomic mass $A$ and varying atomic number $Z,$ the mass of the nucleus is quadratic in $Z$. Were it possible for $Z$ to vary continuously, we'd have at most one local minimum. Since we are ...
Display name's user avatar
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A question on perturbed flux function

Given a magnetic field $\mathbf{B}=B_{0}\left(\dfrac{xz}{z_{s}^{2}},\dfrac{yz}{z_{s}^{2}}, 1-2\left( \dfrac{x^{2}}{r_{s}^{2}}+\dfrac{y^{2}}{r_{s}^{2}}\right) -\dfrac{z^{2}}{z_{s}^{2}}\right)$ with the ...
gambling addict's user avatar
1 vote
2 answers
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Is there any formula for calculating the temperature required for nuclear fusion for a specific pressure?

From what I have gathered through my research I've come to the conclusion that the temperature required for nuclear fusion decreases with increasing pressure; this seems intuitive enough. However, I ...
2 ADITYA KRISH DEB XII SCIENCE's user avatar
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Can you create fusion through scattering?

Could you scatter deuteron molecules (D-D) at high energies into some heavy metal target such that at the time of impact the bond in the deuteron molecule is compressed to such a degree that fusion is ...
EigenDragon16's user avatar
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1 answer
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What would happen if the sun became the size of the earth? [closed]

Imagine that a sudden force crushed the Sun from its current size down to the size of the earth,held it at that size for a few moments and then disappeared. What'd happen? I haven't done any of the ...
2 ADITYA KRISH DEB XII SCIENCE's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
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Why does the mass-energy equivalence apply to binding energy when it is derived purely through kinematic means?

I understand that by defining the four velocity, multiplying it by the rest mass and taking the entire thing's norm we get $E^2=m^2+p^2$, but how does this apply to binding energy, or in general ...
Y G's user avatar
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What will happen if we keep bringing two protons closer and closer to each other, starting from a large distance?

I am asking this question for theoretical understanding of the topic: What will happen if we keep bringing two protons closer and closer to each other, starting from a large distance? I understand ...
Devansh Mittal's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
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Why does fission of large nuclei always result in energy released?

When large nuclei undergo fission, the binding energy per nucleon of products is greater than the binding energy of the original nuclei. This only happens (with certainty) when the products are Iron-...
Caleb Seow's user avatar
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1 answer
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Y90 and Sr90 beta emissions have the same ranges but different average energies?

Why does Y90 and Sr90 beta emissions have the same range in air if they have different energy averages (0.935 MeV, 0.196 MeV, espectively)? I would assume that their average energy would indicate ...
ludicrous's user avatar
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3 votes
2 answers
142 views

How can we model the primordial Universe while the interior of a neutron star and comparable states of matter are still mostly unknown?

There is something I never quite understood about the physics of the primordial Universe. There are states of matter at high temperature/high pressure that are still, today, poorly understood. The ...
Vincent's user avatar
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Neutron Dose Rate to Activity Calculation

This is a completely hypothetical question but say I have an unknown radioactive source inside a steel box, given the dimensions of the volumetric source and the container, the neutron dose rate 1m ...
sp444cegirl's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
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What is the standard reference medium in which positron ranges data are obtained in property tables, specifically for isotopes used in PET?

What is the standard reference medium in which positron ranges data are obtained in property tables, specifically for isotopes used in (Positron Emission Tomography (PET)? I can't find any valuable ...
8 votes
5 answers
2k views

How can photons interact with nuclei?

How can photons such as X-rays or gamma rays interact with the nuclei of atoms given that, as I understand it, the length scale of a nucleus is around a couple of femtometers? So, shouldn’t the size ...
EigenDragon16's user avatar
1 vote
2 answers
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Why are zirconium pressure tubes stored in waste containers when removed from nuclear plants?

Hi this is probably a bit of a silly question but I've been thinking a lot about the use of zirconium in nuclear plants. I know that zirconium has a very low neutron absorption cross section and that'...
sp444cegirl's user avatar
3 votes
1 answer
106 views

Which exact element makes Spent Nuclear Fuel dangerous?

I understand that beta and gamma emissions are what makes the decay of a radioisotope dangerous. However, U-238, which is what SNF is mostly made of, doesn't emit gamma or beta particles frequently ...
BigBox989's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
38 views

We know that the mass of nucleus is lesser than calculated value and it converts into binding energy, from where does the mass goes and converts? [closed]

The mass which is lost is very small and we know we can't divide protons or Neutrons. Then how come mass change is very less. Is proton disintegrated? I'm really confused as a high school student. ...
Aditya Mishra's user avatar
3 votes
2 answers
83 views

How is an $\alpha$-particle formed inside a nucleus and with what probability?

While Gamow's theory successfully describes the radioactive $\alpha$-decay by quantum tunnelling, it leaves a key question unanswered. The theory assumes that the $\alpha$ particles pre-exist inside ...
Solidification's user avatar
2 votes
0 answers
62 views

The $\alpha$ particle's energy inside a nucleus is lesser than the Coulomb barrier height. Justify

The $\alpha$-decay is usually explained via quantum tunnelling. This is because the $\alpha$ particles do not have sufficient energy to climb over the Coulomb barrier. But how do we know this? We can ...
Solidification's user avatar
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0 answers
24 views

How to find nuclear color transparency in following reaction?

I am doing my project on Nuclear Color transparency which involves calculating color transparency for nuclear reaction $h+A\rightarrow h+N+(A-1)$. In a nuclear reaction, the nuclear Color transparency ...
isnet's user avatar
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2 votes
1 answer
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Momentum distribution of nucleons inside the deuteron (Paris potential)

I am looking for a graph that shows the momentum distribution of nucleons inside the deuteron. Side note: I know that several models for nucleon-nucleon potentials exist, such as the Paris, Bonn or ...
MCSquared's user avatar
2 votes
2 answers
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Beta decay and maximum beta energy in https://atom.kaeri.re.kr

According to: https://atom.kaeri.re.kr/cgi-bin/decay?Cs-137%20B-, in the beta- decay of Cs-137 to Ba-137, there are 2 likely scenarios: only one electron is emitted. an electron is emitted and the ...
Juan's user avatar
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11 votes
2 answers
2k views

Was the "demon core" hot?

The demon core was a sphere of plutonium (Pu-239, not Pu-238 that is known to get hot and is used in RTG) that weighed 6.2 kilograms (14 lb) and was 8.9 centimeters (3.5 in) in diameter. It was made ...
Nightrider's user avatar
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0 answers
26 views

Explain what happens in the alpha rich freeze out phase of a core collapse supernova(ccSNe) and which reactions takes place

In a core collapse supernova many nuclear reactions takes place and one of them is phase known as alpha rich freeze out phase, it is said to be very important in the production of alpha rich heavy ...
Prince Bordia's user avatar
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1 answer
41 views

Fission reactions with small nuclei

Why are there no fission reactions which produce small nuclei as a result such as a deuteron or tritium?
EigenDragon16's user avatar
1 vote
0 answers
78 views

Do neutrons have a higher entropy than protons?

Since free neutrons want to undergo beta decay into a proton while protons are relatively stable does that mean that neutrons have higher entropy than protons?
Oreoluwa Matilukuro's user avatar
2 votes
1 answer
61 views

Why is the compton continuum so uniform?

According to the Klein-Nishina model, a photon that undergoes compton scattering will scatter at different angles preferentially according to its energy, shown in the image below. Then, looking at ...
ijmert Ulens's user avatar
2 votes
2 answers
158 views

Relation between parity and symmetry for deuteron

I am currently reading the book Física Nuclear y de Partículas by Antonio Ferrer Soria. In this book the following claim is made (this is at translationn from the Spanish): The wave function of ...
Miuder's user avatar
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1 vote
0 answers
75 views

How much more energy is released by a nuclear bomb than is required to create it? (Or is it a net loss?) [closed]

It seems like it takes a pretty substantial amount of energy to make a nuclear bomb. If you’re building a U-235 device, you need to run a huge array of gas centrifuges. If you’re making a plutonium ...
templatetypedef's user avatar
0 votes
2 answers
47 views

Relationship between gravitational force and fusion energy in stars [duplicate]

From what I understand, stars like our Sun constantly have a gravitational force on their surface due to their mass, which is balanced out by the fusion reactions taking place in the core of the Sun. ...
Waev's user avatar
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3 votes
1 answer
66 views

Finding the cross section for the proton-proton fusion reaction

I have been looking at the cross section $(\sigma)$ for the proton-proton collision in plasma. From what I have researched, the cross section cannot be found experimentally so it must be found through ...
Waev's user avatar
  • 33
-2 votes
1 answer
68 views

Can we use thermonuclear explosion to fight climate change? [closed]

Nuclear war can create nuclear winter, which is opposite to global warming. Can we detonate thermonuclear (because they don't create radiation) bombs somewhere to decrease global temperature?
Den4ik's user avatar
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0 votes
2 answers
48 views

Can Muon Catalyzed Fusion work in a Plasma?

From what I understand, muon catalyzed fusion works by injecting muons into the deuterium and tritium, which then they replace the electron shared between the hydrogen isotopes in a molecule, making ...
Barry Allen 's user avatar
0 votes
2 answers
27 views

Potential attained by a sphere under illumination

A silver sphere of radius 1 cm and work function 4.7 eV is suspended from an insulating thread in free-space. It is under continuous illumination of 200 nm wavelength light. As photoelectrons are ...
Nandini's user avatar
1 vote
0 answers
29 views

Can the transmutation of hydrogen to heavier isotopes be reversed without the loss of energy. This is transmutation, not fusion [closed]

In a high frequency plasma enriched with hydrogen, the transmutation to heavier H isotopes is; (n=neutron. p=proton. e=electron. E=energy) n + p = Deuterium + E out. D + p = Helium + E out. ...
gaia's user avatar
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3 votes
1 answer
66 views

How is the mass distributed in ordinary matter?

How is the mass distributed in ordinary matter? In the ordinary things around us, we know that most of the mass is in the cores of the atoms, the electrons around it contributing only a very small ...
Jos Bergervoet's user avatar
3 votes
1 answer
64 views

Can X-rays compress plasma for fusion?

I know in ICF fusion, generally lasers are used to generate X-rays inside a holhraum to compress a duetirium tritium fuel pellet until it generates fusion reactions. I was wondering if the same ...
Barry Allen 's user avatar
0 votes
2 answers
57 views

Artificial Nucleosynthesis

Is it possible to artificially turn hydrogen into helium, let's say, and then go from helium to lithium and so on? I know that fusion reactors do that by fusing deuterium and tritium. Could this be a ...
Aaa's user avatar
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0 votes
0 answers
26 views

Stable/metastable nuclei with excited nucleon states

I was reading about nucleon excited states such as the delta, and saw a passing comment that some nuclei may have a delta or N particle in place of an ordinary nucleon, and that said nuclei were “...
Steve Foster's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
53 views

Strength of a phase-transition

I'm currently studying neutron stars for a summer research project, and it uses the terms 'weak' and 'strong' transition for nuclear matter in its literature. Can someone explain (in terms that a ...
physicsnoob's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
50 views

Is it possible to change a radioactive isotope into a non-radioactive isotope?

Would it be possible to change a radioactive isotope of an element to a non-radioactive isotope by removing or adding neutrons? Just curious about this.
Thomas Bunton's user avatar

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