Questions tagged [maxwell-equations]

A set of four equations that define electrodynamics. They comprise the Gauss laws for the electric and magnetic fields, the Faraday law, and the Ampère law. Together, these equations uniquely determine the electric and magnetic fields of a physical system. DO NOT USE THIS TAG for the Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution, or the thermodynamical equations known as Maxwell's relations.

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Is there any correlation between mass-energy equivalence and Maxwell's 4th equation?

I wonder, how came in both equations proportionality constant is exactly $c^2$? $$c^2(\nabla \times B) = \partial E/\partial t$$ where $E$ - electric field $$c^2m = E$$ where $E$ - energy I am ...
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Displacement current - how to think of it

What is a good way to think of the displacement current? Maxwell imagined it as being movements in the aether, small changed of electric field producing magnetic field. I don't even understand that ...
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Maxwell's Equations-Relativity

How did Maxwell develop the magnetic field without relativity? Was it purely experimental? I don't see how else he would have developed any understanding for the magnetic field.
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Retrieving Maxwell's equations from the minimum action principle

I'm currently working at the start of Alexei Tsvelik's book Quantum Field Theory in Condensed Matter Physics. I'm kinda stumped on a few essential steps. Starting with the action: $$S = \int dt \int ...
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Uncertainty-principle and the Maxwell formalism of electromagnetic waves

An electromagnetic wave (like a propagating photon) is known to carry it's electric and magnetic field-vectors perpendicular and each depending on the differential change of the other thus "creating" ...
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Faraday's law - does the induced current's magnetic field affect the change in flux?

I've had this conceptual problem with Faraday's law and inductance for a while now. Take the example of a simple current loop with increasing area in a constant field (as in this answer). So Faraday'...
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Twistor Function for Coulomb Field

In an article by Penrose in Hughston and Ward "Advances in Twistor Theory", it is claimed that the twistor function $$ f(Z^\alpha) = \log{\frac{Z^1Z^2 - Z^0Z^3}{Z^2Z^3}}$$ produces an anti-self-dual ...
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Show that the plane of incidence is perpendicular to the surface of reflection

Is it possible to derive from the boundary conditions of the Maxwell equations for E and H, that the plane of incidence for an EM wave is perpendicular to the reflection surface? How? If not, what ...
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Electromagnetic inertia due to advanced radiation?

The scalar potential $\phi$ and vector potential $A$ at a distance $r$ from a charge $q$ are given approximately by $$\phi = \frac{q}{r}$$ $$\mathbf{A} = \frac{q\mathbf v}{r}$$ where the constants ...
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Magnetostatics of Current-Carrying wire

A question has been nagging at me about Faraday's Law as related to a wire with a constant current: If you have a circular loop of wire with some small resistivity, connected to a battery so that it ...
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Advanced Heaviside-Feynman formula implies electromagnetic inertia?

The Heaviside-Feynman formula (see Feynman Lectures vol I Ch.28, vol II Ch. 21) gives the electric and magnetic fields measured at an observation point $P$ due to an arbitrarily moving charge $q$ $$ \...
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Faraday's Law and magnetic monopoles

The magnetic monopoles does not exist which can be shown by $ \int {\vec{B} \cdot d\vec{A}} = 0 $. But in Faraday's Law of electromagnetic induction, we clearly show the EMF induced is the time rate ...
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Faraday's Law and Galilean Invariance

In Jackson's text he says that Faraday law is actually: $$ \oint_{\partial \Sigma} \mathbf{E} \cdot \mathrm{d}\boldsymbol{\ell} = -k\iint_{\Sigma} \frac{\partial \mathbf B}{\partial t} \cdot \mathrm{...
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Least-action classical electrodynamics without potentials

Is it possible to formulate classical electrodynamics (in the sense of deriving Maxwell's equations) from a least-action principle, without the use of potentials? That is, is there a lagrangian which ...
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Special Relativity: Transforming Maxwell's equations

I'm working through Einstein's original 1905 paper*, and I'm having trouble with the section on the transformation of Maxwell's equations from rest to moving frame. The paper proceeds as follows: Let ...
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What does this quote about the four dimensional divergence of an antisymmetric tensor mean?

In the beginning, God said that the four dimensional divergence of an antisymmetric second rank tensor equals zero and there was light. Can someone explain what is the meaning of this quote by Michio ...
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Electrodynamics and the Lagrangian density [duplicate]

Could anyone tell me what equations can I obtain from the Lagrangian density $${\cal L}(\phi,\,\,\phi_{,i},\,\,A_i, \dot A_i,\,\,A_{i,j})~=~\frac{1}{2}|\dot A+\nabla\phi|^2-\frac{1}{2}|\nabla \times ...
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What's so special about wave solutions of EM?

Maxwell's equations allow for wave solutions via oscillations between electric and magnetic field content. Couldn't we generate electric waves also if that solution didn't exists? Imagine there was ...
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Why do Maxwell's equations contain each of a scalar, vector, pseudovector and pseudoscalar equation?

Maxwell's equations, in differential form, are $$\left\{\begin{align} \vec\nabla\cdot\vec{E}&=~\rho/\epsilon_0,\\ \vec\nabla\times\vec B~&=~\mu_0\vec J+\epsilon_0\mu_0\frac{\partial\vec E}{\...
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Is the induced electric field due to time varying magnetic flux always circular?

According to Faraday's law, changing magnetic flux induces an electric field. Is that electric field always circular?
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Maxwell's Correction to Ampere's Law

I have not yet officially studied Electromagnetism but am trying to teach myself at the moment. I understand Maxwell's equations in the context of Magneto- and Electrostatics: they are equivalent, ...
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Faraday law, third Maxwell's equation in Mathematica

Three question about this equation: $ \displaystyle\nabla\times\mathbf{E}=-\frac{\partial \mathbf{B}}{\partial t} $ 1 If I solve this equation with Mathematica, I find the magnetic field $B(x,y,z,t),B:...
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Idea of precursors of the electro-magnetic waves

The idea of the material Maxwell equation is almost clear. But I'm curious about the idea that except for material equation the pure Maxwell equation should work, but in harder sense: more currents ...
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Are the Maxwell's equations enough to derive the law of Coulomb?

Are the 8 Maxwell's equations enough to derive the formula for the electromagnetic field created by a stationary point charge, which is the same as the law of Coulomb $$ F~=~k_e \frac{q_1q_2}{r^2}~? ...
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Divergence equations (Maxwell)

Let $\mathbf{E}(r,t),\mathbf{B}(r,t)$ be two vector fields (in $\mathbb{R}^3$), s.t. they satisfy fot $t=0$ the equations: $\nabla \cdot \mathbf{B}(r,0)=0.$ $\nabla \cdot \mathbf{E}(r,0)=\frac{\rho(...
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How do you find the magnetic field corresponding to an electric field?

If we are given the electric field $\vec E$ how can I find the corresponding magnetic field? I think I can use Maxwell's equations? In particular, $\nabla\times \vec E= -{\partial \vec B\over \partial ...
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Divergence of non conservative electric field

I'm looking for the proof that the 1st Maxwell equation is valid also on non conservative electric field. When we are talking about a electrostatic field, the equation is ok. We can apply the Gauss (...
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Deriving the Poynting Theorem

I am trying to derive the Poynting theorem. So far, I've only been able to narrow down which equations I think I'll need to do so. These are the equations: Maxwell's Equations: $$ \nabla\times{\bf E} ...
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Proof of equality of the integral and differential form of Maxwell's equation

Just curious, can anyone show how the integral and differential form of Maxwell's equation is equivalent? (While it is conceptually obvious, I am thinking rigorous mathematical proof may be useful in ...
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The necessity of the B field

It is fairly easy using basic special relativity to arrive at the conclusion that the magnetic force effect on nearby charges of wires carrying currents on nearby charges is only due to the length ...
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Invariance of Maxwell's Equations under inverting variables - Reference and use

Some months ago, an ArXiv paper mentioned in passing that Maxwell's Equations were invariant under reciprocating the variables, or at least this results in a dual set of Maxwell Equations. (Actually I ...
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Why doesn't magnetic monopole found in spin ice modify the Maxwell's Equations?

The magnetic monopole predicted by Dirac nearly a century ago(1) was found in spin ice as a quasi-particle(2). My question is: why doesn't the magnetic monopole found in spin ice modify Maxwell's ...
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Maxwell equations invariant under Lorentz transformation but not Galilean transformations

Why Maxwell equations are not invariant under Galilean transformations, but invariant under Lorentz transformations? What is the deep physical meaning behind it?
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Do Maxwell equeations change somehow after Higg's boson finding?

When I was in some physics -lesson, probably something to do with Quantum Physics -- the teacher said that certain Maxwell equations would change if the Higg's boson is found. It is also possible that ...
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Lorentz Invariance of Maxwell Equations

I am curious to see a simple demonstration of how special relativity leads to Lorentz Invariance of the Maxwell Equations. Differential form will suffice.
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Positive emf? What does positive emf mean?

Could someone please explain to me why we want to take the "magnitude" of the emf?
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why is advanced radiation absent?

the Lienard-Wiechert green functions have future and past null cones of radiation. Maxwell equations allow for a continuous range of mixtures between the retarded and advanced components, but we have ...
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Can light exist in $2+1$ or $1+1$ spacetime dimensions?

Spacetime of special relativity is frequently illustrated with its spatial part reduced to one or two spatial dimension (with light sector or cone, respectively). Taken literally, is it possible for $...
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Determine the flow and amplitude equation for thermal energy (with Del operator)

It is a question vector calculus and Maxwell's laws. I put it this way. Let's say, we are working in a $3$-Dimensional space ( e.g $x\cdot y\cdot z = 4\cdot3\cdot2$, a certain room/class of that size ...
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Solution to the Maxwell's equation

Question goes as Show that the solutions to the Maxwell's equations $$ \nabla \times \vec H = \frac 1 c \frac{\partial \vec E}{\partial t}+\frac {4\pi} c \vec J, \hspace{ 2 mm} \nabla \times \...
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Electron model under Maxwell's theory

I was not able to recall my memories, so: What is the formula that states the frequency of electrons revolving around nucleus is equal to the frequency of light (or photon) emitted (or radiated)? (I ...
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How can the Huygens-Fresnel principle be derived from the Maxwell equations?

The Huygens-Fresnel principle states that every point to which a luminous disturbance reaches becomes a source of a spherical wave. I have been trying to understand this considering a infinite screen ...
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Applying $\nabla\times\mathbf{B} = \mu_0\mathbf{J}$ in the presence of magnetic shielding

2012-06-13 - Revised question in experimental format (This is a thought experiment for which RF experts may have an immediate answer.) I'll assume (I could be wrong) the possibility of creating a ...
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Understanding Dynamic light scattering

I'd like to understand the physics of dynamic light scattering experiment. In particular I want to understand the basic relation between relaxation time $\tau_q$ and the diffusion coefficient $D$: $\...
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Gravimagnetic monopole and General relativity

Review and hystorical background: Gravitomagnetism (GM), refers to a set of formal analogies between Maxwell's field equations and an approximation, valid under certain conditions, to the Einstein ...
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How to interpret the continuity conditions in the PDEs (for example, Maxwell equations) originated in physics?

I am currently working on PDEs in physics, mostly Maxwell equations. I am a mathematics graduate student, and this question has been haunting me for years. In PDE theory, or more specifically the ...
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Why did Feynman's thesis almost work?

A bit of background helps frame this question. The question itself is in the last sentence. For his PhD thesis, Richard Feynman and his thesis adviser John Archibald Wheeler devised an astonishingly ...
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Can one introduce magnetic monopoles without Dirac strings?

To introduce magnetic monopoles in Maxwell equations, Dirac uses special strings, that are singularities in space, allowing potentials to be gauge potentials. A consequence of this is the quantization ...
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Does existence of magnetic monopole break covariant form of Maxwell’s equations for potentials?

Absence of magnetic charges is reflected in one of Maxwell's fundamental equations: $$\operatorname{div} \vec B = 0. \tag1$$ This equation allows us to introducte concept of vector potential: $$\vec B ...
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Maxwell in multiple dimensions: What happens to curl?

I read this answer a while ago, and while thinking about $\nabla$, I realized something. Since the cross product can be written as a determinant, in higher dimensions we require extra vector inputs. ...