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Questions tagged [matter]

Use this tag for questions related to mass and any materials that have volume and the objects they constitute.

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Dipole term in light-matter interaction

I have a question regarding the description of the term “dipole” in light-matter interactions. If I understand it correctly, there are 3 different things that one can declare as a dipole during light-...
Python_Coder's user avatar
-2 votes
0 answers
32 views

Is charge an intrinsic property of matter? [duplicate]

Is charge an intrinsic property of all the particles that comprise matter or is it an intrinsic property limited to certain fundamental particles only?? Or the question can be revised as "Does ...
Kunal Prajapat's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
62 views

What is the total mass-energy of baryonic matter?

From what I understand, conservation of energy does not apply to the total energy of the Universe, because it constantly expands and the new, created space has a constant non-zero energy of its own. ...
Quantum Wonder's user avatar
-1 votes
1 answer
44 views

What happens after a Photon pass-es through an element without causing any ElectronTransition? e.g. A Cube of Scanadium [closed]

Assuming:- No ElectronTransition ==> Photon passes through the atom. [right?] Longer Version In Words:- If a Photon doesn't have enough energy / has more energy than to trigger a ...
REYNEP's user avatar
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0 votes
0 answers
28 views

Entry equation for objects with different characteristics

The question, which weighs more, one pound of feathers or one pound of black hole, comes to mind. Each would react wildly different reentering Earth's atmosphere. In order to narrow the question: Is ...
user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
32 views

If I burn a log & contain all the matter, will the burned log weigh $E/c^2$ less than the unburned log, with $E$ being the energy from light & heat? [duplicate]

I understand that the change in weight would be tiny even to a physicist and nothing for any practical purpose. I am also not talking about smoke and water vapor. I am only referring to energy given ...
John Bonner's user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
47 views

Transition to Neutron Star

If we're asked to believe that the explosive aspect of a supernova results from a rebound of residual free falling matter off of the stellar core, shouldn't we also be asked to believe that transition ...
user avatar
-2 votes
1 answer
49 views

Do particles, quarks, atoms really move in space, or is it field disturbance-wave that moves in S-T with speed $c$? How particles move in S-T in QFT? [closed]

As I understand particles are localized fields (16fields+g). Can you explain on hydrogen atom example that moves in space vacuum. Does it really moving, or it is continious field disturbance ...
Codeded's user avatar
0 votes
3 answers
1k views

If matter cannot be created or destroyed, how were scientists able to "create" matter out of light? [duplicate]

It has been proven that scientists are able to "create" (using quotations because I do not understand if it is creating or not) matter from light in a particle collidor. How is this possible ...
Ryan Jadhav's user avatar
6 votes
3 answers
2k views

How can we detect matter waves?

The DeBroglie wavelength associated with a moving object is $$\lambda = \frac hp$$ For an object of mass 200 grams traveling with a velocity 20 m/s, it is in the order of $10^{-34}$ m. Is current ...
SuperSexyTrash's user avatar
-1 votes
1 answer
76 views

How is matter defined in physics? [duplicate]

I have heard matter defined as energy within a closed system and that any such closed system will have mass. Is this correct?
Gerry's user avatar
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0 answers
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Deriving $\mathrm d\omega/\mathrm dk = v$

I am reading Matter and Light by de Broglie and a little bit confused about how he deduced the equation of $v_g := \frac{\mathrm d\omega}{\mathrm dk} = v$ I understand that a wave that is static in ...
satoru kurita's user avatar
-1 votes
4 answers
125 views

Mass of an object [duplicate]

The mass is said to be matter content of an object. Is there any detailed definition of mass because the phrase , "matter content of an object" uses the word matter whose definition is ...
12jjsioe383's user avatar
0 votes
2 answers
122 views

How can we call matter to exist in wave form?

Matter behaves as "waves and particles". But if we say that the object is a wave it means it is present everewhere at the same time.
user avatar
-3 votes
2 answers
248 views

Why don't we fall through a chair when sitting? [duplicate]

I'm a high school drop out so excuse my grammar. I have done extensive reading in Astronomy and Cosmology, and came across this article With the title "Physicist Are Dumbfounded why we don't fall ...
Genesis1b4's user avatar
-3 votes
1 answer
91 views

In the Big Bang theory which came first, the vacuum or matter? [closed]

Simply what is our best estimation of what came first in the the first fraction of time of the BB? Was it the vacuum and then matter popped out from violent quantum vacuum fluctuations or matter then ...
Markoul11's user avatar
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1 vote
1 answer
51 views

Does a lump of baryonic matter have a well-defined particle number?

From reading about quantized electromagnetism, it seems that many forms of light (e.g. lasers) don't have well-defined numbers of photons, or in other words are superpositions of different number ...
Jamie S's user avatar
  • 115
0 votes
2 answers
104 views

Matter and Antimatter coexistence [closed]

Isn't it possible that matter and antimatter coexist? Recently, the ALPHA experiment at CERN has been looking into this topic. And I read about it from Fermilab's website, so they are saying how our ...
Curiosity_killing_me's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
90 views

Is matter in space, or independent from it, but interracts?

Considering the "hierarchy" of the Universe, or the world in a broad sense, as I understand it consists of matter, matter consists of "substance" (fermions), and fields and so on. ...
Stdugnd4ikbd's user avatar
3 votes
1 answer
102 views

What happens to metals and ceramics under high hydrostatic pressure?

What would happen to metals or ceramics (non-porous) when subjected to extremely high pressures (dozens of GPa) ? I feel like the sample will deform elastically only. So a ceramic object (think ...
Peter S.'s user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
61 views

How would I understand Hysteresis from scratch? [closed]

I wanted to learn about Hysteresis and I know the basic undergraduate level of 'Mechanical properties of matter". Can anyone please help?
B 2012 Arshad Khatib's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
93 views

Event after big bang that cause dark matter [closed]

When the universe was formed by the Big Bang, what was the event that made some matter visible to us, while some became dark matter?
My Essential Learning's user avatar
3 votes
0 answers
30 views

Does the event when two BH without polar jets merge, cause a short living polar jet on the newly formed BH?

Does the event when two BH without polar jets merge, cause a short living polar jet on the newly formed BH? As BH need infalling material to activate their polar bursts does the BH falling into ...
Krešimir Bradvica's user avatar
8 votes
3 answers
2k views

What happens to matter at extreme temperatures?

Water at absolute zero is, I suppose, ice. At room temperature it's water. At a certain point steam. What happens to it as we approach infinite temperature? (what we might call "absolute" ...
Jon's user avatar
  • 191
0 votes
2 answers
93 views

What earthbound experiments show gravitation is general to all matter, and not just towards the earth?

I was debating a flat earther and predictably it turned into a debate on gravitation. He said as far as we know, things fall down to the earth, not because its towards the greatest mass. The ...
Hisham's user avatar
  • 1,821
0 votes
0 answers
50 views

Does CP symmetry dictates that a particle and its antiparticle behave the same when moving in opposite directions and how can I observe CP asymmetry?

I have started reading in particle physics very recently. I have been reading a bit about tau particles, and I came across the idea of CP symmetry and how it’s violation may present an explanation for ...
Belal Bahaa's user avatar
1 vote
2 answers
54 views

If the electromagnetic force did not exist before it froze out, how could there have been a meaningful distinction between matter and antimatter?

If electrons and positrons are identical except for their opposing charges, what was the nature of these particles before the EM force separated out?
blacktopshaman's user avatar
2 votes
3 answers
174 views

Physical Significance of Frequency of matter waves

So, in our book there was an additional exercise part and this question baffles me:- Q. Answer the following questions:- The energy and momentum of an electron are related to the frequency and ...
robustrimo's user avatar
0 votes
2 answers
265 views

Are the Einstein field equations the Equations of Motion for matter?

I'm learning general relativity and eventually I hope to understand the Einstein field equations $$G_{\mu\nu}=\kappa T_{\mu\nu}$$ in full mathematical detail. I wonder whether they describe the ...
Gere's user avatar
  • 1,477
0 votes
2 answers
98 views

Mass matter, energy and "massless matter"

This is perhaps a rather silly question, or rather a matter of convention, but I would like to hear arguments about the appropriateness of certain definitions. Traditionally, in chemistry and in pre-...
Davius's user avatar
  • 1,640
-3 votes
5 answers
213 views

Can some regions of space (independent of size), be completely devoid of matter?

Before answering the question, keep in mind that I am a second year Biology student, with no experience in studying Physics and a very basic understanding of Mathematics. However, I have some ...
Growing6884's user avatar
2 votes
2 answers
105 views

How does some matter prevent other matter from reaching a lower potential energy state?

Before answering the question, keep in mind that I am a second year Biology student, with no experience in studying Physics and I consider myself 'mathematically illiterate'. An example of matter ...
Growing6884's user avatar
6 votes
1 answer
354 views

How would the universe look like without matter?

I was wondering how the universe would look like if it would have been perfectly symmetrical in terms of matter and antimatter. If I understand correctly, there would be no "particle" but ...
Redirectk's user avatar
  • 357
1 vote
5 answers
207 views

Why is all matter in the universe, not found at its lowest state of potential energy? [closed]

Preface: it may be of interest that I am a second year Biology student, with no experience in studying Physics and a very basic understanding of Mathematics. ...
Growing6884's user avatar
2 votes
2 answers
715 views

Why does de Broglie wavelength work?

The equation is $\lambda=h/(mv)$. I am currently learning electron diffraction and have learnt about how de Broglie studied on the wave-particle duality of matter such as electrons. We were given the ...
Muffin's user avatar
  • 37
1 vote
0 answers
52 views

Expansion of the Universe inside mattar [duplicate]

When talking about the expansion of the universe we usually refer to the Friedman equations so we assume homogeneous and isotropic solution to Einstein field equation which is true on cosmological ...
ziv's user avatar
  • 1,734
0 votes
0 answers
32 views

Gravitational interaction between antimatter particles [duplicate]

Is there some positron-positron collision experiments? Is the gravitational interaction between antimatter particles the same as between ordinary matter particles?
Samuel Charberet's user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
45 views

Have physicists ever consider the possibility that if spacetime can be crumpled the crumpling itself CREATES matter? (I'm not a physicist) [duplicate]

This following example explains my question. Let's take a spread out bed sheet, which represents spacetime. At the center of the bed sheet, I start to crumple/wrap the fabric of the bed sheet. The ...
Igor Giusti's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
184 views

Why can gases pass through each other while solids cannot?

Solids cannot (generally speaking) pass through each other, while gases can. The first answer to this question points to the electromagnetic force and the Pauli Exclusion Principle as the reasons that ...
kuzzooroo's user avatar
  • 287
1 vote
2 answers
146 views

Spin of electron and photon emitted

How does the spin state of the electron affect the polarisation of the light emitted? I am looking for a description in a detailed mathematical aspect, any suggestions on books ?
I'm Batman's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
119 views

How do you get energy from matter with 100% efficiency?

Using $E=mc^2$, how can you make some energy from matter 100% efficiently? For example, if I gave you about 1 kg of mass you could get a whopping (9*10^16) joules of energy with 100% efficiency. The ...
160IQguy's user avatar
1 vote
0 answers
92 views

Does atomic particles have smell? [closed]

Do atomic particles like Sulphur or Hydrogen have their own distinct smell? Is the distinctive smell of Hydrogen Sulphide a combination of the smells of Hydrogen and Sulphur ? If not, then how do ...
user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
83 views

Is a Torricellian vacuum a perfect vaccum(devoid of any kind of matter)?

Is a Torricellian vacuum as such in a mercury barometer a perfect vacuum i.e. is it devoid of any kind of matter? If not , then what does it contain and why? As a 9th grade student , it is mentioned ...
user336972's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
37 views

"Lateral Extension" of a matter wave

This question may be stupid, but I would be very grateful for an answer. As far as I understand, a matter wave has a wavelength and an amplitude. The amplitude does NOT extend in space, it simply ...
Christoph's user avatar
2 votes
1 answer
93 views

Total number of particles in the universe (according to Planck Surveyor measures, 2018)

Recently, Marco Ajello et al. (2018) has estimated the total number of photons in the whole observable universe as: $$N_\gamma \approx 4\cdot 10^{84}.$$ On the other hand, the ratio of baryons to ...
Davius's user avatar
  • 1,640
0 votes
1 answer
94 views

Does Black Hole requires a material medium to be formed?

Does Black Hole requires Material medium to be formed or it can be formed without any medium (Vacuum)? as anything which can be thrown with the speed of light can form a Black Hole and light can also ...
πααρτθ Σαρθι's user avatar
-4 votes
3 answers
412 views

Has spacetime some physical properties?

"Spacetime isn't a physical object, it's a mathematical structure (manifold with metric) that tells us how to calculate the distance between objects, so matter can't slide over spacetime." (...
JanG's user avatar
  • 1,948
-3 votes
2 answers
267 views

Does anyone really know how dark energy/matter works?

If dark energy has no physical interaction with normal matter but it does interact with dark matter, wouldn't that cause an interaction with normal matter through its interaction with dark matter and ...
JA86's user avatar
  • 1
0 votes
1 answer
86 views

Why not say a scalar potential as a function representing the matter itself? [duplicate]

[Question] Why not say a scalar potential as a function representing the matter itself? At first glance, this idea seems to make the duality, which is the biggest difficulty in understanding quantum ...
SOQEH's user avatar
  • 85
0 votes
2 answers
113 views

If there was an infinite amount of matter at big bang to form an infinite universe how it was possible for a so huge amount of matter to expand?

If there was an infinite amount of matter at big bang to form an infinite universe how it was possible for a so huge amount of matter to expand? Is it better to think that the universe is spatially ...
jbradvi9's user avatar
  • 467

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