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Questions tagged [mass-energy]

The special-relativistic relation connecting energy with mass, $ E^2 - (m c^2)^2= (pc)^2 $. May be used to provide accounting constraints in energy and momentum, both conserved in total, even in reactions where $m$ is not.

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Relativistic Mass when Viewed from Different Frames of Reference

I understand relativistic mass and the equations underpinning it. My question deals with how to calculate relativistic mass when an object is viewed from different frames of reference. Consider a ...
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Effect of gravity when mass is converted to energy

Let there be two hydrogen atoms having 1.1 mass each. We use solar fusion to convert the two hydrogen plasma to helium with a mass of 2 and 0.2 gamma radiation. Before the fusion process gravity was ...
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How are these two definitions of energy related/derive from each other? [on hold]

How are these two definitions of energy related/derive from each other: $$E = \frac{mc^2} {\sqrt{(1 - v^2/c^2)}}$$ vs. $$E = \sqrt{m^2c^4 + p^2c^2}~?$$ Both equations express the relation between ...
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Is the acceleration of two objects with different temperature same with the same force? [on hold]

$F=ma$ is not the case at relativistic speeds. But what is the total energy including mass which resists against force?
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What is meant in mass' definition 'resistance to acceleration'? [on hold]

Wikipedia: Mass is both a property of a physical body and a measure of its resistance to acceleration What does this mean? I know of the $E=mc^2$ formula. I think, the energy required to '...
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information theory and energy mass relationship (E=mc2) - just a hunch … [on hold]

I was walking on the street the other day and thought to myself, maybe E=mc2 can be derived from information theoretic principles. I did not do too much work on this, just want to brainstorm a bit. ...
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63 views

Does a non-spherical black hole have distribution of mass like an empty body, solid body or pointed object?

Suppose a non-spherical (say, rotating or under distortion of another gravity source) black hole. Does it have its mass distributed as if all the mass was on its surface, or as if the mass were ...
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What is more massive, Proton, standard Hydrogen?

If you consider the classical states of hydrogen, one in which the electron is rotating at an orbital distance of $r$ and then take $\lim_{r\to\infty}$ one obtains that the $r_\infty$ state has more ...
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Is mass-energy conversion contradicting energy conservation? [duplicate]

If mass can be transformed into energy, and energy transformed back into mass, isn't this at odds with the law of conservation of energy? Because this would mean, that in theory, it would be possible ...
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Is the relativistic increase in (relativistic) mass same for a freely falling body as compared to body which is accelerated to the same velocity?

For a similar mass either falling toward a black hole or accelerated by a force is there a comparable increase in mass for similar velocity? Suppose a mass of one kilogram is accelerated to 99% of the ...
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How does inertia work at the particle level?

I've read recently that the mass of a proton is mostly not given by the Higgs mechanism. But rather it's given by the energy of quarks moving around inside the proton and gluons and other internal ...
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How can the quanta of electromagnetism be photons if they have no mass? [closed]

I thought charge only existed when mass was present. Does this mean String Theory hypothesizes photons having charge?
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126 views

Why is $E=mc^2$ and not $E=m\frac{c^2}{2}$?

Kinetic energy for a moving object is the integral of force with respect to distance, often given as: $$E=m\frac{v^2}{2}.$$ This would imply that for mass moving at the speed of light, the kinetic ...
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1answer
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Does relativistic mass really increase with velocity? [closed]

Suppose there are two masses on the ground $M$ and $m$. The distance is $d$. So according to newton's law the gravitational force between them is $F=\frac{GMm}{d^2}$. Now suppose that I am going ...
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4answers
90 views

Why does the warm air rises up?

Warm air has more energy than cold air. This means that according to the Einstein equation $E = mc^2$ the warmer air has a greater mass than the cold one. Why is the warm air rising, if it has a ...
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When a particle keeps “accelerating” near the speed of light, is the energy gained expressed in linearly gained impulse, or relativistic mass? [duplicate]

When a particle keeps "accelerating" near the speed of light, is the energy gained expressed in linearly gained impulse, or relativistic mass?
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What stops a free electron from 'using' part of its own mass to generate radiation?

The explanation I've read on why a free electron can't emit a photon goes like this: Let there be a free electron of mass $m$ moving with constant velocity $v$. We may enter a new reference frame ...
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1answer
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Newton's 2nd law of motion and mass-energy equation [closed]

According to the mass-energy equation $E=mc^2$, so $m=\frac{E}{c^2}$, but according to Newton 2nd law of motion $F=ma$, so $m=\frac{F}{a}$. Therefore $\frac{E}{c^2}=\frac{F}{a}$, or $E=\frac{Fc^2}{a}$....
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59 views

Binding Energy and Energy Mass Equivalence

Consider a neutral atom. An external force acts on one of its valence electron so that it brings this valence electron to infinity away from the rest of the atom. The electron's kinetic energy does ...
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Does beta radiation create mass? [duplicate]

We are talking about radiation in class, and from what we've learned it seems like beta radiation creates mass. As a neutron has u in mass and protons also have u in mass, won't the mass of a ...
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1answer
80 views

Are particles an abstraction of energy, or their matters do indeed exist?

I'm trying to understand from where the first particles in quantum mechanics came from, and while doing research I got this information from an article about the origin of matter: In the beginning,...
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Do the inertial mass and gravitational mass of an object depend on the frame of reference?

My understanding is that the "relativistic mass" of an object means any of the following three quantities (which are all identical): The "mass-energy", as defined by the formula $m = E / c^2$. The ...
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2answers
124 views

What happens if we exert more force on an object which would be travelling at near maximum light speed? [duplicate]

If we exert force on an object which would be travelling at near light speed, to an extent to make it move greater than speed of light in vacuum, what would happen? If object doesn't move faster than ...
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2answers
72 views

How does matter turn to energy at the atomic level? [duplicate]

When matter is converted to energy by means of $E=mc^2$, it produces quite a lot of "energy". What I am having trouble understanding is exactly how the matter is transformed to energy at the atomic ...
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Mass-energy in relativity

If an object's mass, when measured in its frame of reference (even if that frame is moving), is invariant, then why does it require more and more energy to accelerate it? I can understand this when ...
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1answer
38 views

Does potential energy increase inertial mass of system?

For example, we have a ball with mass m lying on the Earth. Then we lift it to a height h. So, now system Earth-ball have potential energy $E_p = mgh$. From Mass–energy equivalence system got $mass = \...
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1answer
87 views

Is the mass of Tachyons real or imaginary?

I have always considered quantities like mass, charge, momentum etc to be completely real quantities as them being imaginary doesn't make much sense to me. But for tachyons to exist, they should have ...
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3answers
92 views

How to derive derive De-Broglie's wavelength equation?

I was only yesterday learning about the De-Broglie equation $$\lambda = h/p, $$ I thought I understood it until I came across a question similar to this Now I always knew that photons don't have any ...
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2answers
131 views

What constitutes the mass of electron?

Electron has mass of $9.10938356 \times 10^{-31}$ kilograms. Since an electron has mass, it should be made of some material. I understood that electron is nothing but negative charge. If this is the ...
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Using $E=mc²$ to simplify particle KE calculations?

In an old examination paper I found a question asking for the ratio between the KE of a nucleus and the KE of an alpha particle emitted from the nucleus. For reference here is the question and answer ...
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1answer
165 views

What do the small terms in the series expansion of relativistic energy mean?

Through the fabulous Feynman Lectures of Physics and the introduction of relativistic mass, Richard Feynman made a link between the increase in kinetic energy of a heated molecule of gas, and its ...
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1answer
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How much energy does a neutrino have? [closed]

Neutrinos were theorized when some energy was noticed to be 'missing' from beta decays, correct? But until recently, they were thought to be massless. So, how much energy does a single neutrino have?...
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1answer
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Binding energy of the nucleus

In a reaction U235+1n->141 Ba +92Kr +(3) 1n+200MeV, the energy released (200Mev) is of one atom or of 6.023*10^23 atoms?
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What is possible intuitive explanation of inelastic relativistic collsion?

In classical mechanics, we say an inelastic collision happens when some energy is transferred to heat and noise without changing the total sum of momentum. However, in special relativity, every ...
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3answers
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Wave and relativity [closed]

From Wikipedia, "In physics, a wave is a disturbance that transfers energy through matter or space, with little or no associated mass transport." But Einstein said that energy equals mass so if a wave ...
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Are the units of energy the same in higher dimensions?

In 3 spatial dimensions, $$[E] = [ML^2 T^{-2}]$$ Would it change in higher dimensions? If yes, then what would be the dimensions for 4 spatial dimensions?
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How is a photon converted into matter?

Photon is a mass less particle but still it can be converted into matter which has mass. I know the formula $E=mc^2$, but is there some kind of force or particle which converts photons into matter, ...
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1answer
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Does infinite mass exist? [closed]

So when I search up if infinite mass exists, google provides me with a source that states infinite relativistic mass does exist at the speed of light which is why it is impossible to ever reach to ...
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1answer
75 views

Useful Momentum Relation for Relativistic Particles [closed]

I've seen that $$p = \sqrt{(\frac{E}{c})^2-(mc)^2} = \frac{1}{c} \sqrt{{E_k}^2 + 2 E_0 E_k}$$ for a relativistic particle on hyperphysics and in my modern physics class. I understand that the first ...
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2answers
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Are matter and energy dependent on each other? [closed]

If matter creates energy and energy creates matter can one exist without the other?
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97 views

Energy vs. mass in photons

I am confused about the following: Mass is condensed energy. A photon has no mass, but it has a degree (of quantised) energy. Does that mean it does not have enough energy for it to be condensed ...
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The relation between mass, inertia and energy

I have trouble understanding the following concept: I learnt that mass is a measure of inertia, and that seemed logical enough. Yet separately I learnt that mass is a form of condensed energy. If ...
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2answers
89 views

Distortion of space and time

What will happen to the distorted space and time around a mass when it is converted into energy? Will it back to its original configuration (0 gravity)? Or space time oscillates? Or anything else
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The speed of light and the increase of relativistic mass [duplicate]

The speed of light theory predicts that as things travel faster their mass increases, so I think we if we look at a plane accelerating from mach one to mach two and measure the relativistic mass of ...
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1answer
67 views

Relativistic mass of photon [duplicate]

What is the relativistic mass of one photon, i.e. what is $N$ here: $10^{-N}$ kg?
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1answer
76 views

Can $E=mc^2$ be used to find the energy stored in larger objects?

I know that $E=mc^2$ can be used to find the total energy of a particle but can it also be applied to larger things? Say a chair with a velocity $0$ $\frac{m}s$ and rest mass $10$ $kg$? Would the ...
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1answer
80 views

How does black hole suck light? [duplicate]

I was asked the same by my friend. I said that gravitational attraction also occurs for high energy particles . My friend said photon is not so very high energy particle which I found on net. He ...
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1answer
38 views

Matter - antimatter collision [duplicate]

I have read that when matter and antimatter collide they just cancel out each other with the emmision of bright light. But doesn't it violate law of conservation of mass? If the the atoms dissapear ...
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1answer
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Where will the charge of a mass will go (having some net charge) when completely converted to energy?

All my confusion began while thinking of can charge be related to energy. Now Coulomb's law state that two body having some charges apply forces on each other which is true. And according to Newton $...
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1answer
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relativity: accelerating a flywheel

Let's say we have a pair of flywheels rotating in opposite directions and they're inside a black box so that maybe we don't know that's what's inside, and we accelerate the box in the direction of ...