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Questions tagged [interactions]

Particle interactions are changes in the nature, number, or state of several particles, usually at a specific space-time point, underlying dynamics. They are represented by special "field interaction terms" in quantum field theory and normally entail interchanges of energy, momentum, and sundry quantum numbers. They include scattering, and particle creation and annihilation.

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Is glass considered as a linear optical medium?

My research, which is mainly related to communication, involves the use of optical sources (mainly lasers). However, my background in photonics and optics is not yet solid, so my question might be a ...
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Can weakness of gravity explore new dimensions?

Since gravitational force is weakest force out of the four fundamental fources at the microscopic level. Is it possible that gravitational force is strong in a particular direction at a new ...
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From a cross section to a probability

This is homework problem: Given the cross-section of a neutrino-electron scattering, what is the probability for a solar neutrino to scatter with a electron as it goes through the center of the Earth? ...
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How do magnetic objects exhibit attraction/repulsion across empty space?

Magnets will attract or repel over a distance before physically touching each other. What makes this effect possible? My best guess is that the forces generated by the angular momentum of the ...
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Why will two bubbles floating on water surface attract each other?

Two identical bubbles floating on water surface will form clumps, according to the "cheerio effect". But what's the detail about the force? It's necessary to calculate the shape of water surface, in ...
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Five-component field

Recently I was reading about 5-component field $(\varphi , \psi_{\mu})$, for which $$ \hat {p}^{\mu} \varphi = mc\psi^{\mu}, \quad \hat {p}_{\mu}\psi^{\mu} = mc\varphi . $$ This field refers to the ...
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Range Of An Interaction

Why is the Compton wavelength $\lambda_c=\frac{\hbar}{mc}$ used as a sensible measure for the range of an interaction, where $m$ is the mass of the corresponding mediator?
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Do molecular bounded systems shield or reduce neutron cross-sections?

When talking about neutron cross-sections, literature is usually investigating isolated cases of Neutron + Atom. Here, the abundance of hydrogen is dominating neutron fluxes through material. I ...
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How do electrons and photons interact?

Two electrons, or an electron and a proton, interact with each other because of the Coulomb potential, which can also be seen in the Schrödinger equation (which is the equation that describes the ...
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Diagonalizing Van der Waals Hamiltonian

In Kittel's Solid State Physics, he attempts to find the energy exchange due to the van der Waals interaction. He starts by writing the hamiltonian: two oscillators with coordinates $x_1$ and $x_2$ $$...
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Exotic coupling

I have encountered the minimal coupling between a field and charges before $$H = \frac{1}{2m}(p-qA)^2,$$ whereby I am considering the classical case. The description minimal leads me to ask if ...
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What defines the interaction strength of a particle (massless or not) with matter?

Generally, talking about photons, the shorter the wavelength, the higher the interaction with matter. I doubt that I really understand why this happens. What about other massless particles? And ...
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Feynman rule for deriative interaction: an example

Consider a theory for a finite number of real scalar fields $\phi _i$ with interaction terms of the form $$ -\lambda _{ijk}\phi _i\partial _\mu \phi _j\partial ^\mu \phi _k, $$ with the sum over $i,j,...
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Which interaction is the responsible for long-range magnetism?

I am taking a course on solid state physics. The class is mostly based on Ashcroft-Mermin's "Solid State Physics". Yesterday I sat for an exam and there was a question I couldn't answer: "Which ...
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Relativity and photon interactions

A particle's interaction (with anything it can interact with) can be thought of as it making a measurement of the physical quantity associated with the interaction, (e.g. electric field in case of the ...
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Why can interactions be neglected for the Integer Quantum Hall effect?

Though the statement is made often, I've not seen any justification for neglecting electron-electron (Coulomb) interactions in the fully filled $\nu =1$ IQH state. I would highly appreciate if someone ...
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Potential in Quantum field theory

I studied free particle field like Dirac field and Klein Gordon field. My question is about interaction. How can I put a potential term in the Lagrangian density? $\mathcal{L} =\frac{1}{2}\partial_\...
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272 views

Why Does Knife Cuts?

Why is it that when we cut bread or anything else with a knife, the less effective way to cut it is just by pressing on it from above? And is it true that we can cut things with knife because of the ...
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In QFT, how can it be shown that the field out, ${\phi_{out}}$, is a free field if the field in, ${\phi_{in}}$, is a free field?

In the Dirac picture of QFT interacting fields, if the field in, ${\phi_{in}}$, is a free field, then I know that the field out, ${\phi_{out}}$ should also be a free field. How can this be shown? Let'...
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Definition: Coupling [closed]

What does it mean to say that 2 fields are coupled? More generally, what does "coupling" mean?
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Adiabatic theorem in the regime of quantum optics

I am wondering whether there is a version of adiabatic theorem in the regime of quantum optics. My understanding of quantum optics involves with the interaction between photon and atom. This ...
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Are fundamental forces conservative?

I wonder whether fundamental forces are conservative. First of all, I'm not sure if we can talk about conservative forces, since to study electromagnetism, weak and strong interactions we need QFT. ...
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368 views

Non-local Lagrangian contact interaction

Conside a contact interaction given by a delta function on their worldlines. Use a gauge fixed Lagrangian for two point particles in terms of their proper times $t$ and $t^{\prime}$. Is it possible to ...
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Deriving Feynman Rules (with the presence of a gluon field strength tensor)

If I have a Lagrangian of the form: $$ \mathcal{L} = k \bar{\psi} \varepsilon^{\mu \nu} \lambda^a \phi G^a_{\mu \nu} + h.c. $$ [where $\phi, \psi$ are fermions, $\lambda^a$ are Gellmann matrices, $\...
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Renormalizibility by power counting

When testing a theory for its renormalizability, in practice one always calculates the mass dimension of the coupling constants $g_i$. If $[g_i]<0$ for any $i$ the theory is not renormalizable. I ...
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1answer
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How fair is it to say that all chemistry arises from failures of the ideal gas law?

I was reading here about how the ideal gas law assumes point masses and non-interaction. Is it fair to say that all chemistry arises from failures of that? Of course, such a sweeping generalization ...
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What is the cause the light is affected by gravity? [duplicate]

I know that photons have no mass and that a photons exist only moving at the speed of light. So what is the cause that a massive astronomical object can bend a ray of light? I have two thoughts, but I ...
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Vacuum to vacuum transition amplitude [duplicate]

I have two questions about Vacuum to vacuum transition amplitude. Can any particle stay in $|0\rangle$? I was studying this topic from Srednicki's QFT book. He writes in eq.$(6.22)$ $$\langle0|0 \...
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1answer
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Interacting particles

We are familiar with the grand partition function for the grand canonical ensemble. This makes me wonder: what kinds of modifications would be required if the particles interacted? Thanks.
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Gell-Mann Low Theorem and Vacuum Energy

I know that the sum of vacuum bubbles can be related to the Vacuum energy, but I'm trying to understand how this follows from the Gell-Mann Low theorem/equation. My question will use equations from ...
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Why do irrelevant operators require infinitely many counterterms?

As far as I understand it, in the Wilsonian picture of renormalization, we view a theory as having some fixed cutoff and bare couplings, and integrate out high-momentum modes to understand what ...
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How to measure a solid-solid surface energy?

Many techniques exist to measure the surface energy between a liquid and a liquid or a liquid and a gas (see e.g. the wiki page). Methods to measure the surface energy between a solid and a fluid are ...
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Strong interaction and the Lagrangian for electromagnetic interaction

The Lagrangian for electromagnetic field has the following expression: $$ L = -\frac{1}{c^{2}}A_{\alpha}j^{\alpha} - \frac{1}{8 \pi c}(\partial_{\alpha} A_{\beta})(\partial^{\alpha}A^{\beta}) $$ (I ...
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Range of forces from mass of force carrier?

Why is $\frac{\hbar}{mc}$ a good estimate of the range of the four forces, where $m$ is the mass of the carrier particle of the force? Inputting the pion mass gives $1.4\ \mathrm{fm}$ for the hadronic ...
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A strange particle, $X$, decays in the following way: $X → π^– + p$. State what interaction is involved in this decay

A strange particle, $X$, decays in the following way: $X → π^– + p$. State what interaction is involved in this decay. I know the answer to be weak interaction, but why is it weak interaction? What ...
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How are forces related to decays?

How are decays related to forces, what is meant by particle X decays through the, say, strong force? The way I understand forces is by how they change the acceleration of particles with the right ...
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Question on the Gell-Mann Low equation

Question on the Gell-Mann Low Equation. In this paper, http://arxiv.org/abs/1205.3365, page 21, the author argues that if $t\to\infty(1-i\epsilon)$, all the terms in equation (193), $$ \mathrm e^{-iH(...
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1answer
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Interpretation of derivative interaction term in QFT

I am trying to understand what a term like $$ \mathcal{L}_{int} = (\partial^{\mu}A )^2 B^2 $$ with $A$ and $B$ being scalar fields for instance means. I understand how to draw an interaction term in ...
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Interpretation of an “interaction” term

In QFT a polynomial (of degree >2) in the fields is said to be an interaction term, Ex.: $\lambda\phi^4$. Question Is it possible to give an interpretation to terms like $\frac{1}{\phi^n}$? (for $n\...
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Long/short-range interaction

A potential of the form $r^{-n}$ is often considered long-range, while one that decays exponentially is considered short-range. Is this characterization simply relative/conventional, or is there a ...
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Why $\lambda\phi^4$ theory, where $\lambda>0$, is not bounded from below?

Why the following interaction, in QFT, $$\displaystyle{\cal L}_{\rm int} ~=~\frac{\lambda}{4!}\phi^4$$ where $\lambda$ is positive, represents a theory that is unstable (or unbounded from below as it ...
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Interaction speed between electric charges and magnetic materials

Einstein said that the speed of a matter in universe cannot exceed the speed of light. Is it correct for electric force transmission speed from one electric charge to other one? What is transmission ...
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1answer
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Interacting system and relaxation times

I got a question I'm not sure how to state precisely or is it even valid. Any help is most welcomed. I stripped the question of all details because I wanted to emphasize my problem, but should ...
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Macroscopic laws which haven't been derived from microscopic laws

Can you think of examples where a macroscopic law coexists with a fully known microscopic law, but the former hasn't been derived from the latter (yet)? Or maybe a rule of thumb, which works but hasn'...
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Intuitive picture for spin-fluctuations contribution to specific heat of He3

Usually when discussing Fermi liquid theory, it is stated that due to the quasiparticles effectively behaving like a free electron gas with effective mass, the specific heat is linear in $T$ at small ...
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How do magnets work?

I've read a classbook on the field theory (including EM): it perfectly describes quantitive patterns in EM-theory, but I have no luck understanding how and why it works. I mean, magnetic substances ...
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Interacting classical strings?

May classical strings be interacting? I would guess no, I can not see any way to break a classical closed string in two of them (the "pants" diagram); but maybe I'm missing something.
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Why are there 4 Dimensions and 4 Fundamental Forces?

Is it a coincidence that there are four fundamental forces and four spacetime dimensions ? Does a universe with three spacetime dimension contain four fundamental forces? Can magnetism be realized in ...
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What's the meaning of the coupling change after a renormalization (in the 1-dim Ising Model)?

What does it mean that after the theory (1-dim Ising model here, but the question is general) is renormalized one time and $g_i\rightarrow g_i'$, that the couplings are weaker, even if the theory ...
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ALL “forces” as manifestations of properties of space-time

I apologize if this seems like a quack question, but I need some insights by those who know much more than me in Physics. Anyway, the gravitational "force" (not really a force) is a manifestation of ...