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Questions tagged [gravitational-waves]

For questions about the propagation of waves carried by space-time, for instance as described by general relativity. Not to be confused with gravity waves, such as ocean surface waves.

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What Does Feynman Mean When He Says Amplitude and Probabilities?

In Feynman lectures on gravitation section 1.4, he tries to debate over whether one should quantize the gravitation or not. He provides a two-slit diffraction experiment with a gravity detector, which ...
Ting-Kai Hsu's user avatar
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31 views

Why are laser beams not affected by gravitational waves in Michelson interferometer? [duplicate]

Michelson interferometers are used to detect gravitational waves. This means two laser beams are sent in long arms and reflected at the end. Usually, they annihilate each other and no signal is ...
OpenSourceOrDie's user avatar
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51 views

The data file of the LISA Interferometer results

How to extract the data of the strain versus frequency plot of the Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA): Figure (2) in this paper: https://arxiv.org/abs/1702.00786 The paper doesn't contain any ...
Dr. phy's user avatar
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How to plot the curve of the gravitational wave energy density giving the data of the strain versus frequency

I want to plot the curve of energy density ($\Omega$) of the gravitational waves versus frequency that are predicted by the Einstein telescope. But in the ET pages: https://moscow.sci-hub.se/4444/...
Dr. phy's user avatar
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6 votes
1 answer
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Extreme Mass Ratio Inspirals and GWs cycles

I was reading through the following paper GRMHD study of accreting massive black hole binaries in astrophysical environment: A review. Therein, we have the following image It is not quite clear how ...
RKerr's user avatar
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Gravitational Wave Impact on Connected Particles

We understand that when a gravitational wave passes through a setup with two freely falling particles, it causes them to oscillate and change the distance between them. However, if the two particles ...
TheFyziker's user avatar
5 votes
2 answers
2k views

What does "DC" mean in gravitational physics?

I have came across a few works in gravitational physics using the term "DC" without further explanation of its meaning. For example, consider Strominger's 1703.05448, which states in p. 2 ...
Níckolas Alves's user avatar
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What is the difference between Hawking radiation and a black hole laser?

While reading this paper (https://arxiv.org/abs/1409.6550), I got a little bit puzzled: what is the difference between Hawking radiation and a black hole laser? Is it the same thing? From my ...
Andris Erglis's user avatar
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Do particle physics experiments need to take a possible gravitational wave background into account?

As I understand gravitational waves, we can barely detect them, because their strength is so small. On the other hand, they are presumably able to move individual particles like electrons. Does this ...
Allure's user avatar
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7 votes
1 answer
744 views

Can gravity radiate?

In electromagnetism, when a charge accelerates, it emits radiation. We know this because we can write the retarded potentials, apply $\vec E=- \nabla V-\frac{\partial \vec{A}}{\partial t}$ and $\vec B=...
Lagrangiano's user avatar
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3 votes
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Solving the wave equation of a tensor $h_{\mu\nu} = (1/2) (e_\mu e_\nu + e_\nu e_\mu)$

It is known that the solution to the wave equation for a tensor $$ \square h_{\mu\nu} = 0 $$ is $$ h_{\mu\nu}(\vec{x}, t) = \int \frac{d^3k}{(2\pi)^3} \sum_{\lambda=+,\times} \left( \epsilon_{\mu\nu}^{...
Anon21's user avatar
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Describing force accumulation trend of an infinite volume with evenly distributed radiative sources

I am looking for confirmation if I've built my equation properly. My goal is to describe the change in force over time at a given point if evenly distributed radiators (in-phase or cumulative energy/...
WhetScience's user avatar
2 votes
1 answer
58 views

Acceleration at peak of a gravitational wave

The amplitude of the strongest gravitational wave signal detected by LIGO sofar can maybe be expressed as an acceleration? If so, what would the numerical value be (in m/s^2)? I would like to compare ...
Wouter M.'s user avatar
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Why does the wavelength of gravitational waves increase with larger energy?

Gravitational and electromagnetic waves are quite similar, as both are fundamental force waves that travel at the speed of light and have no limit to their range, but when it comes to electromagnetism,...
Quantum Wonder's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
70 views

Using Gravitational Waves as an observation technique

In theory, could you possibly use Gravitational Waves as a way to detect and observe subatomic particles without disrupting them if the gravitational wave was small enough? And then translate that ...
Jacob B's user avatar
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1 vote
1 answer
92 views

Simultaneous operations of LHC and LIGO

I once asked a question regarding atomic clocks near particle accelerators. Where the high-energy of the accelerators would be considered a source of stress energy. I was made to understand that the ...
Precious Adegbite's user avatar
3 votes
1 answer
41 views

Gravitational wave flux in Effective One-Body (EOB) models

I'm working for my M2 internship on gravitational waves in effective one-body approach, and I'm struggling in understanding how they compute the non-conservative flux from GW radiations. Most of the ...
Thomas Gabel's user avatar
1 vote
0 answers
32 views

Where can I obtain the recorded data of GWs and corresponding best-matched templates for published events confirmed by LIGO please?

It is known that the LIGO-Virgo Collaboration (LVC) has released over 100 confirmed GW events. For each event, I believe that they possess the recorded raw data, which is a one-dimensional sequence of ...
Wein's user avatar
  • 59
1 vote
1 answer
83 views

Geodesics on a gravitational wave

$$ \newcommand{\dot}[1]{\overset{.}{#1}} \newcommand{\ddot}[1]{\overset{..}{#1}} $$ Consider the following metric, which describes a linearized plane gravitational wave: $$ g_{\mu\nu} = \eta_{\mu\nu} +...
paulina's user avatar
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2 votes
1 answer
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How to relate a gravitational plane wave to the GW from a binary system?

I have two different forms of gravitational waves that I am trying to reconcile. A monochromatic GW with angular frequency $\Omega$ propagating in the $\textbf{n}$-direction can be expressed as $$ ...
user1887919's user avatar
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1 vote
1 answer
73 views

Gravitational waves from metric perturbation

I have just been introduced to gravitational waves from metric perturbations and I have some questions about gauge symmetry and solutions in a given gauge. Consider a metric on the form $g_{\mu\nu} = \...
ICOR's user avatar
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0 answers
56 views

Gravitational waves from any metric?

First, to be clear, I know practically nothing on gravitational waves and finding their solutions. The most I know confidently is that they are found by expanding the metric in a weak field expansion ...
MathZilla's user avatar
  • 704
11 votes
5 answers
1k views

How do gravitational waves carry energy when gravitational energy cannot be localised?

I have a very naive question, actually someone asked it and I can't answer. It simply asks that if gravitational energy cannot be localised (we cannot write a pure gravitational energy momentum tensor)...
damaihati's user avatar
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0 answers
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Destructive interference of Gravitational Waves and the Conservation of Energy

Destructive interferences are interesting for a physics student, specifically when checking the Energy Conservation. In the case of destructive EM waves or String waves it is easy to understand where ...
TheFyziker's user avatar
14 votes
3 answers
2k views

How do physicists mathematically define gravitational waves?

When one first encounters gravitational waves in a standard GR lecture or a standard textbook like Carroll's "Spacetime and Geometry", they are often "defined" as follows: The ...
Moguntius's user avatar
  • 357
1 vote
1 answer
156 views

Can a single black hole emit gravitational waves and evaporate?

I have read this: Yes, single neutron stars can emit gravitational waves if they have sufficient asymmetries. For some background, an object symmetric about its axis of rotation does not produce ...
Árpád Szendrei's user avatar
1 vote
0 answers
32 views

Help to approximately invert Post Newtonian expression [closed]

Can anyone advice how to perform some sort of Taylor series approximation to compute the inverse of the following expression for $t(v)$ i.e. to obtain $v(t)$. Thanks! $$ t(v) = t_0 - \frac{5M}{256\eta ...
cyberface's user avatar
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0 answers
59 views

4-graviton vertex of which one is an emitting graviton

For a four graviton vertex function, suppose $h_{\alpha\beta}h_{\gamma\delta}h_{\varepsilon\zeta}h_{00}$, of which $h_{00}$ is the emitting graviton to infinity. Now if we associate four-momenta $p_1$,...
NovoGrav's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
76 views

Orbital frequency of gravitational wave prior to merger [closed]

In the paper The basic physics of the binary black hole merger GW150914 Equation [A5] states that $$\dot \omega^3=\left(\frac{96}{5}\right)^3\frac{\omega^{11}}{c^{15}}\left(G\mathscr M\right)^5 \tag{...
Halcyon Mo's user avatar
1 vote
0 answers
31 views

Expression for the gravitational-wave energy-momentum tensor without choosing a gauge

While studying section 7.6 of Carroll's introduction to general relativity, I encountered difficulties deriving equation 7.165 for the gravitational-wave energy-momentum tensor. Unfortunately, I was ...
bruno henrique's user avatar
3 votes
0 answers
221 views

How Do Gravitons Follow Geodesics?

It is known that all particles follow a geodesic in spacetime. Presumably gravitons follow geodesics as well. However, how does one describe that mathematically? For the case of other particles it is ...
physics_2015's user avatar
4 votes
1 answer
193 views

Field equations for Maxwell and Einstein tensors in a weak field limit

I am following this paper here (arXiv here). What I want to do is derive equations ($2.7$) and ($2.8$) given in section $2$. While the authors include the higher order Euler Lagrangian terms in their ...
ShKol's user avatar
  • 322
0 votes
0 answers
85 views

Photons and gravitational wave

Both photons and gravitational disturbances travel at $c$. Given that a photon does cause a tiny stress in spacetime due to its energy, and the propagation of this stress is at the same velocity as ...
Rich's user avatar
  • 1,045
0 votes
1 answer
67 views

Can LISA observe BH beyond the observable universe?

Reading the paper "Astro2020 Science White Paper Where are the Intermediate Mass Black Holes?", and the plot in Fig.1, page 5, it seems LISA can see IMBH beyond 100 Gpc...Since the ...
riemannium's user avatar
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0 votes
1 answer
44 views

Observations of harmonics in gravitational wave experiments

In gravitational wave astronomy, we usually observe $f_{GW}=2f_K$ (gravitational wave frequency twice the orbital frequency from keplerian motion). However, we also know there should be harmonics with ...
riemannium's user avatar
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3 votes
1 answer
52 views

Gravitational waves and EOS in neutron stars

What is/are the gravitational wave observable/s that makes possible to measure the parameter/s of the equation of state of neutron stars?
riemannium's user avatar
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3 votes
2 answers
270 views

Merge of black holes with very different masses

Since surface area of the remnant black hole must be more that the sum of the binary surface then the maximum energy released via gravitational waves is $$ ΔE = [M_1 + M_2 – \sqrt{M_1^2 + M_2^2}]c^2 $$...
Vashu's user avatar
  • 629
2 votes
0 answers
65 views

Can I use gravitational wave to break electron's double slit interference?

Electrons will perturb spacetime. So in principle in a double slit experiment, I can detect the gravitational wave emitted by the electron by a super-super capable detector at very far away, and ...
user74750's user avatar
  • 195
2 votes
2 answers
98 views

Can Gravitational Waves Be Artificially Produced By An Electric Motor?

If gravitational waves are produced by two spinning black holes, is it possible to produce vacuum waves by mounting a giant dumbbell on a giant electric motor that can spin the dumbbell at a high ...
garmichaels's user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
35 views

Feedback control system in gravitational wave detectors

I am preparing for a seminar on ground-based gravitational wave detectors. One topic I have very little idea about is feedback control systems. I have a basic knowledge of it, but I need to read some ...
0 votes
1 answer
66 views

Can we use gravitational wave to detect which slit electron pass through?

Just in principle, in a double slit experiment, is it possible to use gravitational wave to determined which slit did an electron go through? I am honestly don't know, and it just a question that ...
Tensor's user avatar
  • 170
3 votes
1 answer
219 views

Detection of gravitational waves with rotating resonator

Attempts at detecting gravitational waves started with resonant-mass detectors. One gets some high Q mass and watches it's vibrations. When gravitational wave passes through the mass the latter gets ...
Vashu's user avatar
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15 votes
4 answers
5k views

Can gravitational waves do work?

I was reading about how a large amount of mass is lost as gravitational waves, X-ray radiation, and gamma radiation during a kilonova. I also read about the sticky bead analogy to better understand ...
user6760's user avatar
  • 13k
1 vote
0 answers
42 views

Thermal gravitational waves vs thermal radiation

A body at temperature $T$ has both an electromagnetic emission spectrum and a gravitational emission spectrum, are there any temperatures or conditions where the gravitational one could be comparable ...
Mauricio's user avatar
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0 votes
2 answers
85 views

Gravitational waves vs ULF Radio waves

During the recent merger of two Neutron stars the lead up to the merger was detected as gravitation waves. This was the merger of two spinning bodies that had very strong magnetic fields and they were ...
Michael Mcgarry's user avatar
2 votes
0 answers
47 views

Gravitational Wave Emission from Symmetrically Accelerating Systems

I've been exploring the concept of gravitational wave (G-wave) emission from symmetrically accelerating systems and have encountered a puzzling question. Standard sources typically state that ...
ElfredaCyania's user avatar
1 vote
2 answers
224 views

Does a linearly accelerating spherically symmetric body emit gravitational waves

According to Birkhoff's Theorem, any spherically symmetric body will not emit gravitational waves. I can understand this for an object that is contracting and expanding because from far away the ...
aP123's user avatar
  • 101
0 votes
1 answer
104 views

In terms of gravitational waves, what terms or components are actually embedded within $h_{\mu\nu}$?

In terms of gravitational waves: $$g_{\mu\nu}=\eta_{\mu\nu}+h_{\mu\nu}\text{ with } |h_{\mu\nu}|\ll 1$$ The components of $\eta_{\mu\nu}$ are $[-1,1,1,1]$ which expresses flat Minkowski spacetime. ...
Python House's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
33 views

$v_{GW}$ near a star

The Einstein field equations may be written as $R_{\mu \nu }-{\tfrac {1}{2}}R\,g_{\mu \nu }={8\pi G}T_{\mu \nu }$. At a very large distance from massive bodies one can neglect $T_{\mu \nu }$ and ...
9herbert9's user avatar
  • 113
1 vote
1 answer
119 views

Conceptually, what does the amplitude term in the wave equation represent when describing a gravitational wave?

I'm trying to conceptually understand what the amplitude term in the wave equation for a gravitational term represents, which is depicted as $A = A_0\cos(\omega t-kx)$ where $A_0$ is the amplitude ...
Python House's user avatar

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