Questions tagged [glass]

A glass is a type of amorphous solid whose structure is dominated by excluded-volume effects. Use this tag for questions about the glass transition and the thermodynamics and statistical mechanics of glasses.

Filter by
Sorted by
Tagged with
1 vote
0 answers
15 views

How can I identify a quarter or half wave plate from a used/modified Strainoptics polarimeter?

I'm a glassblower and I need to test glass formulas for compatibility. I'd like to use a polarimeter as it allows not only the detection of strain, but also informs if a glass needs to be softer or ...
Daniel Van Antwerp's user avatar
1 vote
3 answers
641 views

Does glass slowly (invisibly) degrade until it breaks?

(This question is about non-tempered glass.) I broke my favorite glass (tumbler) today, dropping it in my (ceramic) sink while trying to refill it. :( I'm kind of a klutz - that's far from the first ...
Keiji's user avatar
  • 121
0 votes
0 answers
21 views

How do I calculated the second Reflection (2) of light in glass (which equations and tools)

How do I calculated the second Reflection (2) of light in glass (which equations and tools)
Le future de Demain's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
55 views

How will light refract if it falls at the corner of a rectangular glass slab

my friend asked me a question related to the refraction of light at the corner of a glass slab. How will light behave in this situation? My thinking is that AB will be the surface and AC will act as ...
I-am-developer-9's user avatar
1 vote
0 answers
29 views

Detailed derivations about Mode Coupling Theory (MCT)

I am currently reading two articles related to mode coupling theory (MCT) and I am stuck in evaluating some ensemble averages, since there is no detailed derivations given. Moreover, the two ...
Jiho Son's user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
22 views

Very long timescale stress relief in glass

If someone scratches a glass, it is becoming weaker at this point, and more prone to cracking. But with time (tens and hundreds of years ) glass looses its shape because glass has amorphous structure. ...
Евгений Артеменко's user avatar
8 votes
1 answer
3k views

Does glass undergo internal damage in a similar way to wood?

Does glass undergo internal damage in a similar way to wood when struck hard, even if it doesn't visibly break, and is this damage accumulated gradually over time, or does it occur as a binary ...
Talespin_Kit's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
58 views

Explaining refraction of light through a glass slab

Let's consider a glass slab ABCD. Now a light ray is incident on the near end of the air-glass interface AB and is emerging from the glass-air interface BD. In such a manner: Is there something wrong ...
DEW DROPS's user avatar
2 votes
1 answer
306 views

What is the latent heat of melting for a everyday soda lime glass

This science direct article https://www.sciencedirect.com/topics/chemistry/soda-lime-glass States a particular type of glass (the most common one) and it's properties i was unable to find the latent ...
Doctor Pinocchio's user avatar
9 votes
1 answer
336 views

Mechanism causing red fluorescence from green (532nm) laser in household glass

Background / Experiment I was surprised by this toot by @gigabecquerel, where the author shows red fluorescence in the thick bottom of a (drink) glass when exposed to a cheap consumer-grade green ...
Marcus Müller's user avatar
2 votes
2 answers
61 views

Anisotropic Behavior of Glass in the Faraday Effect Experiment

I'm currently working on an experiment that uses the Faraday effect to determine the Verdet constant of SF-57 glass. Basically, similar to the photo above, I have a LED that generates a 405nm light. ...
Malu's user avatar
  • 23
0 votes
0 answers
31 views

Why does the pitch change as I tilt the glass

I noticed something recently where while I was drinking milk, when the glass was upright in my hand and I tapped the side, it produced one pitch, but while I was drinking it, and so the glass was ...
violetorigin's user avatar
2 votes
1 answer
54 views

Is amorphous ice thermodynamically stable?

Amorphous ice is often produced by cooling liquid water below its glass transition temperature so fast that it does not have time to form ice crystals. The fact that this can only occur if the ...
tparker's user avatar
  • 47.5k
3 votes
1 answer
51 views

Why does vitrification cause less damage to biological tissue than freezing does?

Long-duration cryopreservation of biological tissue (most often semen, egg cells, or fertilized embryos) is typically done at 77 K, since the samples can be easily kept at that temperature by ...
tparker's user avatar
  • 47.5k
0 votes
1 answer
38 views

Refraction of light as seen from a glass of water

When we put a straw in a glass of water the size and bending is more when viewd from side than from up. Is this due to the effect of the glass?
Raisa Hudson's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
37 views

A glass prism and a polaroid photo film

Let's say I am in a very dark room and a have a lamp with a cardboard tube around it. The cardboard tube has a tiny hole so light can leave. If a place a glass prism in the way of the beam, would I ...
Lukasz Skowron's user avatar
-1 votes
1 answer
85 views

Why do navy-blue blocks of glass (sometimes) brighten into cyan, or orange into yellow?

I'm learning how to illustrate transparent mediums realistically. Here are two examples illuminated with white light. I've noticed this doesn't occur with red or green, which stay their own colour. I ...
Robert B's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
303 views

Does using thinner glasses have any effect on how the eye look?

My daughter asked me to buy thin glasses for her eyes. So the power of the lenses are the same, but the glasses are thinner because the glasses use plastic with higher refraction index. Latter I found ...
user4951's user avatar
  • 591
1 vote
1 answer
230 views

Heaviside function in the form of an integral

I am currently reading Optimal storage properties of neural network models by E. Gardner. (DOI 10.1088/0305-4470/21/1/031) In appendix 1, the Heaviside function is expressed in integral form eq A1.1 $$...
TheStressTensor's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
104 views

Can High Wind Speed bent Steel Pipes? [closed]

Planning on using Steel Pipes as frames for holding laminated glass in a high wind area. Four sides will be covered by glass and the roofing will be also be covered with glass. Planning on using a ...
TurbulentSecret's user avatar
0 votes
2 answers
53 views

Is it possible to make multiple monitors (with glasses) in a way that each of the glasses would be able to see their specific monitor but not others?

So i was interested if i could make A B C monitors lets say and ive a b c glasses for all of them. My question was that is it physicly possible to make 3 same screens in a way that when i put on a ...
Beka  Machitidze's user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
287 views

Concave and Convex mirrors - How am i able to see the image without capturing on the screen but through my eyes?

When a Object’s light rays hits a Concave or Convex mirror, the image forms. How am i able to see this image? I Know we cant capture virtual images on screen and can capture real image and the light ...
Steve's user avatar
  • 15
1 vote
2 answers
325 views

Stokes relations for a glass slab

Stokes relations describes the transmission and reflection coefficients at a boundary between materials of different refractive indices, derived using a time-reversal argument. As far as I understand, ...
Yulong's user avatar
  • 13
0 votes
1 answer
116 views

Glass Slab to Prism! [closed]

Hi I want to know how the refraction of light takes place in different cases! Like Here is an image In this case the light refracte simply. While in the prism refraction of light becomes quite tricky....
Living Gamer's user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
46 views

UV light Skin depth for a Glass

From Wikipedia: $\delta = \sqrt{\dfrac{\rho}{\pi \cdot f \cdot \mu_r \cdot \mu_0}}$ $\rho$ for a glass was taken as $10^{11} \text{ } \Omega \cdot m $, $\mu_r$ for a glass was taken as $1$ (...
Victor Novak's user avatar
-4 votes
1 answer
86 views

Why aren't negative diopter glasses invisible?

If the diopters of a set of glasses determine the thickness, and higher diopters determine a thicker glass, why aren't negative diopter glass lens invisible?
user avatar
0 votes
2 answers
758 views

Translucent materials, like frosted glass, do have a refractive index?

I'm an architectural lighting designer in Mexico and I know the basics of absorption, transmission, reflection and refraction of materials. But I can't find anything about translucent materials like ...
Alejandro Ramírez's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
99 views

What is the speed of an air bubble in the glass?

This question arises from reading the sf poem Aniara, where the trip of the spaceship is compared to the movement of an air bubble encapsulated in a bulk of glass. How fast can such a bubble travel?
Xavier Prudent's user avatar
0 votes
2 answers
270 views

What is refractive index of a hollow glass container with a liquid inside?

Suppose that a thin hollow glass slab with a refractive index of $1.5$ contains a liquid inside, which has a refractive index of $\mu$, and $\mu \neq 1.5$. If I now send a laser light at the medium ...
Joe's user avatar
  • 67
2 votes
1 answer
210 views

When measuring IR for temperature of shiny surfaces, how is the object own emission added to the reflection?

While discussing measuring temperature of a heated glass plate used in 3D printers, it was pointed out that IR thermometers are not accurate because, for uncoated and shiny glass surface, they measure ...
FarO's user avatar
  • 157
3 votes
0 answers
35 views

Changing the apparent focal distance of an object

I'm not completely confident this is the write SE site to post this on, but it seems like the most relevant one. I want to make an object (with negligible thickness) that is around one to five ...
A. Owl's user avatar
  • 31
0 votes
0 answers
384 views

Why are the after effects of elasticity maximum for glass?

After effects of elasticity are maximum for A) Glass. B) Quartz C) Rubber. D) Metal The correct answer given is glass. The vague explanation provided is that in the case of metal, the metallic bonds' ...
user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
57 views

Why can you not look through glass? [duplicate]

I have this table but I cannot find out why I cannot look through the side of it.
Tobias Haldrup's user avatar
8 votes
2 answers
1k views

Why marbles don't shatter like a glass panel does?

Both are made of the same material, not talking about the tempered glass. But I don't see marbles shatter the way glass panel does, why is that? If I could scale up the marble to the size of a car and ...
user6760's user avatar
  • 13k
3 votes
2 answers
397 views

In general which laser would cut clear glass more easily, a visible spectrum laser or an infrared laser?

Assuming the two lasers have identical characteristics and power output except their wavelength, which one would be more successful and easy in cutting clear glass? In case there is doubt that you can ...
Markoul11's user avatar
  • 3,859
0 votes
0 answers
48 views

Phase velocity higher than the light speed for high frequencies in glass

The phase velocity is higher than the light speed for very high frequencies in glass, but nothing should transmit information faster than the light in the vacuum. So I read that a pure sinusoid wave ...
Redwaves's user avatar
9 votes
2 answers
419 views

How has Parisi's nobel-prize winning work been applied to all kinds of complex systems?

As discussed briefly in this APS Physics editorial, Nobel Prize: Complexity, from Atoms to Atmospheres, the most important works of the recent Nobel prize winning physicist concern the study of the ...
Wouter's user avatar
  • 1,542
4 votes
1 answer
116 views

Reproducing the disappearing glass experiment with normal glass

There is a famous disappearing glass experiment in which you use pyrex glass (IoR=1.47) and oils with similar IoR to create an illusion that the glass disappeared. Is there a liquid (mixture) that can ...
ygy's user avatar
  • 143
1 vote
1 answer
82 views

Glass Cracking Mystery!

Okay I had something very mysterious happen to me last night. Now I am not into believing ghosts or God exist. So I am looking for a scientific explanation for what happened!!! Last night, I was ...
hell_storm2004's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
160 views

Sound reduction window/glasses: What reduces sound?

Hello Physics community, I have a small question regarding noise reduction windows. May I ask what helps reduce sound wave please? Is it the thickness of the glass? I see some windows with different ...
PatPanda's user avatar
  • 103
0 votes
1 answer
949 views

Change of position of object with and without glasses/spectacles

If I look at an object with my glasses on and then remove my glasses, the object and everything in my field of vision seem to undergo a displacement. From my judgment, the displacement is greater for ...
jamie1989's user avatar
  • 1,816
1 vote
0 answers
40 views

Are window glasses transparent or opaque to infrared radiation? [duplicate]

I have been trying to understand this concept to identify on the best option to reduce temperature in my room. I have read few article which stated that glass is transparent to IR radiation. ie Beyond ...
Darshan L's user avatar
  • 111
0 votes
0 answers
72 views

Why does a thin film of gold turn from pink/purple to green in reflected light when encased by glass?

I am a glass artist working in the medium now for 25 years. I cannot figure this out. When I fume gold onto borosilicate glass, it appears pink/purple when not encased. If I encase the gold, it takes ...
John koutsouros's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
53 views

Working of a lightboard or glass board?

While watching an YouTube tutorial in which the tutor was teaching on some sort of glass board from the behind of this board or which is called as "Lightboard" also, I wondered to know how ...
Ganit's user avatar
  • 111
3 votes
1 answer
228 views

Is there a limit to how much light can pass through glass?

Let’s say I have a one cubic centimeter of glass. Without going into the details, we know that light passes through this glass with the help of the glass. The glass facilitates light’s transmission ...
Lambda's user avatar
  • 4,721
2 votes
1 answer
129 views

Why does glass break into pieces rather than just melting or cracking

In the given link of a video. The maker puts hot lava on different kind of types of glass . https://youtu.be/wLNBLUm3CZQ my question is why does glass break into innumerable pieces rather than just ...
imposter's user avatar
  • 1,200
0 votes
0 answers
41 views

Does there exist a material through which light can only pass alog one axis?

What I mean is that if I put a block of this "magic glass" onto the tip a flashlight I would not see any light unless I look through the glass at just the right angle. For example, it seems ...
Robert Wegner's user avatar
1 vote
0 answers
845 views

What is the ideal gap between two panes of glass for insulation? [closed]

I have two panes of glass, about a 3/8" thick (.95 cm). Space efficiency and aesthetics ignored, how far apart should they be spaced to maximize heat insulation, assuming the gap contains regular ...
gunfulker's user avatar
  • 139
1 vote
2 answers
467 views

What, really, makes glass transparent? [duplicate]

I don't mean to be cheeky with the question, but it reflects the myriad of often seemingly conflicting answers I've seen around this. And that's not surprising of course given the dual nature of light ...
Noman's user avatar
  • 13
0 votes
0 answers
15 views

Consequences of fusing metallic glasses

I have come across some information about metallic glasses which has brought up questions. I have read that due to the need for high cooling rates generally, quantities of metallic glass are only ...
Σ baryon's user avatar
  • 161