Questions tagged [glass]

A glass is a type of amorphous solid whose structure is dominated by excluded-volume effects. Use this tag for questions about the glass transition and the thermodynamics and statistical mechanics of glasses.

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Terminal velocity & Glass [closed]

Bit of a strange question, but here goes. Would a human being travelling at terminal velocity die (or likely die) by passing through a 6.5mm thick glass pane? In other words, would this person hit a ...
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Temperature of spin-glass transition

In the literature on spin glasses I see a lot of theoretical phase diagrams and experimental plots with a definite spin-glass transition temperature $T_\mathrm{G}$. For example, in this figure from J....
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Why did my recently cleaned glass break?

Yesterday, I washed a glass with hot water and left it to dry in the following position: After a several minutes I heard a weird sound. I came back to the kitchen and found that the glass broken, ...
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Which factors determine whether a substance will be amorphous or crystalline on solidification?

What decides whether a substance will be crystalline or amorphous when it solidifies? I heard various folklores that the method of condensation of a liquid (fast or slow cooling) can be a factor ...
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Why does pepper not stick to the glass with print inside my pepper shaker?

So I have this pepper shaker made of glass with a print on it: One fine dinner, it ran out of pepper, so I opened the lid to fill it up and noticed a peculiar thing – small particles of pepper dust ...
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Bifurcations in Statistical Physics

I am currently a grad level student in physics with much interest in statistical and soft-matter physics (equilibrium and out of equilibrium); I am currently taking a course in numerical methods for ...
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Definition of glass transition

I am getting confused about the definition of a "glass transition". I read for example that it can be a transition from a rubber state to a brittle state in polymers. In this case therefore I would ...
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Resonating glasses

When we collide two glasses they produce sound like not from one collision but from multiple. And frequency changes over time. Is this because they resonate with each other? But how this resonase ...
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Why is it harder to see rain through a glass window?

Every time it rains mildly, I can hardly, if at all, see it through a glass window. If I open the window, I see just fine - and it can be raining hard enough to require an umbrella for a short walk. ...
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80 views

Would a cold glass, put on a wet surface, break more easily when you pour hot water in it?

If we have a room temperature glass bowl placed on a wet counter would the glass break more easily when hot water is poured in it, than if the counter had not been wet?
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Classical (non-quantum) explanation for the transparency of glass?

Is there a classical explanation for the transparency of glass? How did physicists explain the transparency of glass before quantum mechanics?
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Entropy Increase when forming Metallic Glass

I'm in an undergrad soft matter physics class, and this question is tricky to all of us including our professor. Let's say we have some metal in a liquid state at some high temperature. Then we ...
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How does light pass through any glass? [duplicate]

This might be a very stupid question for Science students, but I had this doubt always, since childhood. I still don't understand even when I'm adult because I didn't read science in detail. When I ...
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Why does glass break at a given momentum?

My question is:Why is it more accurate to suppose that a sheet of glass will break, after being hit by a projectile with a given momentum, than suppose that it will break after receiving an impact ...
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Determining the refractive index of a glass slab using a travelling microscope

In this practical video of finding the refractive index, the reading is being taken by placing the travelling microscope perpendicular to the slab. But I've learned in another video(Frame Shot) if you ...
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If a photon is powerful enough, will it not pass through glass?

So I know how glass works, it has a large electron gap so the photons that hit it don't have enough energy to move the electrons into a high energy state and instead pass through because the amount of ...
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What opposes a smooth motion of a rubber eraser on a glass surface?

A metal block smoothly moves on a glass surface. But a rubber eraser doesn't move very smoothly on a glass surface. In each of the cases, the surfaces are smooth at the macroscopic scale. If the ...
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313 views

Why does a laser beam stay coherent when it passes through glass?

If I have a coherent laser beam and I shine it through some glass, the light will slow down because it will interact weakly with the atoms in the glass. However, the beam that comes out the other side ...
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143 views

Why is glass really transparent? [duplicate]

Glass is an amorphous polymorph of silicon dioxide, melted and quenched so that grain boundaries grow uniformly and are small with respect to visible light. Its an oxide not a metal and has a large ...
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Theory or method on how to calculate the pressure needed to push a viscous fluid through a narrow slit

I need to calculate the minimum amount of pressure I need to apply to a piece of molten glass to start making it pass through a narrow slit - think 1 kg of glass and a 0.2 mm slit. At this point I ...
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Can a light block/reduce another light if projected in exact opposite direction?

For my project, I want to block a light passing through clear window glass temporarily, without manual work and without a curtain etc, want to be able to see through the glass, unobstructed if ...
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Why is frosted glass reflective at an angle? [duplicate]

I have a Pixel 3, and the back of the phone is frosted glass. I noticed today that if I look at the back from a wide angle it becomes reflective, whereas it is opaque when looking directly on. What ...
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Why doesn't water actually perfectly wet glass?

According to many high school textbook sources, water perfectly wets glass. That is, the adhesion between water and glass is so strong that it is energetically favorable for a drop of water on glass ...
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3answers
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What is the purpose of glass in mirror as it only reflect very little light?

In a typical mirror there is a thick layer of glass followed by a thin layer of silver coated on one side of the mirror which reflects most of the light, what purpose do the glass have?
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Why can't ultraviolet light pass through glass?

What factor determine whether a body behaves like a transparent object for EM waves of a particular frequency?
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Why glass is considered as an opaque body…? [closed]

We know that the transmissivity of glass is 0 then also in general conditions it is taken as an opaque body and also in some books, it is taken as an opaque body.
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Can amorphous solids have energy bands?

One can understand the formation of energy bands from the Kronig-Penny model which assumes a periodic potential. But I heard that even if the potential is aperiodic, for example in amorphous ...
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Star Trek - Transparent Metals Possible?

Is the concept of transparent metals (like the transparent aluminum in Star Trek IV - Voyage Home) a real-life concept? Or is it far-fetched movie fiction? Thus my main question then is: could we ...
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Can a glass screen protector reduce the impact on a phone?

Glass screen protectors supposedly protect your phone from impact. A youtube comment by McZidanne sums up this idea pretty clearly: The thing about tempered glass cover isn't the protection they ...
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Cooling liquid inside a pint glass with an aluminium plate

Basically the title. If I have a very cold aluminium plate (don't know the temperature, but enough to have frost) and put a glass pint glass on top of it with liquid inside of it will that cold ...
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43 views

Best glass to reflect visible light (mainly Green)

i have a laser source which emits green light underwater (kept collimator under water) and planning to reflect the green laser back to free space(project is to establish air water interface). I want ...
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Why is fused silica superior to N-BK7 in terms of thermal lensing?

In optics lab, the two commonly used types of glasses are N-BK7 and fused silica. The lab wisdom has been that fused silica is superior to N-BK7 in terms of thermal lensing. And indeed it seems so. ...
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Weird Reflection Pattern in Reading Glasses

While fidgeting with a pair of reading glasses, I noticed a strange reflection pattern (shown in video and photo). I would appreciate it if anyone that knows more about this could help me figure out ...
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Can a piece of glass get higher than the height the original cup of glass fell from?

If yes, what physics concepts make this possible? This isn't for any class or anything, is just a honest doubt of mine.
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Why was the glass broken in the Lobby but not above the impact zone? - 9/11

Disclaimer: I do thoroughly believe that 9/11 was a terrorist attack, so please don't start arguing whether it was an attack or inside job, focus on the question. Also: I was about to post this in ...
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A metallic container when hammered deforms but a wine glass when falls or hammered breaks. Why?

A wine glass breaks when it falls from hand or is hammered. But when a metallic object (say, a container) is hammered, it only deforms without breaking. Why? Is it somehow related to the fact that ...
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333 views

How does one do 3D subsurface laser engraving for relatively translucent minerals?

3D Subsurface Laser Engraving works for clear glasses like Schott BK7 and B9 Borosilicate Glass. How does one do the same for relatively translucent minerals? I have read research papers on using ...
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Refraction: Swimming goggles, short-sightedness, and underwater vision

I have thought of this question due to personal experience. I am short-sighted, and over the last three years my short-sightedness has worsened. Taking a lifeguard certificate again now that I did ...
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Why do we disorder-average before/after taking the logarithm of the partition function for annealed/quenched disorder?

Pg. 19 of these notes says Crucially, the [disorder] average $\overline{\log Z}$ has to be computed after taking the logarithm. Such an average is called quenched ... Computing the average first, ...
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Why would/do you wet glass after scoring it to break it?

In this youtube video about a water cooled desktop PC build log the author uses glass tubing to route the water around the system. Around 4:08, when the first tube break/cut is shown, the author pours ...
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Why does molten sand cool to form glass and not return to it's original yellow form?

I came across this website on the internet: http://www.explainthatstuff.com/glass.html. In this website, it is said that When molten sand cools, it doesn't turn back into the gritty yellow stuff ...
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Why iron sparks damage the glass surface but do not harm leather apron?

Sparks from electrical welding or from electrical grinding damage surfaces of glass or tiles while they do not damage the leather apron and even plastics. For example protecting glass in the old ...
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Why does my beveled mirror make triplicate “ghosts”?

Here is a picture of my power adapter. You can see in has one green LED lit when charging. Now here is a picture of my mirror with beveled edges. When I view the power adapter in the mirror, I see ...
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Will lime soda/borosilicate glass tubes glued/sealed with indium leak or crack?

I want to evacuate steam from a vacuum chamber with a dry ice or LN2 cold finger. I'm planning to connect the vacuum chamber and the cold finger via a tube. This inner tube will be glued/sealed with ...
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What are eclipse glasses made of? [closed]

What is the principle of eclipse glasses? Are they just high optical density plastic, or do they do something fancier? Could I make my own by taping ND filters into cardboard? I tried Googling ...
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What is glass: amorphous solid or supercooled liquid?

I have read glass is amorphous solid and also supercooled liquid. I know that all solids are frozen liquids. But is it fair to say that everything which is an amorphous solid is also a supercooled ...
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791 views

Is it possible to create glass that is impassible to infrared radiation?

I read an article today about how UPS has covered some of their trucks with frosted glass to allow drivers to see and find their packages with greater ease. However, one of the drivers noted the ...
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Why do ring stains form when leaving glasses on wood? [closed]

From wikipedia: Coasters protect the surface of a table or any other surface where the user might place a beverage. Without coasters, you will often get a ring stain on your table like this: What ...
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How and why would a glass table break in this manner?

Recently, a relative of mine came to me asking me to explain a strange physics phenomenon. She had 3 glass tables; 2 small and one large arranged neatly such that the small tables were half enclosed ...
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Why glass always breaks into sharp pieces?

I understand that common glass and pottery (though not, for example, the glass of a car's windscreen) breaks very easily because it is very brittle and it has a great number of "cracks" in its ...