Questions tagged [glass]

A glass is a type of amorphous solid whose structure is dominated by excluded-volume effects. Use this tag for questions about the glass transition and the thermodynamics and statistical mechanics of glasses.

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Consequences of fusing metallic glasses

I have come across some information about metallic glasses which has brought up questions. I have read that due to the need for high cooling rates generally, quantities of metallic glass are only ...
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Why are the edges of a broken glass almost opaque?

Unfortunately I broke my specs today which I used in this question. But I observed that the edges are completely different then the entire part of the lens. The middle portion of the lens was ...
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Kirchhoff's law for glass and transparent crystals; how exactly do hot transparent materials produce so much visible thermal radiation?

Together, the current answers to Is the visible light spectrum from "red-hot glass" at least close to Blackbody Radiation? explain that while we can not necessarily call a heated sample of ...
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112 views

What is the physics behind the screen protectors? [closed]

Screen protectors are supposed to protect your device from nicks and scratches, and the stress of impacts which might otherwise lead to cracks. The basic idea being that screen-protector glass "...
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Reflection on glass, angle of incidence and ghost image

I am using a very thin piece of glass, 0.2mm in thickness (screen protector), located in front of my eye to reflect an image at about 45degrees. The image is located about 1m below the glass. The ...
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1answer
34 views

Glass state of water

There is a lot of works on hard-sphere glasses where the spheres or other particles are squeezed and fail to find the global energy minimum being jammed in amorphous state. Is it possible to form a ...
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Magnifying glass geometrical shapes variants

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Magnifying_glass As we see the magnifying glass is a circle. Can we design & construct magnifying glass with other shapes viz triangle, rectangle, hexagon, Kite ? ...
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Are there photosensitive/light-sensitive glasses that use visible light to expose an image?

For instance, im wondering if there were a glass I could expose an image using an enlarger, and fix the glass without using heat. I doubt it, just curious to know if UV exposed, heat-cured ...
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IR and UV transmissivity window of the (human) eye

Given this image: I just assume that the eye is made out of glass, so I wonder how is it that IR and UV radiation is absorbed by it? I would understand one of them but why is it transmissible for ...
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How to protect glass from direct, excessive hot air?

I need to use a hot air gun directly next to a one-way mirror glass window which is embedded in a wooden frame. I've read that a heat gun can shatter the glass easily because the excessive direct heat,...
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Would Cherenkov radiation be observed in Uranium glass?

I recently read about Cherenkov Radiation and the neat blue glow it creates in underwater nuclear reactors, and my understanding of it is that it occurs due to particles ($\beta$ particles in the case ...
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Why does hot (molten) glass glow, while diamond does not?

I have read this question: Why doesn't diamond glow when hot? This is because of Kirchhoff's law of thermal radiation. The corollary from it is that emissivity of a material is equal to its ...
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Is there a relation between the domains in broken (but not shattered) tempered glas and the amorphous structure of glass?

When a thick plate of glass is hit (strong enough) by an object (say a shoe, by which I don't like to encourage vandalism, but I think that's happened when I saw the glass plate at a train station). ...
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Why does glass, in spite of being amorphous, often break along very smooth surfaces?

When a crystalline material breaks, it often does so along planes in its crystalline structure. As such this is a result of its microscopic structure. When glass breaks however, the shapes along which ...
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Why does the pitch of an ice cube hitting against the side of a glass increase as the glass empties? [duplicate]

When dropping several ice cubes into a full glass of water, I've noticed that the pitch of the cubes hitting against the side of the glass is much lower than if the glass contains less water - the ...
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Can I build a cuvette for 400-700 nm using simple microscope slides?

I want to measure the absorbance spectrum of some solutions, in the 400-700 nm range. I've always used regular "optical glass" cuvettes for this. But I've been wondering, is this really ...
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How does the resonant frequency of a glass slab depend on its thickness

I am interested in finding out how does the thickness of a glass slab change the resonant frequency of it. Since i know that resonant frequency not only depends on the material but also on the ...
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Copper or Glass for Low Latency?

I'd like to preface the main content of this post with the following: I understand this question may be equally suited to the Network Engineering Stack Exchange, but I believe the answer relies on a ...
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Temperature of spin-glass transition

In the literature on spin glasses I see a lot of theoretical phase diagrams and experimental plots with a definite spin-glass transition temperature $T_\mathrm{G}$. For example, in this figure from J....
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Why did my recently cleaned glass break?

Yesterday, I washed a glass with hot water and left it to dry in the following position: After a several minutes I heard a weird sound. I came back to the kitchen and found that the glass broken, ...
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Which factors determine whether a substance will be amorphous or crystalline on solidification?

What decides whether a substance will be crystalline or amorphous when it solidifies? I heard various folklores that the method of condensation of a liquid (fast or slow cooling) can be a factor ...
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Why does pepper not stick to the glass with print inside my pepper shaker?

So I have this pepper shaker made of glass with a print on it: One fine dinner, it ran out of pepper, so I opened the lid to fill it up and noticed a peculiar thing – small particles of pepper dust ...
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Bifurcations in Statistical Physics

I am currently a grad level student in physics with much interest in statistical and soft-matter physics (equilibrium and out of equilibrium); I am currently taking a course in numerical methods for ...
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Definition of glass transition

I am getting confused about the definition of a "glass transition". I read for example that it can be a transition from a rubber state to a brittle state in polymers. In this case therefore I would ...
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Resonating glasses

When we collide two glasses they produce sound like not from one collision but from multiple. And frequency changes over time. Is this because they resonate with each other? But how this resonase ...
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Why is it harder to see rain through a glass window?

Every time it rains mildly, I can hardly, if at all, see it through a glass window. If I open the window, I see just fine - and it can be raining hard enough to require an umbrella for a short walk. ...
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Would a cold glass, put on a wet surface, break more easily when you pour hot water in it?

If we have a room temperature glass bowl placed on a wet counter would the glass break more easily when hot water is poured in it, than if the counter had not been wet?
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Classical (non-quantum) explanation for the transparency of glass?

Is there a classical explanation for the transparency of glass? How did physicists explain the transparency of glass before quantum mechanics?
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How does light pass through any glass? [duplicate]

This might be a very stupid question for Science students, but I had this doubt always, since childhood. I still don't understand even when I'm adult because I didn't read science in detail. When I ...
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Why does glass break at a given momentum?

My question is:Why is it more accurate to suppose that a sheet of glass will break, after being hit by a projectile with a given momentum, than suppose that it will break after receiving an impact ...
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795 views

Determining the refractive index of a glass slab using a travelling microscope

In this practical video of finding the refractive index, the reading is being taken by placing the travelling microscope perpendicular to the slab. But I've learned in another video(Frame Shot) if you ...
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If a photon is powerful enough, will it not pass through glass?

So I know how glass works, it has a large electron gap so the photons that hit it don't have enough energy to move the electrons into a high energy state and instead pass through because the amount of ...
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What opposes a smooth motion of a rubber eraser on a glass surface?

A metal block smoothly moves on a glass surface. But a rubber eraser doesn't move very smoothly on a glass surface. In each of the cases, the surfaces are smooth at the macroscopic scale. If the ...
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Why does a laser beam stay coherent when it passes through glass?

If I have a coherent laser beam and I shine it through some glass, the light will slow down because it will interact weakly with the atoms in the glass. However, the beam that comes out the other side ...
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Why is glass really transparent? [duplicate]

Glass is an amorphous polymorph of silicon dioxide, melted and quenched so that grain boundaries grow uniformly and are small with respect to visible light. Its an oxide not a metal and has a large ...
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Theory or method on how to calculate the pressure needed to push a viscous fluid through a narrow slit

I need to calculate the minimum amount of pressure I need to apply to a piece of molten glass to start making it pass through a narrow slit - think 1 kg of glass and a 0.2 mm slit. At this point I ...
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Can a light block/reduce another light if projected in exact opposite direction?

For my project, I want to block a light passing through clear window glass temporarily, without manual work and without a curtain etc, want to be able to see through the glass, unobstructed if ...
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Why is frosted glass reflective at an angle? [duplicate]

I have a Pixel 3, and the back of the phone is frosted glass. I noticed today that if I look at the back from a wide angle it becomes reflective, whereas it is opaque when looking directly on. What ...
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Why doesn't water actually perfectly wet glass?

According to many high school textbook sources, water perfectly wets glass. That is, the adhesion between water and glass is so strong that it is energetically favorable for a drop of water on glass ...
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What is the purpose of glass in mirror as it only reflect very little light?

In a typical mirror there is a thick layer of glass followed by a thin layer of silver coated on one side of the mirror which reflects most of the light, what purpose do the glass have?
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Why can't ultraviolet light pass through glass?

What factor determine whether a body behaves like a transparent object for EM waves of a particular frequency?
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Why glass is considered as an opaque body…? [closed]

We know that the transmissivity of glass is 0 then also in general conditions it is taken as an opaque body and also in some books, it is taken as an opaque body.
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Can amorphous solids have energy bands?

One can understand the formation of energy bands from the Kronig-Penny model which assumes a periodic potential. But I heard that even if the potential is aperiodic, for example in amorphous ...
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Star Trek - Transparent Metals Possible?

Is the concept of transparent metals (like the transparent aluminum in Star Trek IV - Voyage Home) a real-life concept? Or is it far-fetched movie fiction? Thus my main question then is: could we ...
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Can a glass screen protector reduce the impact on a phone?

Glass screen protectors supposedly protect your phone from impact. A youtube comment by McZidanne sums up this idea pretty clearly: The thing about tempered glass cover isn't the protection they ...
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Cooling liquid inside a pint glass with an aluminium plate

Basically the title. If I have a very cold aluminium plate (don't know the temperature, but enough to have frost) and put a glass pint glass on top of it with liquid inside of it will that cold ...
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Best glass to reflect visible light (mainly Green)

i have a laser source which emits green light underwater (kept collimator under water) and planning to reflect the green laser back to free space(project is to establish air water interface). I want ...
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Why is fused silica superior to N-BK7 in terms of thermal lensing?

In optics lab, the two commonly used types of glasses are N-BK7 and fused silica. The lab wisdom has been that fused silica is superior to N-BK7 in terms of thermal lensing. And indeed it seems so. ...
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Weird Reflection Pattern in Reading Glasses

While fidgeting with a pair of reading glasses, I noticed a strange reflection pattern (shown in video and photo). I would appreciate it if anyone that knows more about this could help me figure out ...
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Can a piece of glass get higher than the height the original cup of glass fell from?

If yes, what physics concepts make this possible? This isn't for any class or anything, is just a honest doubt of mine.