Questions tagged [frequency]

Frequency is the rate of repetitive aspect in the amplitude over a given dimension.

Filter by
Sorted by
Tagged with
15 votes
6 answers
7k views

Why color depends on frequency and not on wavelength? [duplicate]

To explain my question lets consider this example: The wavelength of light in a medium is $\lambda=\lambda_{0}/\mu$, where $\lambda_{0}$ is the wavelength in vacuum. A beam of red light ($\lambda_{0}=...
Devansh Mittal's user avatar
3 votes
0 answers
82 views

Why do water surfaces have persistent "average wavelength" patches?

Have you ever stood above a river or lake and noticed that the surface has visible "patches"? It looks like the surface has different average wavelengths in some areas, leading to the light ...
Robert Wegner's user avatar
2 votes
1 answer
66 views

How can the Rabi frequency be complex?

I've been doing some reading and came across a simple implementation of the Hadamard gate using Rabi oscillations of an atom in a laser field. However, the author mentions that it required the Rabi ...
rb101's user avatar
  • 35
0 votes
0 answers
28 views

What duration of a white noise burst is required for it to be "white" at a given frequency or frequency range?

I am running white noise bursts (with very short ramps on/off to prevent discontinuities) through underdamped resonant bandpasses which are tuned to any given $f_0$ and an underdamped $Q$. Continuous ...
mike's user avatar
  • 321
-2 votes
0 answers
50 views

Is the Planck's constant the minimum amount of energy that can be transported by a photon? How? - Trying to make sense of Planck'a constant

So, the Planck's constant ($h$) is $6,62607015\times 10^{-34}$. And you express this in Joules/Hertz or Joule-seconds. $$h=\frac{E}{\nu}$$ Let's say $E=6,62607015\times 10^{-34}\text{ Joules}$ and $\...
Manuel's user avatar
  • 1
1 vote
1 answer
58 views

Is natural frequency a local or global property?

Some objects have a natural frequency. This can be anything from a metal ball to a table, etc. When we hit such an object, it will start vibrating with a certain frequency $f$. Because of damping the ...
Riemann's user avatar
  • 1,407
-1 votes
1 answer
111 views

Should natural frequency be modeled using molecules?

Consider an object. This can be anything from a metal ball to a table, etc. Now this object has a natural frequency. When we hit the object, it will start vibrating with a certain frequency $f$. ...
Riemann's user avatar
  • 1,407
0 votes
1 answer
60 views

Orbital frequency of gravitational wave prior to merger [closed]

In the paper The basic physics of the binary black hole merger GW150914 Equation [A5] states that $$\dot \omega^3=\left(\frac{96}{5}\right)^3\frac{\omega^{11}}{c^{15}}\left(G\mathscr M\right)^5 \tag{...
Halcyon Mo's user avatar
2 votes
0 answers
34 views

Frequence vs speed of a moving object

Imagine swinging wood stick using hand (say it's a 1-meter long cylinder with 2 centimeter diameter, just for the sake of argument). When doing it fast (angular velocity = $\omega_1$), it will create ...
h218614's user avatar
  • 21
1 vote
3 answers
114 views

Damped Quantum Harmonic Oscillator with sinusoidal driving force

The standard Damped one-dimensional Harmonic Oscillator with sinusoidal driving force has equation $$\frac{d^2}{dt^2}x(t)+2\zeta\omega_0\frac{d}{dt}x(t)+\omega_0^2x(t)=\frac{1}{m}F_0\sin(\omega t).$$ ...
Riemann's user avatar
  • 1,407
0 votes
1 answer
44 views

Measuring the tension of a drumhead

I'm working on an experiment to see how the tension of a drumhead impacts the frequency of its sound, but I'm not sure as to how I could measure this. I found this forum thread from 2012, which ...
lopmon's user avatar
  • 1
1 vote
1 answer
37 views

How to standardize the energy of a Dirac delta function relative to sample rate (width) and amplitude?

Background I was instructed that a Dirac delta function (impulse from $0$ to $A$ then back to $0$ at short duration) has a white noise audio frequency type excitation distribution here ie. It should ...
mike's user avatar
  • 321
1 vote
2 answers
42 views

Is it possible to, like white noise, excite all audio frequencies equally, but with a more immediate & less random burst? Like a signal discontinuity?

I am trying to generate an audio signal that, like white noise, has "equal intensity at different frequencies, giving it a constant power spectral density", but unlike white noise, can be ...
mike's user avatar
  • 321
0 votes
1 answer
63 views

What is the spectrum of a broken square drum?

Given a square drum with sides length equal to $L$, the squared raised frequencies are $(\pi m/L)^2 + (\pi n/L)^2 $ with $m,n \in \mathbb{N}^*$. Here we have four boundary conditions (no vibration on ...
Naima's user avatar
  • 678
1 vote
0 answers
33 views

Why doesn't frequency change when the medium of the wave changes, and only depend on the source of the wave? [duplicate]

When the medium of the wave changes, the velocity and the wavelength does change, but not frequency, why?
Chethas Pai's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
59 views

Do humans hear the beat frequency or the average frequency or just individual frequencies?

We have two sound sources of the same amplitude but of slightly different frequencies : $f_1$ and $f_2$. When they are sounded simultaneously what would be the frequency that an observer hears ? I ...
wonderingwhy's user avatar
0 votes
3 answers
130 views

Why does the equation of a wave contain the term $\omega t$ instead of $vt$ in the wave equation $y=A\sin (kx-\omega t)$?

Why does the equation of a wave contain the term $\omega t$ instead of $vt$ in the wave equation $$y=A\sin (kx-\omega t).$$ I think of the constant $k$ which for higher values increases the frequency $...
Jeffy James's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
46 views

String vibration dimensions

We're all familiar with the typical diagrams of standing waves of a string, as in this image from Wikipedia: The thing that bothers me is that they ignore the reality that the string is vibrating in ...
Eric Singer's user avatar
1 vote
4 answers
148 views

$0$th overtone in closed organ pipes

I know about $1$st, $2$nd or other overtones in the formula of frequency in a one-sided open system (specifically in closed organ pipes) that is $$ f = \frac{\left( 2 n + 1 \right) v}{4 L} \tag{1} \...
phymestri's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
73 views

Let's say I have manufactured a prism from a non-dispersive medium, then light coming from air wouldn't split into colours right?

Let's say I have manufactured a prism from a non-dispersive medium, then light coming from air incident on the prism wouldn't split into colours, right? I mean light still changes direction, but all ...
Jack's user avatar
  • 803
0 votes
1 answer
43 views

Generally speaking, the speed of a wave depends on the medium and the wave type, so waves of the same type in the same medium attain the same speed [duplicate]

My question is, given the above statement, why electromagnetic waves attain different speeds in media other than vacuum even though they are of the same type and propagate in the same medium?
Jack's user avatar
  • 803
0 votes
0 answers
22 views

A ball dropped onto a rotating wheel of various frequencies experiment issues

I'm doing a experiment to find the relationship between the frequency of the rotating wheel and the horizontal distance travelled by the ball dropped onto it. I am manipulating the frequency of the ...
dark sorceror's user avatar
2 votes
0 answers
44 views

How do lower frequencies change differently than higher ones as they travel?

I read the following on the internet: "This means that as sound travels, its relative frequency content alters making the low frequencies more prominent at greater distances, creating low ...
blue_ego's user avatar
  • 131
0 votes
1 answer
31 views

Number of times the displacement of an object executing a simple harmonic motion becomes zero

I was solving some SHM problems when i came across this particular question. It asked, what is the frequency of SHM of an object whose displacement becomes zero 200 times in one second. The answer is ...
Baksish's user avatar
  • 11
0 votes
1 answer
20 views

How can one explain the small amplitude resonance before the onset of main resonance condition?

I was using a sonometer to verify the frequency of a.c. supply in the lab is 50 Hz. For this the equation I used is f=(1/4L) x Sq. root (T/m) I set tension T = 4.9 N by hanging 0.5kg mass mass per ...
Shinnaaan's user avatar
  • 1,219
-1 votes
1 answer
98 views

The physics behind the circle / spiral of fifths

In music theory, there is this thing called the circle of fifths. If you take a string, and you divide it in two equal parts, you get a so called octave. It is, to our ear, kind of "the same tone&...
Willem van Houten's user avatar
19 votes
6 answers
3k views

Can human ear hear 4 Hz frequency, if I tap my hand 4 times per second on table?

Frequency means the number of repetitions per second. Humans can hear between 20 Hz and 20 kHz, but I have a very basic question: if I tap my hand four times on a table per second, it means I am ...
Avinash Agrawal's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
70 views

Change in Frequency while Tearing Paper

Let us assume you have a 30cm strip of paper, and you tear it lengthwise. Let us abbreviate the frequency produced when you reach the end of the paper as $f_2$ and the frequency of sound heard when ...
Schrödinger's Cat's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
73 views

Is sound essentially motion?

From my understanding, the only way for humans to create sound is by moving our bodies, vocal cords, or by moving other objects. So depending on how fast we or other objects can move, different ...
Lecifer's user avatar
  • 109
0 votes
1 answer
65 views

Why doesn't the frequency of a cyclotron make an impact on the radius of the path of a charged particle?

The cyclotron frequency is given by $$f=\frac{qB}{2πm}$$ Obviously this equation has nothing to do with the radius. But my question is, when the frequency increases, shouldn't the velocity increase, ...
wonderingwhy's user avatar
1 vote
0 answers
75 views

How can I find if it is gold or lead with waves? [closed]

I would find if a bowl is made of lead or gold know freqencies $w_{1}$ and $w_{2}$ and a vibrator induces waves at $z=0$ (and there are reflected waves). I do it with progressive plane electromagnetic ...
Dlouna.J's user avatar
3 votes
2 answers
131 views

Does dimensional consistency imply the same units?

Can two units having the same dimensions always be used interchangeably? For example $s^{-1}$ and $\frac{rad}{s}$ have the same physical dimension, does that mean we can measure frequency $\nu$ with ...
Jack's user avatar
  • 803
0 votes
0 answers
29 views

Translating plasma units into SI units

I am trying to compute the characteristic lengths and frequencies in a plasma, namely the electron plasma frequency and electron inertial length. From the NRL plasma formulary $$\omega_{pe}\ [rad/s] = ...
Zelkin's user avatar
  • 1
0 votes
0 answers
80 views

The frequency is off by a factor of $2 \pi$?

I was reading Morin's Introduction to Mechanics, and the following material came up: At equilibrium point $x_0$ expanding the Taylor series, we see $V(x)=\frac12 V''(x_0)(x-x_0)^2$ so comparing this ...
Aditya_math's user avatar
0 votes
2 answers
113 views

What is the angular frequency $\omega$ in which the maximum current occur?

for a circuit which consist of an AC supply, an inductor, a resistor and a capacitor, the differential equation would be $IR+V_C-V_0 cos(\omega t)=-l\frac{dI}{dt}$. Taking another derivative with ...
Pck Tsp's user avatar
  • 73
1 vote
3 answers
148 views

How to Measure Energy of a Electromagnetic Wave accounting also for frequency?

We know a way of measuring energy of a electromagnetic wave is the Poynting vector, which is independent of the frequency. But let's say we want to make two different electromagnetic waves, with ...
DaveTechICX44's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
50 views

How do you extrapolate frequency data from FDTD simulation time data?

Context: Im a PhD student who plans on doing research in theoretical plasmonics/nanophotonics, so I am studying up on understanding FDTD. I am having a bit of a conceptual issue regarding ...
ahrensaj's user avatar
0 votes
2 answers
62 views

How does a string thickness affect the frequency of its harmonics?

The harmonics of a theoretically infinitely small diameter string are pure integer multiples of the fundamental frequency. However, a real string has a thickness, and when vibrating in a harmonic, the ...
Don Rechtman's user avatar
2 votes
0 answers
74 views

Why do you feel ripples by sliding finger on an AC-powered macbook surface?

It doesn't have to be a MacBook exactly, other switched power supply powered metal case devices are good enough, but MacBook is the most common. It must be AC powered; the effect disappears when ...
sergio's user avatar
  • 128
0 votes
0 answers
13 views

Piezoelectric circular plate resonant frequency

I was trying to make a project where I was using piezoelectric. I gave him vibration by making some noise around here, and when I saw the output at DSO, it showed me 49 Hz. but I need resonant ...
Amas's user avatar
  • 1
1 vote
0 answers
65 views

Does our sense of color depend on frequency of source or the wavelength of light?

I was taught that the colors we see are results of the corresponding wavelength, but each wavelength also has a distinct frequency since speed of light is fixed for a specific medium (same goes for ...
Ashutosh's user avatar
  • 167
13 votes
3 answers
4k views

Why do strings in musical instruments have helical shape?

We learn that waves travels in strings under tension, have fundamental frequencies, but I have no luck understanding why don't musical instruments have simple strings with uniform thickness which we ...
Ashutosh's user avatar
  • 167
0 votes
1 answer
74 views

Does two same light bulbs produce light of same frequency? [duplicate]

If they do, then why don't we observe interference in normal rooms? And if they don't have the same frequency then why is that so?
SumitBhatt's user avatar
0 votes
2 answers
93 views

Does rhythm create pitch?

As in, matter (a physical object) that is vibrating = a pitch And secondly If we calculate bpm with a “tick” which is just indefinite pitched percussion, how does an indefinite pitched beat compare to ...
Lecifer's user avatar
  • 109
0 votes
2 answers
95 views

What is the colour of an atom? [closed]

We know that when an electron jumps from shell to shell it produces light waves which produce the sensation of vision to our eyes. But can anything be said about the colour of an atom in particular. ...
Soumyadip Das's user avatar
3 votes
1 answer
35 views

Allan deviation power expansion

In the 'Hand Book of Frequency Analysis' S3.2, by W.J Riley the frequency stability of an oscillator is expressed as a combination of power-law noises of the form $S(f)\propto f^\alpha$, where $f$ is ...
jamie1989's user avatar
  • 1,806
0 votes
0 answers
45 views

Does Color change happen under a prism? [duplicate]

I was watching this video. It Showed that light ( green ) changes its color to red after incidence of light. I couldn't think of how this happens because light's color is dependent on frequency rather ...
Razz's user avatar
  • 441
-1 votes
1 answer
25 views

Does the Doppler effect change frequency?

Would a high-pitched unhearable frequency be heard whilst the doppler effect is in play? For example, when a car uses its horn whilst travelling by, the pitch shifts as it passes - which is the ...
Sam 's user avatar
  • 1
0 votes
2 answers
105 views

Resistors in high frequency

My question is this: Can we use ordinary resistors like those we use in labs(1.2K ohm), in high frequency (like 4GHz)?
Hamidreza Moosavie Arsenal's user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
61 views

What is heard when a tuning fork is struck?

When a tuning fork is struck I hear two tones. From a distance I can hear a high octave frequency of the pitch of the tuning fork. Though, if I listen to it closely (closer to my ears), I also hear a ...
Lecifer's user avatar
  • 109

1
2 3 4 5
30