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5 votes
2 answers
92 views

Why does my curry "bounce back" after stirring?

I recently cooked a big pot of curry, consisting largely of coconut milk, a bit of chicken stock and some vegetables. You can probably imagine that it was somewhat thick in consistency. The cooking ...
paulina's user avatar
  • 1,897
10 votes
5 answers
3k views

Why does microwave take more time to heat more food?

As I understand, a microwave works by generating an electromagnetic field. As food enters this field, waves will transfer energy to those food particles that are intercepted by waves, and those ...
Maurice's user avatar
  • 101
6 votes
1 answer
660 views

Why cookies don't soak linearly in function of temperature?

I like to soak cookies in large coffee mug for breakfast. As a direct result of this, sometimes I try to soak the cookie in too quickly. The whole story is this: When I try to soak the cookie in and ...
LowFieldTheory's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
84 views

A bit funny practical task: frozen dumplings in boiled water, how temperature changes and when will boil again?

This is my question: I take a pot with boiling water (temperature of water is equal to boiling temperature), water was boiled in tea can I take frozen dumplings Now I put dumplings into the pot Only ...
renathy's user avatar
  • 153
14 votes
2 answers
373 views

Patterns on melted, then solidified chocolate

Observation I have melted some chocolate (in a bain-marie, or water-bath) in a bowl, and then turned off the stove. I let the hot and liquid chocolate stand there, letting it cool for a few hours at ...
DominikS's user avatar
  • 249
1 vote
2 answers
106 views

An egg gets soft before it gets hard [closed]

I found in a book from 1500's that says that when you cook an egg (I assume a raw egg), it will get softer before it gets harder. Is that accepted by the science community today? Can someone explain ...
user382541's user avatar
1 vote
3 answers
274 views

Does food stay hotter if you keep air in the bag?

If I am taking takeout home in a plastic bag, is it better to remove all air from the bag when sealing it so no heat is lost to the surrounding air or keep air in the bag acting effectively like ...
reesespieces's user avatar
2 votes
1 answer
459 views

Pressure cooker becomes pressurized again after closing and opening?

While cooking food in my pressure cooker today, I pulled the whistle using my spatula to let the steam off before I opened it to check on how well cooked the food was. Before, I opened the pressure ...
Cathartic Encephalopathy's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
46 views

Can food be cooked in vacuum by bombarding it with nitrogen at high velocity?

Line of thought: Hot air can cook food Hot air is (mainly) nitrogen moving quickly, bouncing off other air molecules and sometimes striking the food and transferring heat to it. So can you cook food ...
RoboTeddy's user avatar
5 votes
1 answer
233 views

Why did this happen to my pennine?

I went to check on my pasta and found it in a rather odd configuration. (Originally, all the pasta was standing together; the few loose ones there are because I had picked up the pot, semi-drained it,...
Luke Sawczak's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
347 views

Will stainless steel heat up faster than a cordierite-based surface in a gas oven?

Background: As some may know, pizza stones, used to accumulate heat before the pizza dough is put into the oven, are often made of cordierite. If it's well heated it should provide the underside of ...
TLSO's user avatar
  • 201
14 votes
7 answers
5k views

Microwave inside-out cooking true/false

The wikipedia article on microwave ovens says Another misconception is that microwave ovens cook food "from the inside out", meaning from the center of the entire mass of food outwards. It ...
Erhannis's user avatar
  • 327
4 votes
3 answers
395 views

How does the physics of the rotation behaviour of the Roti can be explained?

Many times we see in kitchen when someone makes Roti, they first take the atta (flour) and make a circle shape (not perfect but ideal case let it be) we often see when the roller is moved above it to ...
Orion_Pax's user avatar
  • 512
4 votes
2 answers
369 views

Can you superheat coffee?

As far as I know, heating clean water can lead to superheating to over 100 degrees but how clean does it have to be? Coffee is almost all water but is it clean enough to lead to superheating? What ...
Some Student's user avatar
  • 1,297
2 votes
1 answer
471 views

What causes the "screaming" sound from sausages when cooking them?

I saw this Youtube clip and wondered what's causing the screaming sounds? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2Qz_8zxEGho&ab_channel=perhoskoira Something to do with the cooking oil and how it reacts ...
Mac_79's user avatar
  • 415
10 votes
3 answers
2k views

Why do franks (hot dogs) get wavy shaped when boiled?

I have noticed that whenever you buy franks (frankfurters), they come in the package straight. But whenever I boil them in water, they get wavy shaped. I believe the world is fundamentally quantum, so ...
Árpád Szendrei's user avatar
7 votes
1 answer
694 views

Why do some oranges freeze while others don't at the same temperature?

I buy fresh oranges wholesale so I could enjoy fresh juice every morning, I store them in the fridge (not the freezer) so they can last for a few weeks (yes, about 60% of my fridge content at any ...
Alex Morales's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
3k views

Why does piercing plastic film lid before microwaving help?

I've done this many times: buy food in a plastic box covered by a very thin plastic film. The instructions say simply: stab the film with a fork, several times microwave it eat it I was very ...
Captain Trojan's user avatar
5 votes
1 answer
231 views

Why do cocoa and flour do *that thing*, with the clumping, when mixed with liquid?

You're getting ready to make hot chocolate, or maybe a roux. You put the cocoa or flour in the milk. You stir. The milk is still milky. There are lumps, clumped together, of the powders. If you "...
JohnnyApplesauce's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
516 views

How does a microwave steamer work?

While I am no physicist, I am convinced this is a physics question: How does a microwave steamer work? It seems like a scam to me. Wouldn't the microwave be cooking the food and heating the water at ...
Black Tea's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
58 views

How do I calculate equilibrium temperature of a pot of water with some food in it, knowing only the equilibrium temperature of the pot of water? [closed]

Say I have a pot with 3L water on a stovetop, at an equilibrium temperature of 75ºC. I then add 1kg of meat at 20ºC to it. How do I calculate the final equilibrium temperature I should expect the pot'...
MrSimplemaker's user avatar
18 votes
3 answers
2k views

When a microwave oven stops, why are unpopped kernels very hot and popped kernels not hot?

A commonplace empirical observation is that when a microwave oven stops, unpopped kernels are very hot (it's physically painful to touch them) and popped kernels are not. Is there an elementary (or ...
Michael Hardy's user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
40 views

Why does bologna inflate radially when on stove?

I noticed that when heating up bologna in any way it inflates at the center, while other stuff tends to let the air escape sideways, or inflates in different places, like an egg or sausage. Nothing so ...
STOI's user avatar
  • 286
8 votes
2 answers
4k views

Microwaves: why do they cook food?

I have looked up several explanations of microwaves and how they work but I am unclear on a few key parts of how they actually make the food hotter. How I understand it now: In addition to the light ...
brothman01's user avatar
20 votes
3 answers
3k views

Why does chocolate burn if you microwave it with milk?

Chocolate Science! I melt 3 spoons of dark chocolate in microwave oven in low. It melts in 3 minutes and it's just mildly warm. I add half a spoon of milk which makes it a bit cold again. So I ...
Anonymous's user avatar
  • 311
2 votes
0 answers
131 views

Thermoelectric cooler's Qmax cites maximum heat transfer — how is it so close to rated wattage considering TEC's low efficiency?

Some background regarding my question: I'm thinking if making some sort of TEC-based ice cream maker. Considering the combined specific heat capacities, I calculated (possibly incorrectly) the value ...
TLSO's user avatar
  • 201
2 votes
1 answer
71 views

How would cooking change at 1km depth under sea?

A chimpanzee has just returned to the surface after extended time at 1km depth, breathing trimix air. This brings the possibility of hyperbaric habitation, however how would the basic functions of ...
Vogon Poet's user avatar
-2 votes
1 answer
397 views

Does the fermentation of batter increase its weight?

Indian dishes like the Idli and the Dosa are prepared from a fermented batter composed of mainly rice and black grams. (See here for more information on the preparation.) Would the fermentation ...
Nadhas's user avatar
  • 97
0 votes
1 answer
93 views

Settling effect of crumbs in food [duplicate]

What is the physical principle behind the following behavior: When left with the remainder of a bag of chips, or cookie crumbs, etc., when shaking this container, the smaller particles will settle to ...
Jason P Sallinger's user avatar
54 votes
3 answers
10k views

Why is Microwaved mac & cheese burnt where they touch?

After reheating cold about 1.5 oz. of Annie's Mac & Cheese shells for 15 seconds on high power in the microwave, the mac & cheese was burnt black only at certain points where the pasta is ...
Zooky's user avatar
  • 521
15 votes
5 answers
2k views

How do we calculate energy of food?

Here is the problem, according to me: In a classic hamburger, according to my internet research, approximately 906 kJ are contained. Now take a car of 1 000 kilograms, and push it to 30 m/s. It has ...
totalMongot's user avatar
8 votes
1 answer
556 views

Why is pizza soggy after microwaving?

Compared to when heated over fire, pizza is soggy when heated in a microwave oven. I want to know why this is. So far I’ve just learnt that microwaves in ovens are of a specific frequency of ...
Hisham's user avatar
  • 1,821
1 vote
1 answer
894 views

Why hot soup is tastier than cold soup? [closed]

My physics teacher recently asked me this question. Can anyone answer the question?
CodeXxxx's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
4k views

Antimatter particle in bananas [duplicate]

I recently came to know that banana produces antimatter. How does this happen and why doesn't the antimatter annihilate as our Earth has matter. I looked for a relevant answer but could not find it.
Salazar's user avatar
  • 35
4 votes
2 answers
1k views

Why do turkey bacon slices form bubbles in the same places?

Often, turkey bacon forms large bubbles when cooking. It's simply a fact of how it cooks. More interestingly however, I was making turkey bacon this morning when I noticed that all of the slices ...
TheEnvironmentalist's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
2k views

Boiling potatoes

If the temperature of boiling water is about 100 ºC (depending on air pressure), why are boiled potatoes on a high stove flame cooked faster? From the English Wikipedia: Acrylamide was discovered ...
rapt's user avatar
  • 113
1 vote
1 answer
421 views

What make an egg explode in the microwave

I think it's related to the air pouch in the egg, but I'd like to have a full physics explanation. What are the forces in presence? What are the tricks to prevent the explosion?
Quidam's user avatar
  • 113
0 votes
2 answers
1k views

Why pressure cooker is more effective in cooking than any vessel?

Why do we prefer cooking/boiling food in pressure cooker, I know there is a reason but don't know what is it? I can't show my work here as it is a conceptual question.
Vidyanshu Mishra's user avatar
3 votes
2 answers
3k views

Do foods with water exceed 100° celsius in the oven?

I was thinking that water in liquid state can't normally be much above 100 degrees celsius because it boils, so probably foods with lots of water like vegetables don't warm more than 100 degrees. Does ...
Santropedro's user avatar
  • 1,426
4 votes
1 answer
21k views

Why does the food in the microwave heat up but the bowl doesn't?

I put a 1/4 inch thick clear glass container into the microwave with a plate on top and put it in for almost 5 minutes (there was lots of soup). When It came out the soup was really hot but I could ...
EasyPeasy's user avatar
  • 835
-1 votes
2 answers
15k views

Physical reason of adding salt when we're cooking rice (osmosis)

Why do we add salt when we're cooking rice? I know one reason is related to the boiling point of water but someone said it is also related to "Osmosis". What is the relation between adding salt and ...
titansarus's user avatar
5 votes
2 answers
6k views

Which way the water evaporate faster?

-Hello everyone, Yesterday I was preparing some tomato sauce and, in order to remove some water from the sauce, I put it in a pot on the burner and waited until it started to evaporate. When I sow a ...
Rocco Mancin's user avatar
10 votes
4 answers
28k views

Why do we use microwaves in microwave oven?

We know that any object above absolute zero emits electromagnetic radiation. The hotter the object, the shorter the wavelengths. In the electromagnetic radiation spectrum, radio waves have the longest ...
Bhavesh's user avatar
  • 1,925
29 votes
3 answers
53k views

How do microwaves heat moisture-free items?

Today I learnt that microwaves heat food by blasting electromagnetic waves through the water molecules found in the food. Does that mean food with 0% moisture (if such a thing exists - dried spices?) ...
Daniel Wilson's user avatar
1 vote
0 answers
41 views

Why does coke fizz more when you add ice [duplicate]

Why does coke fizz more when you add ice to it?
Pranay Aryal's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
2k views

Does stew lose more liquid if stirred as it cools?

Suppose I cook a stew or soup and then take it off of the stove and leave it uncovered to cool. Of course, it will cool faster if I stir it (more surface area), but it will, eventually, cool to room ...
msh210's user avatar
  • 421
4 votes
1 answer
412 views

Boiling Pasta resulting in a Torus like shape?

I noticed when I was boiling pasta the other day that the pasta uniformly spread out and formed a donut like torus. Why does this happen? Does it have to do with the shape of the pot? I tried to take ...
Gödel's user avatar
  • 1,072
4 votes
0 answers
3k views

How much energy does it take to cook a steak?

Grilling in the park today I started to wonder just how implausible a portable battery-powered grill would be. There are of course a lot of parameters in this question, so let's narrow it down for now:...
Erik Vesteraas's user avatar
3 votes
3 answers
2k views

How could I determine the temperature at which an egg explodes

A while back, some friends and I pondered "what will happen to an egg if placed very near a campfire". So we placed an egg on a grill, approximately 12 inches above a real campfire. Something like 7-...
JohnAllen's user avatar
  • 289
13 votes
4 answers
2k views

Can we detect whether food has previously been heated in a microwave oven?

An acquaintance told me that she refuses to eat microwaved food because she read that the microwave changes the molecules of the food somehow. Her statement is vague and her sources are dubious but I ...
Robert's user avatar
  • 1,101