The Stack Overflow podcast is back! Listen to an interview with our new CEO.

Questions tagged [electrons]

Negatively charged particle with spin 1/2. A component of mundane terrestrial matter, and part of all neutral atoms and molecules. It has a mass about 1/1800 that of a proton. Its antiparticle is the positron.

388 questions with no upvoted or accepted answers
Filter by
Sorted by
Tagged with
1
vote
1answer
281 views

Difference between ionization and scattering of electrons

My question is rather simple but puzzles me altogether. I'm just studying electron stopping power and I see in few graphs (particularly fig. 30.11 in PDG booklet) that Moller and Bhabha scattering are ...
1
vote
0answers
128 views

Practical application of the Drude model

I am trying to gain a better understanding of the Drude model. I understand that the Drude model is used to look at movements of electrons with in a material. My question is, what, if any, are the ...
1
vote
1answer
89 views

Electron capture and ionisation potential

How does the phenomenon of electron capture affect the ionisation potential of an electron within the atom? Since the electron being captured reacts with one proton in the nucleus to give a neutron(...
1
vote
2answers
294 views

Is the Pauli exclusion principle also involved in free electrons?

Imagine I want to make a laser of electrons like a laser of light. Is that possible, or does the Pauli exclusion principle prohibit that?
1
vote
0answers
134 views

Rotating fermion and spin structure on manifold

We know that doing a 2$\pi$ rotation would give a minus sign to wavefunctions of electrons. Since electrons are spin $1/2$ objects. How is this related to the spin structure on the manifold in which ...
1
vote
0answers
37 views

possibility of interference of electrons during its transition from higher to lower state

They say an electron possesses dual nature (what we call wave-particle duality in order to relate with our everyday world). If it is an electron (definite particle) it too shows wave-like phenomenon ...
1
vote
1answer
100 views

Can an electron make quadrupole gravitational waves?

A gravitational wave is a quadrupole wave. Now when an electron is accelerated it usually emits a photon. But can an electron also emits an gravitational wave? If so how does it 'make' an quadrupole ...
1
vote
0answers
166 views

How do we know that electrons are affected by gravity?

There are some theories of gravity which explain it as emerging from other fundamental forces. To better understand the evidence for and against these theories, I would like to have a better ...
1
vote
0answers
38 views

How does a linearly polarized spin 1/2 wave look like?

Spin 1 waves are easy to illustrate and a linearly polarized spin 2 wave looks like this, but what is the counterpart for a spin 1/2 wave?
1
vote
0answers
33 views

Can orbital angular momentum of an electron be changed?

In a lab at my university they are working on a project that deals with changing the "net magnetization" of a material by "flipping" the spins on some electrons. Is orbital angular momentum not ...
1
vote
1answer
56 views

Loss when transfering electrial energy

Let's say we want to transfer a given amount of electrical energy $E$. We could do this with a voltage of $100\,\rm{V}$, but it's better to transform the voltage to $1000\,\rm{V}$, hence the loss of ...
1
vote
1answer
198 views

Photoelectric effect on charged plate

As far as I know, to observe the photoelectric effect, one has to expose a metal surface to high-energy radiation. But what happens if the surface has a surplus of electrons? What is the energy needed ...
1
vote
0answers
375 views

if copper is heated, does it become negatively charged?

i'm reading "Electronics for inventors" and there's this part where it says that free electrons never escape material due to electrostatic attraction with positive ions, but if heated, electrons are ...
1
vote
0answers
116 views

Single particle approximation for a conduction band electron?

I have a problem which on some levels appears very simple, but others quite complex so I thought I'd ask here to make sure I am on the right track before going ahead any further I have a 3D potential ...
1
vote
0answers
90 views

Biot-savart's Law and mass of an electon

One of the my questions is that in Physics lab we use the Biot-Savart law to derive the equation to get Mass of Electron. $B=(8\mu_0NI)/(\sqrt{125}\cdot a)$ I started by trying to integrate both ...
1
vote
0answers
47 views

Voltage drop along electron beam

A focused electron beam represents a current and unless the charges (electrons) meet no resistance to their movement there should be a voltage drop along the length of the beam. So, assuming the beam ...
1
vote
0answers
87 views

What's the equation for the magnetic field created by a single moving electron?

Suppose we have an electron moving in a straight line with velocity $v$. My question is: What is the equation that describes the magnetic field generated by this movement. I'm unsure how to proceed ...
1
vote
0answers
76 views

What would happen if a monochromatic light falls on an electron?

An electron is not strictly free, but in terms of QFT, we consider scattering events in an asymptotic framework where free particles would arise at $t \rightarrow \pm \infty$. So, I would like to know ...
1
vote
0answers
105 views

Helium 3 atoms as fermions?

Helium atoms are composite particles so a priori their "single-particle" (in this case single atom) state is very complicated. They are nevertheless well-modeled by elementary fermions models like ...
1
vote
3answers
443 views

In a photovoltaic effect, when the electron absorbes the photon, is the electron's energy displaced?

I'm a super amateur wannabe physicist, and I'm trying to learn the fundamental workings of the photovoltaic effect. I haven't been able to understand "how" or "what" is displaced/transmitted in the ...
1
vote
0answers
114 views

Creation of entangled electrons

If one obtains two entangled in polarization photons by parametric down conversion and one of them is accepted by and electron 1 and other by electron 2 - are this electrons now entangled in spin?
1
vote
0answers
70 views

Two double slit experiments after each other

Does the act of observation forever destroy a photon or electron's wave like behaviour? What would the result be if the electron was observed, and instead of displaying the two lines or particle like ...
1
vote
0answers
40 views

Does the double split experiment set boundaries to the concept of localization?

Feynman's textbook on quantum mechanics starts with the double split experiment for single electrons, see chapter 1-5. The astonishing result is the self-interference of the single electron as long as ...
1
vote
1answer
75 views

Are differences between elements besides the number of valence electrons negligible in forming matter and giving certain properties?

We were talking about life complexity, I don't know almost anything about physics, he told me that differences between elements beside the number of valence electrons are negligible and elements with ...
1
vote
0answers
46 views

Do electrons move easier depending on the way a TIG tungsten head is grinded?

I'm in a TIG welding course, and during the course we (inevitably) messed up a few (suicidal) tungsten heads by grazing/suicide dive into the molten puddle during operation. Standard procedure is to ...
1
vote
0answers
55 views

Spherical Aberration Of Electron Lenses

I would like to know why electron lenses can't have negative spherical aberration. Every textbook I have found devotes one or two sentences to saying that Otto Scherzer prooved this 80 years ago, but ...
1
vote
0answers
151 views

Exploiting Resonance to Make a Bound State with Gamma Rays (and other Very High Energy Particles)

One obvious consequence of any finite potential is that a high enough energy wave-function will not form a bound state, either they are high enough energy they will generally just bypass the barrier ...
1
vote
0answers
128 views

How to count total spin degeneracies for many spin one half particles?

Given the spin operator for particle $j$ \begin{align} \bar{S}_{j} = \left( \bigotimes_{k=1}^{j-1} I_{k} \right) \otimes \left(\tfrac{\hbar}{2}\bar{\sigma}\right)_{j} \otimes \left( \bigotimes_{k=j+1}^...
1
vote
0answers
114 views

Superimposed hydrogen electron states

I have been following an Edx.org course on Quantum Computing. The Prof. has started with a Hydrogen atom qubit, assuming that the electron can only be in the ground state and the first excited state. ...
1
vote
0answers
529 views

How does electron excitation work for the Bohr model with non hydrogen atoms?

I've seen a lot of explanations of electron excitation by photons in the Bohr model but they all use a hydrogen atom which only has one electron. How does the excitation work for atoms with more ...
1
vote
0answers
36 views

Does illuminating a conductor with light energy less than its workfunction change the measured conductivity?

For example, does the light absorbed in an exposed metal wire increase the average velocity of the electrons, hence increasing mobility and conductance?
1
vote
0answers
83 views

What happens to a photon sent to an atom has no electrons?

Suppose that there is an atom has no electrons. If we sent a photon to this atom, what would happen? Reflected or absorbed?
1
vote
0answers
111 views

Diamagnetism of a degenerate electron gas for weak fields

In the book "Statistical Physics, Part I ($3^{{\rm rd}}$ edition)" by Landau and Lifshitz, at $\S59$ when he treats the diamagnetic part of the magnetisation of a degenerate electron gas for weak ...
1
vote
0answers
421 views

Including special relativistic effects in momentum in Heisenberg's Uncertainty Principle

I've been told that an electron is somewhere within the space of $10^{-10}m$ and am supposed to find the uncertainty in its velocity. Simply applying $m\Delta x \Delta v \geq \frac{h}{4\pi}$ results ...
1
vote
0answers
67 views

Electron and photon interaction

Assuming I shoot a beam of light to an electron, the electron will take the energy and reemit EMR at all direction randomly? If it will, is it happening at the same time?
1
vote
0answers
346 views

Why are free electrons always moving?

Electrons move when a field acts on them. If the electrons move towards the field, they cancel out the field when enough electrons build up. Shouldn't the free electrons stop moving eventually and ...
1
vote
0answers
78 views

Ballistic Conduction - Difference between Bosonic and Fermionic Transport

Ballistic Conduction is the phenomenon of an ideal conduction environment for quantum particles - for electrons the Ballistic Conduction is not infinity, but is proportional to the difference between ...
1
vote
0answers
57 views

pressure required for displacing a single electron off a crystal

I need to know this for my project- "power generation using the pressure applied on a keypad of a mobile electronic device". How much pressure does it take to displace a single electron off its ...
1
vote
1answer
50 views

What makes a atom more likely to become a cation (lose electron)

What makes an atom more likely to lose an electron and become a cation? Does the exact location of the electrons maybe influence that? I know that you can't know the exact position of an electron ...
1
vote
1answer
68 views

What happens in the case that the incident light on an atom has photons with insufficient energies to excite an electron?

When an atom of an element is irradiated with a monochromatic light, what will happen in the case that the frequency of the light does not match the frequency needed for any of the several possible ...
1
vote
2answers
276 views

Does an electron change the electric field in a parallel plate capacitor?

We know that the normal electric field direction in a parallel plate capacitor normally goes from the positive plate to the negative plate, so going from a high potential to low potential. Thus, if we ...
1
vote
1answer
32 views

If iI have a capacitor connected to a battery can the negative charge be sent to an insulated object

If I have a capacitor permanently connected to a battery, that is lets say setting in a plastic bowl, and then run a wire from the negative of the battery to a non grounded object, say a metal can ...
1
vote
1answer
590 views

Can electrons reflect light?

Lately, I have been watching sparks while connecting my electronic devices and I can notice that electricity is kind of blue, and theoretically it's blue because it reflects blue wavelengths?? And ...
1
vote
1answer
83 views

Under what conditions is it possible to ionize atoms using an electron gun?

Using the electron bombardment method, if I wanted to ionize, for example, Xenon gas electrons with an electron gun, under what conditions is it possible to do so? (Heat, pressure?)
1
vote
1answer
76 views

How does the interaction between individual electrons of beams affects the diffraction pattern?

Consider the diffraction of an electron beam. How does the interaction between individual electrons of beams affects the diffraction pattern? If it really affects the diffraction pattern, then is it ...
0
votes
0answers
27 views

What exactly is a coefficient of friction due to electron stopping?

To be more specific, I am looking to understand what electron stopping is and how I could possibly define a coefficient of friction due to electron stopping. I am running MD simulations using LAMMPS ...
0
votes
0answers
23 views

What is the meaning of 'sputtering' in Ion pumps

So after reading a few articles this is what I understand: Air enters the pump through diffusion In the pump there is a cloud of electrons between two (grounded) cathodes As soon as an electron hits ...
0
votes
0answers
11 views

What is the nature of the multipoles used to shape/re-direct an e-beam?

Imagine having an electron beam, just like in an electron microscope. Now imagine that we have some multipoles prepared in the beams path to influence the shape/path of the beam. My question is: ...
0
votes
0answers
18 views

Electrons' distribution inside bands

If you consider a crystal of silicon made by $N$ atoms, you know that there will be a valence band with $4N$ possible levels of energy for electrons and a conduction band with $4N$ possible levels of ...
0
votes
0answers
30 views

Are electrons in a singlet state still electrons?

Given that some interactions such as electron capture make the electron "disappear" and the output fermion is a neutrino, I wonder what is the rationale behind saying that in the case of two opposite ...