Questions tagged [electrons]

Negatively charged particle with spin 1/2. A component of mundane terrestrial matter, and part of all neutral atoms and molecules. It has a mass about 1/1800 that of a proton. Its antiparticle is the positron.

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Quantum mechanical picture of “electrons orbiting the nucleus”

Given the wavefunction, $\psi$ is explained as the flow of probabilities or in other words probability density over a certain region of space. In the case of electrons, say in $s$ orbital, the ...
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Why can't an energy level exist containing 0.9 electron wave wavelengths? Why must it be a whole number? [duplicate]

So, I was reading Atom: Journey Across The Subatomic Cosmos by Isaac Asimov in order to better understand quantum mechanics when I came across this sentence: The electron couldn't spiral into the ...
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Creation of entangled electrons

If one obtains two entangled in polarization photons by parametric down conversion and one of them is accepted by and electron 1 and other by electron 2 - are this electrons now entangled in spin?
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Photoelectric effect and work function

In a photoelectric effect we remove electrons from a metal using high energy photons, the work function is the minimal energy required for this effect. My question is why doesnt the work fucntion ...
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Why is charge of the electron negative?

How did scientists figure out that the charge of the electron was indeed negative? I know how the cathode ray tube experiment works, but how did Thompson know that the plate that the cathode ray beam ...
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Saturated BJT Transistors. V CE < V BE : AKA - Things that make you go “Hmmmm”

At the risk of being blasted for cross-posting, I am posting this question again here in the Physics department. It is a duplicate of this post in the EE forum. However, I would like to get some ...
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What came first, neutrons or electrons? [closed]

I wonder if electrons were first (at an early stage of the cosmos) embedded into neutrons, making it easier to understand why they would fit so well with protons later, or if the genesis of electrons ...
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Why does an electron have left-handed and right-handed components? [duplicate]

An electron is assumed to be a point particle that does not have structure. Why does it have left-handed and right-handed components? Does this imply that the electron has structure or volume?
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Interpretation of Dirac equation states for moving electron

I try to understand a physical interpretation of the four components of the Dirac 4-spinor for a moving electron (in the simplest case, a plane wave). There is a very good question and answer about ...
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When an electron changes its spin, or any other intrinsic property, is it still the same electron?

I am not asking why an intrinsic property, like spin can have more then a single value. I understand particles (electrons) can come to existence with either up or down spin. I am asking why it can ...
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The problem of infinite energy of electron as point charge?

Imagine empty infinite universe with just a single resting electron - let's ask the question about configuration of electric field in such empty universe. The standard answer would be $E\propto 1/r^2$...
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Why don't free electrons escape from a conductor?

The thermal velocity of the free electron in a metallic conductor varies from $10^5\ \mathrm{m/s}$ to $10^6\ \mathrm{m/s}$. In spite of high velocity, free electrons fail to escape from the metallic ...
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Does 'electricity' have mass? Is 'electricity' tangible?

Background: I'm in a legal academic discussion about the status of electronic 'goods' and whether they qualify as 'goods' in the same way a chair and a pen do. In this context (and specifically at the ...
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How many photons can an electron absorb and why?

How many photons can an electron absorb and why? Can all fundamental particles that can absorb photons absorb the same amount of photons and why? If we increase the velocity of a fundamental particle, ...
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How do electrons get a charge?

Electrons belong to a group of elementary particles called leptons. There are charged and neutral leptons. And electron is the charged one. But how come it got charged? The negative or positive ...
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Why do electrons tend to be in energy eigenstates?

An oft cited problem with the planetary model of hydrogen is that, if the electron were in fact classically orbiting the proton, then it would radiate away all of its energy and fall into the nucleus. ...
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If a neutron decays to proton + electron, and a proton can decay into neutron + positron, doesn't this mean neutron = neutron + electron + positron?

I was just watching some videos and came across beta+ radiation (when a positron is emitted). It then occurred to me, how can the following be true, given that a positron and an electron have the same ...
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Do protons exchange photons with electrons?

I'm sorry for this question but, I just don't get it. According to the electromagnetic field theory, electrons repel each other by exchanging photons. How do protons attract electrons, by photon ...
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Are the electrons at the centre of the Sun degenerate or not?

Trying to find an answer to this question, I came across two different methods of determining whether electrons at the center of the sun are degenerate or not. The first method, used here, calculates ...
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How do electrons know when a circuit is closed?

I was told that electrons do not begin flowing unless the circuit is closed. The electrons from the battery are not in the ends of wire when it is open, apparently, as there is no reason for them to ...
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Why doesn't gravity mess up the double slit experiment?

So let's say you are doing a double slit experiment. Also, let's use electrons. My question is, won't the gravity of the electron affect the earth, thereby causing it decoherence and its wave ...
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Can we stop electrons from moving? [closed]

We know that electrons have a dual nature just like EM waves (of course all the materials are said to have dual nature, noticeable or not). So looking at the wave nature of an electron and comparing ...
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Does electron have some intrinsic ~$10^{21}$ Hz oscillations (de Broglie's clock/Zitterbewegung)?

Louis De Broglie has postulated in 1924 that with electron's mass there comes some $\approx 10^{21}$Hz inner oscillation: $E=mc^2=h f=\hbar \omega$. We would get such oscillation e.g. if using $E=mc^...
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Can you please show me a final atomic model which demonstrates movement of electrons inside it? [closed]

Is there any final model of an atom, of which we can say, “This is it”! Or is it still improving and physicists are not completely sure about it? I am particularly interested to know how exactly ...
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At an atomic level, what happens when you connect two batteries in series so that their voltages are added?

I can't for the life of me figure this out. I feel like i'm missing some crucial detail about how batteries work. Imagine two batteries connected in series, like this: ...
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In electromagnetic radiation, how do electrons actually “move”?

I've always pictured EM radiation as a wave, in common drawings of radiation you would see it as a wave beam and that had clouded my understanding recently. Illustration on the simplest level: Which ...
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How does an electron jump from one lobe to another of the same hourglass-shaped $2p_x$-orbital?

Imagine an electron in the hourglass-shaped $2p_x$-orbital. It has two lobes. The probability of it being in the centre of the orbital is zero. This is the point that connects the two lobes of the ...
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If an electron is in ground state, why can't it lose any more energy?

As far as I know, an electron can't go below what is known as the ground state, which has an energy of -13.6 eV, but why can't it lose any more energy? is there a deeper explanation or is this ...
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Why is the bottom part of a candle flame blue?

What’s the explanation behind the bottom part of a candle flame being blue? I googled hard in vain. I read this. I don’t understand how it’s explained by the emission of excited molecular radicals in ...
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Why is an electron negatively charged, and what is the difference between negative and positive charges?

Nobody has yet defined the actual meaning of a charge, or why a negative charge is different from a positive charge. Everybody knows that positive charge is due to protons and negative charge is due ...
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How strong is electron degeneracy pressure?

I'm trying to get some specific numbers for electron degeneracy that I can understand, using a concrete example. Take for example this portion of carbon crystal: Exactly how much energy would be ...
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What is the difference between a neutron and hydrogen?

Differences? They are both an electron and a proton, since the neutron decays to a proton and an electron, what's the difference between a neutron and proton + electron? so is it just a higher binding ...
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Nearly Free Electron Model and the Reduced Zone Scheme

When for example studying the vibrational modes of a one dimensional diatomic chain we find that the dispersion relation $\omega(k)$ is periodic in the one dimensional reciprocal lattice vector $\frac{...
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How can we describe the electrons of multi-electron atoms (i.e. not Hydrogen) when equations/analytic solutions only exist for Hydrogen?

I've been digging into emission spectra of different elements and found that such things as the Rydberg equation, Bohr's model, and quantum mechanics can only fully describe the single electron in the ...
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When drift velocity equals thermal velocity?

In some papers, I can see the drift velocity of electrons equaling thermal velocity. Can anyone tell me when both almost equal each other?
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How can one describe electron motion around hydrogen atom?

I remember from introductory Quantum Mechanics, that hydrogen atom is one of those systems that we can solve without too much ( embarrassing ) approximations. After a number of postulates, QM ...
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What happens to 5 electrons on a sphere?

Let's suppose we put 5 electrons on a perfectly conducting (no resistance at all) sphere. There's no equilibrium configuration with 5 (though there is with 2, 3, 4 or 6). So will they keep moving on ...
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Is the Higgs field needed to explain the mass of the electron?

The self energy of the electron can be represented in two ways: the energy required to bring a charge distribution from infinity to the size of the electron (assuming it is a point charge with no ...
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Mystery in double slit diffraction of electron

I have already studied the double slit diffraction for electrons, which is a vital reason for why quantum mechanics is required. In this phenomenon we can see that an electron that was considered to ...
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Frequency of an electron

If frequency is defined as the cycles per time, then what is meant by "frequency of an electron"? If it refers to the rotation of electron around a nucleus, then which phenomenon is considered for a ...
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What is the influence of QED vacuum in electron-double-slit experiments?

In a recent question on superpositions of different quarks it was explained, that the superpositions of different electric charged particles cannot exist, in contrast to strangeness quantum number. It ...
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How did we come to know that electrons actually 'move' in an atom?

Rutherford's experiments confirmed the existence of light-weight electron clouds in a mostly empty atom, and that they occupy some space around the nucleus. What made us conclude that they can move? ...
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Direction of current and direction of flow of electrons

My textbook says that the flow of current is from the positive to negative and my notebook say that the flow of electrons is from negative to positive. Why aren't they agreeing on one direction? Who ...
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Why do we need a wave function?

Assuming our only aim is to solve double slit experiment (or other problems that can be mapped into that). Knowing that electron does some strange thing not expected of a particle, we need a function ...
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Speed of electrons in a current-carrying metallic wire: does it even make sense?

Does it make sense to speak about the speed of electrons in a current-carrying wire (non perfect conductor)? If so, what is their speed? Here are my thoughts: On the Internet (Wikipedia, ...
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Is there a term for electron capture outside the nucleus?

My textbook says that electron capture is when an electron is 'captured' by a proton in the nucleus which causes them to turn into a neutron and an electron neutrino. The name kind of suggests it only ...
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How can two electrons repel if it's impossible for free electrons to absorb or emit energy?

There is no acceptable/viable mechanism for a free electron to absorb or emit energy, without violating energy or momentum conservation. So its wavefunction cannot collapse into becoming a particle, ...
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Is there a published upper limit on the electron's electric quadrupole moment?

I understand an electric quadrupole moment is forbidden in the standard electron theory. In this paper considering general relativistic corrections (Kerr-Newman metric around the electron), however, ...
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Does electron being many places at the same time violate Physics laws?

The following passage has been extracted from the book Parallel Worlds, by Michio Kaku: Because of uncertainty, the electron does not exist at any single point, but exists in all possible points ...
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Does Quantum Theory allow an Electron to take a fraction of Photon energy

In Photoelectric Effect of Theory of Spectral Lines , an electron takes the entire or none of the energy of the Photon ( it absorbs the entire quanta not its fractionS resulting in the disappearance ...

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