Questions tagged [electrons]

Negatively charged particle with spin 1/2. A component of mundane terrestrial matter, and part of all neutral atoms and molecules. It has a mass about 1/1800 that of a proton. Its antiparticle is the positron.

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How long does it take for an excited electron to return to ground state?

During a mock Cambridge interview, one of the questions was about how small a computer could theoretically be.The way I approached it was in terms of what something must be to be considered a computer....
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What happens in electron-electron collisions?

What are the results of high energy electron electron collisions? Are other particles created?
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What would happen if Large Hadron Collider would collide electrons?

After some reading about the Large Hadron Collider and it's very impressive instruments to detect and investigate the collision results, there is a remaining question. What would happen if the ...
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Stable muon density inside a white dwarf star?

It occurs to me (though I'm hardly the first) that the decay $$ \mu^- \to e^- + \bar \nu_e + \nu_\mu $$ should be forbidden in electron-degenerate matter, since there must be an empty state available ...
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How does the electrons' magnetic dipole moment get influenced when electrons are moving through a magnetic field?

How does the electrons' magnetic dipole moment get influenced when electrons are moving through a magnetic field? How does the electrons' intrinsic spin influence the direction of the electrons' ...
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Quantum mechanics,and how the law $ΔxΔp≥ℏ/2$ explains the paradox regarding atoms [duplicate]

In Chapter 2-3,Vol I of the Feynman lectures, Feynman talks about a rule in quantum mechanics that says that one cannot know both where something is and how fast it is moving. That the uncertainty of ...
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Why electrons flow through a wire connected to a battery?

I would like to know why does electrons flow through a wire connected to a battery as said in AC/DC: What's the Difference?.It tells that "the electrons that are stripped from the carbon electrode is ...
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Alternating Current Inquires [duplicate]

I have been looking in to alternating current and I am confused. If the voltage reverses doesn't the flow of electrons also reverse? I am aware of another fair answer on this site here. That answer, ...
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Where is spin in the Schroedinger equation of an electron in the hydrogen atom?

In my current quantum mechanics, course, we have derived in full (I believe?) the wave equations for the time-independent stationary states of the hydrogen atom. We are told that the Pauli Exclusion ...
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Is it possible to flow current in open circuit?

As I know a battery is an example of a closed circuit where it can then produce electricity , electrons will flow from negative pole to positive. A chemistry representation of this battery is for ...
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Classical proof of the gyromagnetic ratio $g=2$

I was reading Representing Electrons: A Biographical Approach to Theoretical Entities, by Theodore Arabatzis. At a certain point, where he is explaining the history of the magnetic moment of the ...
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Does electron in wave form have mass?

I heard from my lecturer that electron has dual nature. For that instance in young's double slit experiment electron exhibits as a particle at ends but it acts as a wave in between the ends. It under ...
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How does an electron move around in an orbital? Is it “wave-like” or random?

When an electron is moving around in its orbital, is it actually moving around like a wave, like this video shows? (By wave-like, I mean, the 'electron' in this video is showing it following a ...
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How Does $\epsilon$ Relate to the Dampened Harmonic Motion of Electrons?

I realize that the permittivity $\epsilon$ of a substance is easily calculated based on diffraction angles, but I am not satisfied with merely measuring it experimentally. I wish to understand its ...
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Which derivation of drift velocity is correct?

In the derivation of drift velocity I have seen two variations and want to know which one's correct. $s=ut+\frac{at^2}{2}$ Assume that the drift velocity of any electron in any conductor is : $$\vec{...
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Is there experimental verification of the s, p, d, f orbital shapes?

Have there been any experiments performed (or proposed) to prove that the shapes of the s,p,d,f orbitals correspond to our spatial reality as opposed to just being a figment of the mathematics that ...
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Why doesn't orbital electron fall into the nucleus of Rb85, but falls into the nucleus of Rb83?

Rb83 is unstable and decays to Kr-83. Mode of decay is electron capture. Rb85 is stable. The nuclei Rb83 and Rb85 have the same charge, but Rb85 is heavier than Rb83. While gravity acts more strongly ...
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Relativistic drift velocity of electrons in a superconductor?

Is there a formula for the effective speed of electron currents inside superconductors? The formula for normal conductors is: $$ V = \frac{I}{nAq}$$ I wonder if there are any changes to this ...
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How are cloud chamber tracks consistent with the uncertainty principle?

I have read about the uncertainty principle. As it applies to electrons, how is it that we can get exact tracks of electrons in cloud chambers? That is to say that how is it that the position is fixed?...
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Do electrons move around a circuit?

We could imagine a simple electronic circuit composed by a power source and a resistor. It is usual find descriptions as "The moving charged particles in an electric current are called charge ...
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Fields of a moving electron

Suppose an electron is moving through empty space at speed v. It produces an electric field because it is a charge. But this field changes as it moves. Changing electric field must give rise to ...
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Electric dipole moment of electron: about what point is the moment taken?

There is a lot of experimental research activity into whether the electron has an electric dipole moment. The electron, however, has a net charge, and so its dipole moment $$ {\bf \mu}= \int ({\...
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Active gravitational mass of the electron

In PSE here electrons are added to a sphere and gravitational modifications are expected. My question is: Is there any experiment that show that a negatively charged object is source of a stronger ...
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How do electrons get the energy to jump from one orbital to the next when in stationary orbits the electron does not radiate energy

My Question is how do electrons get energy/lose energy to jump up or down an orbital as in a stationary orbit they do not gain energy and their energy is finite?
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How to explain what an electron is to someone new to physics? [closed]

I've got asked by someone who just graduated school and is about to start studying physics, what exactly is an electron, if it is not "a small ball rotating around the core of an atom". I couldn't ...
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Why does an electron have spin? [duplicate]

An electron is assumed to be a point particle that does not have structure and volume. Why does it have spin? Does this imply that the electron has volume? It is hard to imagine that a point (without ...
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Acceleration of electrons from Cooper pairs and EM radiation

For the question What makes Cooper pairs of electrons so fit for an unhindered current through a superconducting wire? where was a nice comment from CountTo10: Assume any photons are effectively ...
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Ohm's Law Intuition

When we derive Ohm's Law using the Drude Model, we assume at one point of time that $E=V/L$, when is fact, $E=dV/dL$, unless $E$ is constant, in which case the assumption $E=V/L$ is true. But I don't ...
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What is the sum of the electrons' magnetic moments in a wire?

Electrons have magnetic dipole moment. This magnetic moment will be influenced in an electric field in case the electron get moved non-parallel to the current. The magnetic moments will be more or ...
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Speed of electromagnetic interactions

We know that electromagnetic waves fly with the speed of light, but my question not about waves. Consider a very strong electromagnet that creates a substantial field 3 meters away. Then we send a ...
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the type of movement in electron jump between levels? [closed]

what's the type of movement when the electron jump from level to another when gaining or losing a quantum of energy is it actually jump or move in a specific movement?
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What is the reason for extremely high speed of electric current?

I know that electric current is the flow of electrons but electrons have a very slow drift speed (about 2mm/s). How is it that electric current reaches its destination at almost the speed of light?
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Are electrons miniature black holes? [duplicate]

For something to be a blackhole, it must have gravity and the radius must be smaller than the schwarzschild radius for its mass. -Electrons have gravity -Electron are theoretically believed to be ...
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Where are the inaccuracies in the Bohr model of the atom?

The Bohr model of the atom is essentially that the nucleus is a ball and the electrons are balls orbiting the nucleus in a rigid orbit. This allowed for chemists to find a model of chemical bonding ...
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Could a powerful gravitational wave cause electrons to emit light?

I imagine electrons being accelerated by passing gravitational waves, say from a nearby kilonova, so I would expect the electrons to emit light. Am I right?
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How does a spinning electron produce a magnetic field?

I learned in my undergraduate physics class that atoms have magnetic fields produced by the orbit of electrons and the spin of electrons. I understand how an orbit can induce a magnetic field because ...
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Is the electromagnetic mass real?

In his Lectures on Physics vol II Ch.28-2 Feynman calculates the field momentum of a moving charged sphere with charge $q$, radius $a$ and velocity $\mathbf{v}$. He finds that the total momentum in ...
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Why are electrons treated classically in cyclotron measurements?

As I understand , systems having large angular momenta relative to the planck constant (limit of large quantum numbers, e.g. $J/\hbar \to \infty$), can be treated as classical systems. Now in the case ...
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Batteries and voltage?

The voltage of a battery gives you the difference in potential energy 1C of charge would have at the positive terminal vs the negative terminal. If I connect a wire to both terminals, the battery ...
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Negative energy levels in the diagram for a hydrogen atom

The higher the number of the shell (n), the higher is the energy level of the electron. However, why was it necessary to have negative values. So for example, when $n=1$, the energy could be $5 eV$ ...
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Proving that the electronic Schrödinger equation has no closed analytic solutions for >1 electron

It is stated in many books that analytic closed solutions to the time-independent electronic Schrödinger equation, $$\hat{H}\Psi = E\Psi, $$ exist for the one-electron problem (e.g. hydrogen atom, ...
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Path of EM wave propagation in a circuit wire

The image is my visualization of drift velocity and electromagnetic (EM) propagation of charge wave in a closed circuit. The slow drift velocity of the electrons follows the path of the circuit (a ...
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What is the Poynting vector of an electron?

On chapter 27 of "The Feynman Lectures on Physics Volume II: Mainly Electromagnetism and Matter", Richard Feynman says: Finally, in order to really convince you that this theory is obviously nuts, ...
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Electron as a standing wave and its stability

1. When it was an era of classical mechanics we used to believe in the Bohr's atomic model. It interpreted electrons as particles (although I couldn't understand how come Bohr who interpreted ...
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The Dual Nature of Matter

I can't seem to understand the dual nature of matter completely. If electrons have a wave nature, then if two electrons were to collide, wouldn't they undergo interference and form an electron wave ...
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Measuring the spin of a single electron

Is it possible to measure the spin of a single electron? What papers have been published on answering this question? Would the measurement require a super sensitive SQUID, Superconductive Quantum ...
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An electron in $s$ state

If an electron is in $s$ state, for example in 1s state for Hydrogen or 5s state for Silver atom, $\ell=0$. So,its total angular momentum $L$ is also equal to 0. So, what is electron actually doing in ...
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Electrons and Magnetism

Electron at rest generates Electric field. Electron moving without acceleration produces electric and magnetic field. Electron moving with acceleration produces electromagnetic waves. Please explain ...
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How “earthing” electricity work?

I made a simple bulb-battery circuit and then I cut one of the wires and attached both ends to cemented floor, the bulb didn't glow, this means cemented floor is a ...
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How long do electrons take to “decide” how to go through a circuit?

Many other people have asked how an electron decides which path to take, but no one has asked how long do they take. Is there an equation for their "uncertainty" time? Do they decide instantaneously (...