Questions tagged [electrons]

Negatively charged particle with spin 1/2. A component of mundane terrestrial matter, and part of all neutral atoms and molecules. It has a mass about 1/1800 that of a proton. Its antiparticle is the positron.

Filter by
Sorted by
Tagged with
0 votes
2 answers
46 views

Model of a neutron composed of a proton and an electron

Is it possible to establish a model to describe neutrons as electrons and protons bound by the coulomb force? what disadvantages would it have?
user avatar
  • 13
0 votes
0 answers
12 views

Electron Diffraction Pattern (spot in the center)

So in the diffraction pattern of an electron beam (or an electron) in a polycrystaline material we observe rings and a central spot . What's exactly the central spot? Is it not diffracted electrons ...
user avatar
2 votes
1 answer
40 views

Incredible electron drift velocity in atomic thin layer of graphene?

Free electrons in atomic thin layers of graphene behave more like photons (Bosons) than fermions reaching incredible drift velocities and mobility which reach speeds as reported by this article in the ...
user avatar
  • 3,002
0 votes
1 answer
70 views

About why electrons in atom don't radiate(considering wave nature also) [duplicate]

It's said in textbooks that electrons won't radiate and fall into nucleus because matter wave of it's form a standing wave but could somebody explain why being a standing wave it doesn't radiate, even ...
user avatar
3 votes
2 answers
188 views

How does $s$ subshell not have a node in the center despite the nucleus being there?

In most images of $1s$ subshell I see that there's no node shown at the center, and even the formula $n-\ell-1$ gives 0 as the answer. But, isn't the nucleus experimentally proven to be at the center? ...
user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
37 views

Does an electron beam in empty space generate magnetic fields?

Does an electron beam in empty space generate magnetic fields around them just as with current in conductor. Is it experimentally proven that two parallel electron beam would attract each other.
user avatar
  • 85
0 votes
1 answer
44 views

Wave functions for two electrons in an infinite 2D potential well

Consider two electrons in a square 2D infinite potential well i.e $V=0\ for \ 0<x<a, 0<y<a, \ \ V=\infty$ everywhere else. Determine the energy and wavefunction(s) for the first excited ...
user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
29 views

Could bremsstrahlung provide evidence that a Black Hole (BH) forms the underlying geometry of the electron?

There are several proposals that model electrons as BHs. For example, A. Burinskii proposes a spinning soliton on a Kerr-Newman BH geometry (enhanced to an MIT bag model in “New path to unification of ...
user avatar
  • 1
0 votes
2 answers
32 views

Will the random movement of electrons affect the electric field of a negatively-charged solid conducting metal sphere?

When discussing about a negatively-charged solid conducting metal sphere, We agree on a statement that like charges repel so that the negative charges (aka electrons) are evenly distributed on the ...
user avatar
1 vote
3 answers
49 views

Does speed of electrons decreases when they pass through resistance?

What type of energy does battery supply to electrons , as I read battery increases KE of electrons but in load if they lose it then speed will decrease and current will decrease after coming out of ...
user avatar
-1 votes
0 answers
48 views

Are there two types of 'measured electrons'?

As I understand it, we can measure the spin of an electron and after the measurement it will be forever up or down. So are there actually two types of electrons? The ones we already measured the ones ...
user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
12 views

Relativity and current carrying wire: Do electrons, in their proper frame, distance from each other when they accelerate?

We know that, in the lab frame, a wire can be electrical neutral (having a zero charge density everywhere) both while carrying current and while not. This means that in both cases the linear electron ...
user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
48 views

How does the Lorentz force on a wire create macroscopic movement?

In a a current carrying wire exposed to a magnetic field, the electrons will experience a force and hence, a net displacement from. However it is not clear to me how this causes the wire to bend/move ...
user avatar
0 votes
2 answers
52 views

Can we make electron drift velocity faster than light by reducing area of resistor?

We know that $I= nqAV_d$. Can we send high current ($I$) through a "fat wire" (more $A$) then reduce $A$ at the resistor so much that $V_d$ becomes faster than light in order to maintain $I$?...
user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
42 views

What would be the outcomes in this arrangement? would potential varies along a conducting wire? [closed]

Two conducting solid sphere,one with charge Q1 and radius R1 and the other with charge Q2 and radius R2 are kept far away $$Q_1=5Q_2 \text{ and } R_1=5R_2 $$ If these spheres are connected with ...
user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
9 views

What is the standard explanation for tungstens abnormal high Pauling electronegativity?

The electronegativity of tungsten does not follow the common trend along the periodic table.
user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
52 views

Seemingly easy Fleming's question, repeatedly getting wrong answer [closed]

Easy question deceived me and my budding physics ego😃. I solved the question in the following way: Took the field to be parallel to and opposite to the velocity of the electron as that was a fact ...
user avatar
8 votes
5 answers
1k views

Can positrons attract electrons? [duplicate]

Now, it is established that positrons and electrons have the same mass but opposite charges. Since they have opposite charges, do they create a force of attraction and collide thus annihilating each ...
user avatar
2 votes
0 answers
33 views

Para- and ortho-excitons in solids with spin-orbit coupling

The names para- and ortho-exciton stem from the fact that -- in superficial analogy to para- and ortho-hydrogen -- the wave function that forms the electron-hole bound state can either be a singlet ...
user avatar
  • 496
0 votes
0 answers
40 views

Paradoxes of length contraction: does the radius shrink? [duplicate]

Consider this setup: The black circle is the observer, who has a $360^{\circ}$ range of observation around it. In its orbit are other circles, orbiting at relativistic speeds. They are all orbiting ...
user avatar
-1 votes
1 answer
77 views

Why is it when an atom gains a proton it is said to become an 'atom' of a different element?

My confusion lies in that the number of protons in the nucleus will increase but is the number of electrons assumed to automatically follow suit such that the result is a neutral atom with equal ...
user avatar
  • 13
5 votes
5 answers
133 views

Why does the energy of an electron depend on the size of the well?

In the square well the energy states of the electron depend on the width of the square well. That means that by changing the physical shape of the confinement region (making it a parabolic well) or ...
user avatar
  • 73
0 votes
1 answer
39 views

Electron in varying magnetic field

Lets consider an electron that is placed in an existing, constant in space near the electron, magnetic field. Electron is stationary. Magnetic field over time gradually reduces to zero. I assume ...
user avatar
-2 votes
1 answer
67 views

Why the electron having a relative light mass $511keV$ is so small, upper limit $10^{-18}$m, in the SM? [duplicate]

Usually in particle physics larger mass refers to a smaller cross-section of a particle or atom thus a smaller sized particle. How a so relative light mass particle only $511\,\mathrm{keV}$ can be so ...
user avatar
  • 3,002
0 votes
2 answers
80 views

Why does the proton have the same elementary charge value $e$ as the electron? [duplicate]

Maybe a silly question but I am looking for an analytic explanation of it. I think I already have one but I want to see if there is a better one, more fundamental? What does it mean fundamentally ...
user avatar
  • 3,002
0 votes
1 answer
19 views

Motion of the electrons in a electric conductor when connected to a potential difference?

(I am a beginner in physics, so please forgive me if this is stupid.) Normally, under static electric state there is no resultant electric field existing inside a conducting material. But, when a ...
user avatar
11 votes
8 answers
3k views

How can an electron be a point particle but also a wavefunction?

A point particle is a point in space of a fixed co-ordinate. However, the wavefunction must always be spread out in space to be normalizable to unity.
user avatar
  • 917
3 votes
1 answer
65 views

Why is electric field larger in a resistor?

Suppose there is wire with 0 resistance and a resistor between them and that circuit is plugged to nonzero voltage source. Why is the electric field in resistor larger than of the wire? I want to ...
user avatar
0 votes
2 answers
101 views

How were the electrons, protons counted in an atom?

The title says it all! In high school I remember it being taught as a religion, I had to believe the count (hydrogen has 1 proton, carbon has 6 etc...) , but how can I be sure I was told the truth?
user avatar
  • 141
0 votes
0 answers
14 views

How does a collimator collimate an electron beam?

Consider the following schematic diagram of an electron beam source: In the start I thought I had a clear picture of how such a system could collimate an electron source. You have a bunch of anodes ...
user avatar
  • 1,273
4 votes
2 answers
154 views

Coulomb potential vs Coulomb potential energy

I know that the Coulomb potential in a hydrogen atom is $V(x)=\frac{-e^2}{4 \pi \epsilon_{0} r}$. Usually the potential is given by the potential energy divided by the charge, so I would expect $V(r)=\...
user avatar
  • 333
0 votes
0 answers
41 views

Does the classical electron field exist or not? [duplicate]

On one hand, Dirac equation is supposed to be the equation of a classical field that we quantise. On the other hand, I saw many stackexchange posts saying that the classical limit of the electron ...
user avatar
  • 2,763
0 votes
1 answer
48 views

Excitation of electrons from $3p$ to $3d$ in sulphur

In my book it is shown that sulphur in its excited state forms 6 covalent bonds with Fluorine to form SF6 but after the electron is excited does it not dexcite from $3d$ back to $3p$ and $3s$ by ...
user avatar
  • 139
0 votes
0 answers
20 views

Coherent and incoherent electron diffraction

I am learning about electron diffraction in a transmission electron microscope and was wondering about following topic: A single crystalline material will exhibit a diffraction pattern with discrete ...
user avatar
3 votes
2 answers
85 views

What makes a lightbulb glow?

I am self-studying electricity and magnetism, and I am confused about a point. I have learnt that the drift speed of an electron is extremely small. However, according to Drude's model, the electron ...
user avatar
  • 260
4 votes
1 answer
148 views

What would be the implications in the Standard Model if we experimentally verified that the electron charge has an intrinsic electric dipole moment?

It is known also by recent experiments that the electric charge distribution in space of an electron has been measured with great accuracy to be perfect homogeneous thus essentially geometrically a ...
user avatar
  • 3,002
0 votes
1 answer
47 views

Does the $3s$ orbital contain the $2s$ orbital?

The following image is in my introductory chemistry textbook: It seems to imply that the $3s$ orbital “contains” the $2s$ and 1s orbital. That is, a $3s$ electron could find itself in a region of ...
user avatar
1 vote
4 answers
198 views

What's the difference between an electron and a quark?

Could you explain how QFT defines the peculiarity and differences, as to charge, between an electron and a quark? A quark has a fractional charge. Is the Coulomb force proportional to these charges? ...
user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
16 views

We know that nodes are regions where the probability of finding an electron is zero right? [duplicate]

According to the text I'm going through it says, that the probability density has always some value howsoever small it may be at finite distance from the nucleus. So this means that the probability of ...
user avatar
1 vote
5 answers
104 views

Force between two protons

Yesterday my teacher was teaching about the production of photons, he told that photons are produced when the electron move from a higher energy level to a lower energy level then suddenly a idea ...
user avatar
5 votes
3 answers
765 views

What force creates electronegativity?

Electric charge is used to describe the behavior of electrons which seek to counterbalance the positive charge of protons. But I have read about other forces which also attract electrons to atoms, ...
user avatar
1 vote
0 answers
50 views

Electron positron annihilation to more the 3 photons

I understood why a single photon can't be released from the annihilation of an electron and positron and that the common cases are 2 and 3 photons. I have two thing's I'm unsure of: why is the ...
user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
32 views

Centripetal force to charge carriers in curved conductors

Suppose we applied an emf across a circular conductor, then the electrons inside the conductors would drift to the positive side But how does the electrons get centripetal force? Firstly, I ...
user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
35 views

How are electrons moving in a metal rod?

Suppose an electromagnetic wave falls on the length of a metal rod. In what direction would the free electrons there start to move? Up-down or left-right. Intensity vector E is perpendicular to the ...
user avatar
  • 661
0 votes
1 answer
103 views

Why were electrons chosen to be negatively charged? [duplicate]

Wouldn't it make more sense to call electrons positively charged because when they move they make electricity?
user avatar
  • 1
4 votes
1 answer
69 views

Exciton nomenclature

In many publications on electronic excitations I stumbled across a categorisation of excitons (electron-hole quasi-particles), namely A- and B-excitons. Could someone please explain the difference ...
user avatar
  • 496
0 votes
1 answer
65 views

Polaron transformation in quantum optics

I'm trying to understand the so-called polaron transformation as frequently encountered in quantum optics. Take the following paper as example: "Quantum dot cavity-QED in the presence of strong ...
user avatar
3 votes
3 answers
135 views

Are there in nature any Right Chiral isolated electron particles?

Note: I refrain from using the concept of handedness and the terms left-handed and right-handed when referring to chirality since these usually refer to the helicity of charged fermions and their ...
user avatar
  • 3,002
0 votes
0 answers
53 views

Drawing Feynman diagram for positronium decay into 2 photons

I am studying the annihilation processes and read that electron-positron annihilation releases 2 photons. I know that releasing 1 photon is not possible because it violates the conservation of $E$. ...
user avatar
  • 1
9 votes
2 answers
710 views

Why is the electron massless before interaction with the Higgs field?

Can't the electron have a mass before electroweak symmetry breaking, which is then just modified by its interaction with the Higgs field, instead of gaining all its mass this way? Apparently other ...
user avatar
  • 428

1
2 3 4 5
60