Questions tagged [electrical-resistance]

The tag applies to electrical resistance and resistors. DO NOT USE THIS TAG for non-electrical resistance.

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10
votes
5answers
19k views

Resistor circuit that isn't parallel or series

What's the equivalent resistance in this circuit (between points A and B)?
8
votes
2answers
6k views

Why is the voltage drop across an ideal wire zero?

I'm having trouble conceptualizing why the voltage drop between two points of an ideal wire (i.e. no resistance) is $0~V$. Using Ohm's Law, the equation is such: $$ V = IR \\ V = I(0~\Omega) \\ V = 0$...
37
votes
15answers
96k views

I don't understand what we really mean by voltage drop

This post is my best effort to seek assistance on a topic which is quite vague to me, so that I am struggling to formulate my questions. I hope that someone will be able to figure out what it is I'm ...
6
votes
5answers
33k views

Current in series resistors and voltage drop in parallel resistors

When we have resistors in series, the current through all the resistors is same and the voltage drop (or simply voltage) at each resistor is different. Question 1: It is fine that voltage drop (...
28
votes
10answers
73k views

Electricity takes the path of least resistance?

Electricity takes the path of least resistance! Is this statement correct? If so, why is it the case? If there are two paths available, and one, for example, has a resistor, why would the current ...
9
votes
1answer
5k views

Why does electrical current start to flow?

What happens microscopically when an electrical current starts to flow? I'd like to understand microscopically what happens in detail when electrons start moving (quasi-classically). Electrons can ...
19
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6answers
8k views

How do electrons “know” to share their voltage between two resistors?

My physics teacher explained the difference between voltage and current using sandwiches. Each person gets a bag full of sandwiches when they pass through the battery. Current = the number of people ...
10
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6answers
21k views

What would be the effective resistance of the ladder of resistors having n steps

I'm a tutor. This is a high school level problem. In high school, every one have might have solved a problem of effective resistance of a ladder of resistors having infinite steps. Now the problem is ...
4
votes
1answer
863 views

Drift velocity in Drude model

this is a very short question, probably I'm missing something really simple: according to Drude model, we have for the drift velocity of electrons, being also the average velocity: $$ v_d = \frac {-e ...
23
votes
5answers
22k views

What's the physical meaning of the imaginary component of impedance?

As you know, impedance is defined as a complex number. Ideal capacitors: $$ \frac {1} {j \omega C} \hspace{0.5 pc} \mathrm{or} \hspace{0.5 pc} \frac {1} {sC} $$ Ideal inductors: $$ j \omega L \...
10
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4answers
4k views

Derivation of Ohm's Law

Is it possible to derive Ohm's law (perhaps in some appropriate limit) from Maxwell's Equations?
1
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1answer
8k views

Current against the inverse of resistance graph, $I = V/R +c$

If I have a plot of current ($y$ axis) against 1/Resistance ($x$ axis). The circuit it is measured from is a simply 2 resistors connected in parallel to battery, where the potential across the ...
1
vote
4answers
1k views

Voltage drop along an idealized resistance-free wire in a circuit?

If you connected the positive terminal of a battery to the negative terminal to a battery with a wire with (hypothetically) no resistance, and are asked to give the voltage drop of a segment of wire ...
30
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6answers
6k views

Could someone intuitively explain to me Ohm's law?

Could someone intuitively explain to me Ohm's law? I understand what voltage is and how it is the electric potential energy and that it is the integral of the electric field strength etc. I also ...
25
votes
2answers
7k views

Resistance between any 2 nodes on an infinite square grid

This question is motivated by this xkcd comic strip . The problem is indeed interesting, and my first recollection upon reading this was a similar problem in the book Problems in General Physics by I....
23
votes
6answers
17k views

How can Ohm's law be correct if superconductors have 0 resistivity?

Ohm's law states that the relationship between current ( I ) voltage ( V ) and resistance ( R ) is $$I = \frac{V}{R}$$ However superconductors cause the resistance of a material to go to zero, and ...
9
votes
3answers
26k views

Which dissipates more power, a small or big resistor?

I was talking to someone about trying to dissipate the most heat from a metal crucible (essentially just a resistor $R$). He argued that you wanted the resistor to have a high resistance because $P=I^...
-1
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5answers
16k views

Determine which circuits are parallel and which are in series

I need to find the Equivalent Resistance across A and B. The problem is, I don't know which one's are in series and which ones are in parallel. How do I identify which ones are parallel or series?
95
votes
2answers
65k views

On this infinite grid of resistors, what's the equivalent resistance?

I searched and couldn't find it on the site, so here it is (quoted to the letter): On this infinite grid of ideal one-ohm resistors, what's the equivalent resistance between the two marked nodes? ...
67
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13answers
14k views

Why doesn't current pass through a resistance if there is another path without resistance?

Why doesn't current pass through a resistance if there is another path without resistance? How does it know there is resistance on that path ?
12
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3answers
12k views

Is it possible to mathematically derive the formula for resistance?

Resistance is given by $\rho L/A$, where $\rho$ is the material constant, $L$ is the length, and $A$ is the area. Is there any way that this can be derived mathematically, or is the only way ...
11
votes
5answers
27k views

Detecting if resistances are parallel or series in complex circuits

I know how to detect when resistors are arranged in parallel or series arrangement and I can also find their equivalent resistance in simple circuits or when resistances are connected in form of ...
16
votes
6answers
72k views

Will current pass without any resistance?

I've learned that a resistor converts some electrical energy into heat energy while the current flows through it and thus causes a power loss, but what if there's not any resistor in a circuit. Will ...
12
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1answer
3k views

Resistance between two points in an infinite metal sphere/cube

Let's imagine that we have a tridimensional metal object of infinite size, and decide to calculate the resistance between two arbitrary points. How would we go about doing this? I have thought of two ...
8
votes
3answers
36k views

Equivalent resistance in ladder circuit [closed]

I have stumbled upon a given question I really have a hard time to solve. Basically I need to find an equivalent resistance in some form of "ladder" configuration. Where the chain is an infinite ...
2
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5answers
2k views

The Difference Between voltage and current

I know that this question has been asked many times before, and I have read over several of the threads asking this question, but they do not include the gripe I have with my problem of understanding ...
1
vote
6answers
5k views

What happens to half of the energy in a circuit with a capacitor?

For a simple circuit with a battery supplying a voltage V to a capacitor, let us assume that the charge on the capacitor is Q. Now, the work done by the battery or the energy supplied is given by the ...
1
vote
5answers
2k views

Why current in series circuit is the same?

I have read in the internet that the charges do not have any other path to go and they must go through the same in a series circuit,hence the current is same. It was quite convincing but what ...
43
votes
3answers
37k views

Why do we use AC for long distance transmission?

Why do we use AC (Alternating Current) for long distance transmission of electrical power? I know that AC is such a current that changes polarity (magnitude and direction) and has fixed poles.
13
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5answers
17k views

How can one derive Ohm's Law? [duplicate]

I am looking for the derivation of Ohm's Law, i.e., $V$ is directly proportional to $I$. Can someone help me with it?
8
votes
3answers
21k views

Proof of Thevenin and Norton theorem

How can I prove Thevenin's and Norton's theorem? Thévenin's theorem can be used to convert any circuit's sources and impedances to a Thévenin equivalent.
6
votes
3answers
1k views

Voltage drop = more electrons on one side of resistor

I have been asking myself this question for a long time now. Suppose we have two resistors in series connected to a voltage source. Simply put, does the voltage drop on each resistor mean that there ...
13
votes
5answers
11k views

Is current in superconductors infinite? If they have 0 resistance then I (V/R) should be infinite? [duplicate]

I learned many years ago that according to Ohm's law, current is equal to voltage divided by resistance. Now if superconductors have zero resistance then the current should be infinite. Moreover the ...
9
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5answers
22k views

If a superconductor has zero resistance, does it have infinite amperage?

If amps = volts / ohms, and ohms is 0, then what is x volts / 0 ohms?
7
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5answers
4k views

Why there is electromagnetic resistivity $\approx 377\Omega$ in vacuum?

I cant understand that. If there isn't a material that makes it hard to pass, why there is a resistivity $\approx 377\Omega$ in vacuum?
4
votes
3answers
7k views

General integral to find resistance

My question is: is there a simple and truly general equation for the resistance between two electrical equipotential surfaces?. Obviously, if so, what is it, and if not, why? It would be very ...
1
vote
1answer
253 views

Differential equation in RL-circuit

I am self-studying electromagnetism right now (by reading University Physics 13th edition) and for some reason I always want to understand things in a crystalclear way and in depth. Now look at this ...
10
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2answers
2k views

Do electrons move around a circuit?

We could imagine a simple electronic circuit composed by a power source and a resistor. It is usual find descriptions as "The moving charged particles in an electric current are called charge ...
3
votes
1answer
10k views

How to find the total current supplied to the circuit?

Recently, I came across a question based on finding electric current of a circuit. Here's the image... I know, by using the formula $I=V/R$, we can easily calculate the current as $V$ is given and $R$...
5
votes
3answers
863 views

Why doesn't current decrease in series combination?

I know that the question is quite stupid but I want to get an insight of this case. consider 3 resistors connected in series with a battery, after the current passes through resistor 1 it loses some ...
4
votes
1answer
91 views

Is thermal dissipation of resistors a thermodynamic necessity of the Ohm I-V relationship?

We know that all resistors dissipate at a rate $I^2 R = V^2 /R$. But I'm wondering if it is possible to prove that a component with a linear relationship between current and voltage ($ I \propto V$) ...
2
votes
5answers
1k views

Ohm's Law Intuition

When we derive Ohm's Law using the Drude Model, we assume at one point of time that $E=V/L$, when is fact, $E=dV/dL$, unless $E$ is constant, in which case the assumption $E=V/L$ is true. But I don't ...
1
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3answers
1k views

Resistors in series vs parallel

I understand that for resistors in series we need to add R for each resistor to get the equivalent resistance, where R is resistance. I also understand the mathematical manipulations that show that ...
0
votes
3answers
107 views

Why is there a sudden change in current between $t=0^{-}$ and $t=0^{+}$ when an active inductor is connected in series with a relaxed inductor?

Let us take the following question as an example: For the above question I drew the corresponding Laplace transform diagram, as follows (didn't draw the switch since it basically open circuit after $...
0
votes
2answers
9k views

Greatest and Least Resistance and Current Characteristics of Parallel vs Series circuits

Which type of circuit would have the greater resistance? Which type would have the greater current? and Why? My book says that parallel has the greater resistance than current as parallel wiring if ...
-2
votes
3answers
30k views

Why current through all the resistors in series is considered to be same? [duplicate]

Consider the circuit shown, where $R_{1} > R_{2}$. I meant to say that resistance offered by the resistor 1 is greater than the resistance offered by the resistor 2. Keep $t$ constant i,e calculate ...
13
votes
6answers
20k views

Why is current the same in a series circuit?

So I am a 10th grade student and my teacher told me that the current is the same at every point in a series circuit. It does split up in parallel circuit but it then recombines and the current flowing ...
17
votes
4answers
12k views

Why does vacuum have a nonzero characteristic impedance towards electromagnetic radiation?

On Wikipedia, the impedance of free space $Z_0$ is defined as square root of the ratio of the permeability of free space $\mu_0$ to the permittivity of free space $\epsilon_0$, i.e. $$Z_0 = \sqrt{\...
10
votes
4answers
8k views

Why does a Resistor cause a potential drop?

I need to know the underlying physics of what exactly happens different with the electric field in the resistor than in superconducting wires. Why is it that when I connect a resistor, potential ...
5
votes
4answers
5k views

How can there be a current and an electric field in an idealized wire with no voltage drop?

In an ideal circuit, How can there be a current b/w points a & b, when there is no potential difference and thus no electric field between a & b? If there is no current, then where does ...