Questions tagged [electric-current]

A measure of the rate at which electric charge is transported (especially through a circuit), it has units of charge/time.

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1answer
191 views

Chemistry of electrical conductivity of pure water

I understand the electrical conductivity of pure water is very low, but not zero, and is due to the slight number of H+ and OH- ions naturally present. I understand that they will move under the ...
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121 views

Photons and Electric Current

I am trying to understand how photons as the force carrier for the electromagnetic force (or field) manifest themselves in a flow of electric charge, i.e. an electric current. Both standard (...
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1answer
127 views

Is electricity perpetual in a superconductor system?

I wonder if electricity consumption happen according to the Law of conservation of energy and Joule effect, in a regular circuit certain amount of energy is transformed into heat by components ...
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2answers
324 views

How to measure transverse current-current correlation at arbitrary wave vector and frequency

Let $\hat J^{\mu}(t,\boldsymbol r) \equiv (c \hat \rho(t,\boldsymbol r), \hat{\boldsymbol J}(t,\boldsymbol r))$ be the density-current operator at spacetime coordinate $(t,\boldsymbol r)$, in the ...
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2answers
1k views

Voltage and Electric Field in a Circuit

I have a doubt regarding how the electric field acts in a circuit. I have been told that a normal cell creates a uniform electric field, but I find it a bit confusing. Let me explain my doubt with a ...
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0answers
245 views

How can the Joule effect be explained quantum mechanically?

When electric current passes through a copper wire, it gets heated, this is the famous Joule effect. The explanation for this is given as follows: Free electrons in the copper wire move very fast and "...
3
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1answer
233 views

Why is lightning going from the Earth to the clouds while the electrons are going from the clouds to the Earth?

The lightning is often a discharge in advance. The (negative) charge slide occasionally a little further on in the conductive channel, wherein said channel is highlighted each time something. The ...
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72 views

Current density defined by the scattering operator

I have a problem with the definition of the current density. In most literature it is defined as $j^\mu=\frac{i}{2}(S^*\frac{\partial S(A)}{\partial A_\mu(x)})$. I understand that normally we use ...
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595 views

Current Density Boundary Conditions and its Implications

According to Ohm's Law, one can say $ \overline{J} =\sigma \overline{E} $ if the field is in a conductor, and $ \overline{J} =0 $ if it's in empty space. Now if we take the surface of a conductor and ...
3
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1answer
369 views

Opacity/transparency of conductive meshes to charged particles (electrons/ions)

When using a conductive (metal) mesh, effectively a metallic woven fabric, in vacuum applications as a "grid" for charged particle optics, how does one calculate (or at least estimate) the opacity or ...
3
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2answers
679 views

Contradicting forces on a circular loop under current in magnetic field?

I have the following general conceptual concern. Think of a thin conducting loop of radius $R$ placed in the $x$-$y$-plane at $z=0$. There is a homogeneous current density $\vec{j}$ running through ...
3
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4answers
968 views

Electromagnetic field and voltage drop in a circuit

I have been thinking for a while about what really causes voltage drop and how to explain it in terms of what the electric and magnetic fields do. So I've been reading a lot of posts here and in other ...
3
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1answer
674 views

Distribution of current of a rotating cone

If I have a hollow cone (surface with no bottom cover ) as the one in the picture. The cone has surface charged density $\sigma$. It rotates around the symmetry axis with an angular velocity $\omega$. ...
3
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1answer
817 views

If we have a current $I$ flowing down a wire, why must the net bound current be zero?

Say we are dealing with a wire that has a current $I$ flowing through it, i.e. $I$ is the free current. Why must it then hold that the net bound current, that is, the bound volume current, $J_b$, and ...
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27 views

Would the voltmeters give different readings in a circuit with induced current?

$\def\vE{{\vec{E}}}$ $\def\vD{{\vec{D}}}$ $\def\vB{{\vec{B}}}$ $\def\vJ{{\vec{J}}}$ $\def\vr{{\vec{r}}}$ $\def\vA{{\vec{A}}}$ $\def\vH{{\vec{H}}}$ $\def\ddt{\frac{d}{dt}}$ $\def\rot{\operatorname{rot}}...
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3answers
92 views

Basic question about electric shock

When we are negatively charged, and we touch a doorknob for example, why does the shock happen (i.e. the flow of charge)? I understand that the electrons want to flow to positive charges, and I know ...
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0answers
28 views

Can an Opposing Current Create another Opposing Current?

In Inductors when current increases it's magnetic field induces a voltage which causes an opposing current that slows down the rise of the current that initially creates it, but can this opposing ...
2
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2answers
67 views

What does 'Oppose a Change in Current' really mean from Lenz Law?

We all know what Lenz Law is, but I have a bit of trouble conceptualizing the phrase above. Does 'Oppose a Change in Current' means it will take more time for the current to increase to its maximum ...
2
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0answers
35 views

Would there be any current if an electric circuit is cooled to absolute zero?

My question is if I got a superconductor and cool it to absolute zero at least measurable by today's tool, it should have no electrical resistance but then would there be any current when there is a ...
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0answers
121 views

Proof that true passive linear memristors don't exist

This is a sequel to the following (now irrelevent) question: My attempt to implement linear memristor Assume the "conceptual symmetry" of the fundamental passive circuit elements holds: Then let's ...
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0answers
47 views

what is the current operator of an interacting electron gas?

If i have an electron gas with coulomb interactions, what would be the current, operator. I would write the Heisenberg equation of motion for the density operator, than write the continuity equation ...
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2answers
632 views

Why does Griffiths's book say that there can be no surface current since this would require an infinite electric field for an incident wave?

In sec. 9.4.2 Griffiths shows the well known boundary conditions for E and B fields, one of them is this: $$\frac{1}{\mu_{1}}\textbf{B}_{1}^{\parallel}-\frac{1}{\mu_{2}}\textbf{B}_{2}^{\parallel}=\...
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1answer
76 views

Maximum practically possible current value for High Frequency Alternating Current in metal conductor

Is it practically possible to reach 1 A current AC in the metal conductor with frequency 2GHz? Or in other words, if I have plain metal wire, or maybe thin tube/foil to reduce skin effect what is the ...
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0answers
68 views

What if in potentiometer, the loops are not balanced to cancel the potential and current flows?

As described in the book (image) that loops should be balanced with equal potential with help of the galvanometer. What if the we do not balance it to zero and have some current flowing? Can we still ...
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0answers
706 views

Electric field due to a current carrying loop

I want to know how I can calculate the radiated electric field in the far zone of the loop. Knowing that the loop is in center at the origin of a x-y plane Knowing that the loop as a time-harmonic ...
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0answers
157 views

What is the general proof that the torque acting on an irregular current carrying loop in an uniform magnetic field is only dependent on area?

How do you prove that the torque acting on an irregular current carrying loop in an uniform magnetic field in the plane of loop = $I \vec{A} \times \vec{B}$ Where, $ \vec{A}$ = Area vector of the ...
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0answers
107 views

Is the current density ${\bf j}$ an observable?

The current density ${\bf j}$ is most easily defined from$$ I = \int_{\text{cross-section} \atop \text{of wire}} \textbf{j}\cdot d\textbf{S}, $$ where $I$ is the current flowing through the wire. From ...
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1answer
97 views

Electron Flow Notion

I would like to ask something that bothers me. A lot of us know of the electron flow notion, which it is the technical representation of how the electron charge really flows, starting from the ...
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1answer
120 views

Would a solenoid move if a magnet went through it?

If you were to have a solenoid (0 current) floating still in space, and shot a magnet through it, would the solenoid move, or would it only create a DC current (what if it has a closed/open circuit)? ...
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0answers
87 views

Ampere's law, do I include the electric field causing the current?

Let's say I have a long, straight wire with a time varying current, $I$ through it. Now if I take a circular Amperian path around this loop wire (and concentric with it) there is both a current $I$ ...
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0answers
112 views

Strength of Magnet in Magnetic Bearings

While reading about magnetic bearings, one reads about passive/active magnetic bearings. By passive, one means no electric current is put into the bearing for attaining magnetic levitation/flux. In ...
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342 views

Magnetic flux density a small distance off axis from a current loop

I'm currently studying physics at University and struggling with the problem mentioned, it's on a past paper I'm trying to do. I have calculated the B field on axis as (sorry don't know how to format ...
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586 views

The anapole moment, derivation from Dirac current density

Basically I am looking for a way to expand the electromagnetic interaction energy $W = A_{\mu}j^{\mu}$ (both $A$ and $j$ obtained from the Dirac equation) similar to the classical expansion in ...
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89 views

sensitive scale & resistance of analog current meter

Does the resistance of an analog current meter increase or decrease when it is set to a more sensitive scale (lower range)?
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719 views

Drift velocity of electrons in a superconducting loop

Do electrons travel at the Fermi velocity in a superconducting loop? For metals the Fermi velocity seems to be around $10^6$ m/s. So would electrons (in a Cooper pair) travel around the loop at this ...
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0answers
304 views

current density in 1-d

I have a slight problem with the notion of the current density in one dimension. For example the probability current in 1-d given by: $J(x) = -\frac{1}{m} Im(-i\psi^*\partial_x \psi)$ calculation the ...
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0answers
1k views

Relationship between current, voltage, magnetic field in a torus

I'm trying to find the relation between current density $\boldsymbol{j}$, voltage $v$, and magnetic field $\boldsymbol{B}$ for the time-harmonic approximation in a cylindrically-symmetric coil (a ...
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0answers
88 views

Current between supeconducting rings

How to calculate the current between two superconducting rings with radius r separated by a distance d? Please note that being unfamiliar to the concept of superconducting rings, I can't approach ...
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2answers
1k views

Effect of Current on spring

When Current passes thru a spring , some books mention that it gets compressed. However, I think due to the heating effect of current, molecules will increase kinetic energy and the spring should get ...
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0answers
132 views

How much current would be generated by polarity reversal of Earth's magnetic field?

Continuing from my previous question Is reversal of magnetic polarity in a planet an instantaneous occurence? A change in magnetic flux is expected to generate an EMF. In the case where the ...
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1answer
180 views

At what distance is lightning dangerous for someone lying down?

My 8 yo child told me that they learned at school that they should lay down flat on the ground in case of lightning. I told him that the more correct position is crouching down with feet together, but ...
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1answer
560 views

Would there be EMF induced in our body due to electromagnetic radiations?

The experiments of innovative Faraday and Joseph Henry in USA, conducted around 1830, demonstrated conclusively that electric currents were induced in closed coils when subjected to changing magnetic ...
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2answers
120 views

Does current flow when you connect a battery to earth?

Let's say that the earth has 0V and everything is ideal, does current still flow and why?
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3answers
59 views

Why voltage is same across parallel resistance?

Since voltage stands for energy per unit charge to be used to carry it from one point to another,why should energy per unit charge be same for two resistors of different resistances,?the energy ...
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0answers
30 views

A steady line current moving at a steady velocity can produce non-transverse electric fields. What about moving line charges?

A steady, straight current that is stationary can exert a Lorentz force on a moving charge that is parallel to that current. Conversely, a stationary charge can experience a Lorentz force that is "...
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37 views

All the electric fans in my apartment have started simultaneously producing a high frequency sound. Why?

I woke up last night hearing an odd high pitched noise that I am not used to. I usually keep a few fans running because I have a train that runs nearby and the white noise blocks it out. I tried ...
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1answer
19 views

Relationship between concentration and resistance of aqueous solutions

I'm a senior physics/chemistry student working on a practical assignment where I am trying to identify the resistance of CuSO4 in solution (distilled water). I have recorded my data and determined it ...
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1answer
58 views

Classical Explanation for Electron-Ion collisions

Classically, electrons collide with other electrons and massive (by comparison), stationary positive ions as they conduct down a wire when an electric field is applied. Is there a good mechanism ...
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1answer
51 views

Divergence of current density and electric field within a wire

In the following exercise: I concern myself with the validity of my interpretations of (b). Here I am more confident slightly. The divergence of the current density is merely $- d \rho / dt$, so as ...
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0answers
87 views

About device in which potential drops in direction opposite to current

A small intro: We have mainly three types of electronic-devices with their characteristic property: Resistor with Resistance($R$) Capacitor with Inverse of Capacitance($1 \over C$) ...