Questions tagged [covariance]

How a quantity behaves under a change of basis vectors. This tag covers relativistic covariance, as well as contravariant and covariant tensors not necessarily in the context of relativity. DO NOT USE THIS TAG for statistical covariance.

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133 views

Can cut-off regularisation cause a Poincaré anomaly?

Momentum cut-off regularisation leads to non-covariant results, i.e., it breaks the Poincaré covariance of the theory. Is there any guarantee that Poincaré covariance is always restored when we remove ...
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364 views

Is classical electromagnetism conformally invariant? (and a bit of general covariance)

The contest is a flat $4d$ Minkowsky space. A conformal transformation is a diffeomorphism $\tilde x(x)$ such that the metric transforms as \begin{equation*} \tilde g_{\tilde \mu \tilde \nu} = w^2(x) ...
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1answer
117 views

Parametric and covariant expressions for the acceleration vector

I am reading S. Neil Rasband book about Classical Dynamics. In the first chapter, there are two different forms of the acceleration: What he calls the "intrinsic". Given a trajectory with parameter $...
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55 views

Variations of tensors are tensors?

Recently I posted a question about variation of metric. I thought I understood it and talked with my friend about it. After that he said he's not convinced because he can't prove variation of metric ...
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84 views

Showing path integral formalism is Lorentz-invariant without resorting to Hamiltonian formalism

I think people typically say that path integral formalism is manifestly Lorentz-invariant, because Lagrangian density is Lorentz-invariant. However, path formalism is typically defined with time ...
3
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2answers
141 views

State amplitude and field operator covariance in QFT

I'm studying QFT on Bogoliubov-Shirkov's "Introduction to the theory of quantized fields" (3d edition). In $§9.3$ they discuss transformation properties of quantum states and operators in QFT. Given ...
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664 views

“Hypersurface orthogonal” component of covariant derivative of normal vector

I believe that answer to my question is rather trivial but I can't seem to get my head around it. In the context of the ADM formulation of gravity (or any other differential geometry context, I guess) ...
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172 views

Is a solution to the Klein-Gordon equation homeomorphic (or even diffeomorphic) to a solution of an equation with a different covariance group?

Consider some solution $\psi(x,t)$ to the linear Klein-Gordon equation: $-\partial^2_t \psi + \nabla^2 \psi = m^2 \psi$. Up to homeomorphism, can $\psi$ serve as a solution to some other equation ...
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327 views

composition of space expansion and movement as a gauge invariance

suppose i have a space-time where we have one point-like object* which we will call movement space probe or $\mathbf{M}_{A}$ for short, and it will be moving with constant velocity $V^A_{\mu}$ in ...
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1answer
66 views

How to determine if a tensor is covariant or contravariant?

In special relativity, the coordenates of a event are in general written using a 4-vector: $$x^{\mu} = \binom{ct}{\textbf{x}}$$ where $\textbf{x} = (x,y,z)$ are the spacial coordenates. This is a ...
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62 views

Re-Writing the Dirac Equation in True Covariant Form

This is a rather brief inquiry, but to get to the point it's always frustrated me that in non-relativistic and relativistic quantum mechanics spin matrices are written as a "vector of matrices" ...
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56 views

Derivatives in Poincare' gauge theory

I have been reading the lectures: http://www.damtp.cam.ac.uk/research/gr/members/gibbons/gwgPartIII_Supergravity.pdf about Poincare' gauge theory. The Poincare' group is considered as semidirect ...
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74 views

Stuck on Weinberg's quick derivation of Thomas precession

In Weinberg's Gravitation and Cosmology he has a pretty concise derivation of the Thomas precession formula (Eq. 5.1.13). But I don't get the first step... A particle with intrinsic spin is under the ...
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63 views

Commutator relation of EM Field Covariant?

I read that for quantization of the EM-Field, you demand the canonical equal-time commutation relations: $$[A^\mu(\vec{x},t), \pi^\nu(\vec{y},t)] = i \hbar g^{\mu \nu} \delta^3(\vec{x} - \vec{y}). $$ ...
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340 views

Notation for vectors and covectors

This is probably a very simple question, and I think I know the answer, but I cannot find a place to solidly confirm this. So if I want to write a vector $\mathbf{V}$ in terms of its contravariant (...
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65 views

Where is a proof that string field theory is generally covariant?

Given a space-time coordinate of a string $X^\mu(\sigma)$ dependent on the position $\sigma$ around the string. And a string field functional $\Phi[X]$, is there a proof that the equations of motion (...
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107 views

Covariant quantization of an interacting relativistic particle

A method of covariant quantization for a free relativistic particle appears in the first part of some introductory string theory texts (Tong, Zwiebach,...). None of them (as far as I hae seen) give an ...
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1answer
178 views

Identifying Lorentz Covariant Equations

Statement: $\phi , A^{\mu}, T^{\mu \nu}$ are a Lorentz scalar, vector, and tensor. Which of the following equations are Lorentz covariant. a. $\phi = A_{0}$ b. $\phi = A^{\mu}A_{\mu}$ c. $\phi = ...
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52 views

Is there a general procedure for covariantizing equations?

I am currently attempting to derive covariant forms of equations whose domains are D=3 space. I am considering Lorentzian $(\mathbb{R}^4, \Omega, x, \nabla)$, where $\Omega \subset\mathbb{R}^4$ has a ...
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171 views

Background subtraction for a signal ans Errors Analysis

I use a CCD to see the split of a energy level due to Zeeman effect. I have a 1 dimensional CCD of 7926 pixel of 7μm each one. My CCD analyze a region 2 dimensional, and then it steps forward 200 ...
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134 views

quadripolar moment in curved space

So, i'm going over the Thorne's derivation of the quadrupolar radiation term, and they write the core term as: $$ \frac{3 r_i r_j - 2 r^2 \delta_{ij}}{4 r^5} $$ But if i try to obtain this term by ...
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29 views

What's the covariant derivative of a normalized, timelike Killing vector?

I'm reading The large scale structure of spacetime and in page 72 the author says: A static metric admits a timelike killing vector $K$. We define the timelike unit vector $V$ as $V=K/f$, where $f^...
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1answer
54 views

Is there any meaning of tensor contraction?

Is there any meaning behind tensor contraction. Or is it just randomly getting rid of some components by only selecting those with same index and sum them up? For example, I know tensor is ...
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56 views

General covariance and a running cosmological constant

A running cosmological constant $\Lambda(t)$ can always be included in the perfect fluid source tensor. By the transformation properties of tensors Einstein's field equation is still independent of ...
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69 views

Transformation of ADM parameters under diffeomorphisms

I am trying to prove the invariance of the ADM formalism under (infinitesimal) diffeomorphisms. I have checked Wald and other textbooks on the subject but have been unable to find expressions for how ...
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26 views

Help with the proof of the independence of the form of Lagrange equation wrt. choice of coordinates

I am reading about Lagrange-Euler equation here. When they prove that the formula is independent of the choice of coordinate, there is this reasoning, but I could not understand (probably my calculus ...
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110 views

Covariant version of the Coulomb gauge

In curved spacetime, it is possible to define the covariant version of the Lorenz gauge, going from $\partial_\mu A^\mu =0$ to $\nabla _\mu A^\mu =0$ in some curved spacetime $g_{\mu \nu}$. What is ...
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130 views

What is the mathematical formulation of the universality of physics in spacetime?

Consider a general spacetime manifold $\mathcal{M}$ of a given dimension (usually $D = 4$). I call two physical constraints that should be imposed on any reasonable classical theory of physics : ...
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1answer
105 views

Expanding a summation of covariant derivatives

I hope this is not a silly question but I am trying to understand how this part of the equation works: $$ \nabla_{\lambda} \left( \nabla_{\mu}(R_{\nu \lambda}) + \nabla_{\nu}(R_{\mu \lambda}) \right) ...
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135 views

Partial derivatives of Wilson like integrals

I have a one-form field on Euclidean space. Suppose we integrate it over a loop around the specific point $x$. $$I(x)=\int_xU.$$ I want to calculate the partial derivatives of this integral respect to ...
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2answers
172 views

What does it mean to go from a co-variant vector to a contravariant vector?

In most presentations of general-relativity I see the following statement, We can change from a covariant vector to a contravariant vector by using the metric as follows, ${ A }^{ \mu }={ g }^{ \...
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2answers
194 views

Lorentz force in curved spacetime

I am trying to derive the equation for Lorentz force mentioned in the following Wikipedia article - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Maxwell%27s_equations_in_curved_spacetime viz., $$ \frac{d p_{\alpha}...
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1answer
140 views

Inverting Operators, and Propagators on Curved Spacetime

I am a bit confused about inverting operators, and calculating propagators on a curved spacetime. Consider the following example: If I have a Lagrangian for a charged scalar field on a curved ...
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308 views

Is potential energy a scalar operator?

If a scalar operator $\hat{S}$ is defined as an operator that is invariant under rotations, i.e $$U^\dagger S U = S,\,\,\,\,\,\,\, U=e^{-i\theta\hat{\mathbf{J}}\cdot{\mathbf{n}}}$$ which is ...
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144 views

General relativity: Proof of Lorentz transformation validity for Linearized gravity

Wikipedia says that Lorentz transformation is only correct for inertial coordinates. However, I was flipping though Gravitation by Misner et al. On page 439, it says that for linearized gravity $$ \...
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1answer
149 views

How to prove $\nabla\vec{V}$ is a tensor without transformation properties?

In A First Course in General Relativity, Schutz asks the reader to prove that $\nabla \vec{V}$ is a $(1,1)$-tensor, where $$(\nabla\vec{V})^\alpha_{\ \ \ \ \beta} \equiv V^\alpha_{\ \ \ \ ;\beta} \...
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115 views

What are the fields in a classical field theory?

Consider scalar Yukawa theory. The Lagrangian density $\mathcal{L}$ contains an interaction term $$\mathcal{L}_I=g\psi^*\psi\phi$$ where $\psi$ and $\phi$ are complex and real scalars respectively. ...
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65 views

Is energy-momentum of curvature a boundary/holographic density?

Since the beginnings of General Relativity, we have had this awkward, unholy separation of the universe in marble versus wood. divergence of the stress-energy momentum holds at all points of space-...
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30 views

Christoffel symbols in general coordinates

In order to understand the meaning of covariant derivative, I have seen the following argument. Let us consider a covariant vector $V_\mu$. We would like to understand whether $$T_{\mu\nu} = \frac{\...
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25 views

Do gauge fields not transform like functions of the coordinates under translations?

By "transform like a function of the coordinates," I mean that under an infinitesimal translation $x^\mu \to x^\mu + \epsilon^\mu$, to first order in $\epsilon^\mu$ the function $f(t,\mathbf x)$ ...
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62 views

Is the Minkowski metric coordinate independent?

Suppose I have some vector $\mathbf{P} = p^{\mu} e_{\mu}$. Now, for a flat spacetime, the contravariant components can be lowered via the Minkowski metric, $$ p_{\mu} = \eta_{\mu \nu} p^{\nu}.$$ My ...
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40 views

Covariant derivative with respect to commutator

I have some confusion with the notion of $\nabla_{[A, B]}\bf{v}$, that expression, with a commutator of vector fields as the subindex of the connection appears for instance in the definition of the ...
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19 views

Signal-to-noise (SNR) in a quantum network

I'm studying dynamics of a quantum network of coupled oscillators driven by an external force. Am I doing right, if I calculate signal-to-noise ratio by dividing the expectation value of oscillator ...
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27 views

Transformation of $g^{\mu\nu}\partial_\mu f \partial_\nu f$

I have the expression $$g^{\mu\nu}\partial_\mu f \partial_\nu f$$ e.g. inside a Lagrange density, where $g$ is a metric tensor and I want to transform this expression to a new set of coordinates. Do ...
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33 views

Generally Covariant Dirac equation: The spin connection

Wikipedia, an answer on stackexchange and a few papers in the Arxiv I've found all have different definitions of the spin connection found in the Dirac equation. Can anyone please tell me what the ...
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41 views

Derivation of Covariant derivative for fermionic fields

I've been reading about the Dirac equation in curved spacetime and understand the nature of the verbien, but am wondering what the relationship is between the two definitions of the Fermionic ...
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38 views

Covariance of applying a four-force to a stress-energy tensor with forward Euler

I've run into a great deal of confusion on what I expected to be a very simple issue of covariance. I have an equation $$T^{\mu\nu}_{~~~~;\mu} = -G^{\nu}.$$ This is manifestly covariant; so far so ...
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1answer
54 views

What are some of the reasons for raising/lowering indices of a tensor?

In Dirac's paper: Classical theory of radiating electrons, he decides to raise and lower the indices on the same object multiple times: \begin{align*} \frac{\partial{A_{\mu}}}{\partial{x_{\mu}}} &...
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1answer
46 views

Using diagonality in Einstein notation

Given a diagonal matrix $D$, with diagonal elements given by vector $\mathbf{d}$. Representing this in Einstein notation gives $$ D_{ij} = \delta_{ijk} d_k $$ where $$ \delta_{ijk} = \begin{cases}...
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1answer
159 views

General Covariance, what does Einstein mean?

I have read the papers by Einstein and I am convinced I understand what he means completely. Given there are controversies, maybe I over understood it: It is I am convinced, can be said in two ...