Questions tagged [conductors]

For questions about materials which allow the flow of an electric charge (electrical conductors) or the transfer of heat (thermal conductors) through them.

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30 views

$E$ in a solid uniformly charged conductor: Is my reasoning here correct?

Suppose we take spherical conductor which is having both positive and negative charges but as a whole is electrically uncharged and is not under the influence of any external Electric field, We can ...
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89 views

Is resistance determined by electron mobility?

How Is resistance determined by electron mobility for a given resistor or wire.
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1answer
28 views

Potential due to initially uncharged induced conductor?

From Griffiths' Introduction to electrodynamics: In this problem, Griffiths says that we will set the potential inside and on the surface of the conductor to be zero since its an equipotential ...
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1answer
33 views

How does charge movement vary between insulators and conductors?

I've been reading A Student's Guide to Maxwell's Equations by Daniel Fleisch, and he states: in nonconducting materials (called "insulators" or "dielectrics"), charge does not move freely, but may ...
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1answer
101 views

Does electric field vary with cross sectional area in a non uniform current carrying conductor?

Suoppose I have a non uniform conductor which is kept in a uniform electric field maintaining a constant potential difference across its ends.Both electric field and current density are a properties ...
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5answers
233 views

Which type of conductors don't follow Ohm's law? [closed]

Which type of conductors don't follow Ohm's law? I know that semiconductors and superconductors don't follow them, but why? And what about ideal conductors. What are they? Do they follow ohm's law? ...
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63 views

How to find the charge distribution of a conducting disc?

Generally,Poisson's equation can be solved with appropriate boundary conditions to get potential from which the surface charge densities can be obtained. Most textbooks on Classical electrodynamics ...
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2answers
52 views

Discrepancy in capacitor

Let a capacitor be connected to a battery in a circuit. The battery does work worth $CV^2$ but the capacitor stores only half that amount... We say the other half went away as heat, but how do we ...
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0answers
33 views

Conductance Charged Box

A box with thick and conductive sides with dimensions: Lx, Ly, Lz- while LZ>>Lx,Ly. The long dimension of the box [Lz] can be viewed as infinite so Phi(x,y,z)=Phi(x,y) Given that: Phi(0,y)=-Phi(Lx,...
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Negative real part AC conductivity

I am reading this paper, where the authors are calculating the frequency dependence of the chiral magnetic effect, i.e., ${\bf J} = \sigma^{\text{CME}}(\omega) {\bf B}$. The authors find, see for ...
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1answer
57 views

How do surfaces charges accumulate?

When a voltage source is applied across an ideal wire, do the push of electric field of battery source causes the accumulation of charges on the surface of wire or the capacitance of wire causes it? ...
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1answer
53 views

Why charges should go to the surface of conductor? [duplicate]

How can we show that charges should go to the surface of a conductor, assuming that system should minimize its energy? (With no additional assumptions and maybe using variation method!)
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2answers
81 views

Why do electrons accumulate on the surface of a wire (along its length) when a voltage source is applied across the wire cross section?

When I was going through how electric fields are transmitted long distances through a wire, I read that there was accumulation of charges along the surface of the conductor to drive the fields to long ...
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2answers
145 views

Electric field inside and outside a hollow spherical shell

If a charge(+q) is placed at distance away from a hollow spherical conducting shell , would the net electric field inside the hollow portion remain zero? If the +q charge was placed anywhere inside ...
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0answers
37 views

Doubts on conductor and insulator

I read on Stephen Gray's discovery of conductor and insulator. From that I came across a question that how cork, wood, rope can act as conductor being an insulator but then I got the answer that it is ...
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2answers
128 views

Why doesn't shell theorem work here?

I think I have a misunderstanding about the shell theorem regarding electrostatics here. Since we have a conducting spherical shell, and we are looking for the $E$ field, shouldn't it be 0 within ...
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1answer
142 views

Why Electrical conductivity tensor is symmetric? Or is it not always symmetric?

How to show that the electrical conductivity tensor is symmetric? (or it's not always symmetric?)
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2answers
31 views

Equipotentiality of the conductor surface with extra charges sprinkled and Poisson's equation

The electrostatic potential $\phi(x,y,z)$ everywhere on the surface of a conductor/metal is the same. For a quick reference see this post. Hence, any derivative of $\phi(x,y,z)$ must be zero on the ...
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2answers
37 views

Is it possible to use Ampere's law to calculate vector B around short straight line conductor?

Maybe this question sounds easy, but I would really be grateful if someone could give me an explanation if it's true or not. I'm not sure if I understand it good enough.
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1answer
20 views

Confusion in least action in the following situation

I understand that when electric field is applied normal to the surface of a conductor the net electric field inside the conductor is zero. But as shown in the diagram above, if electric field is not ...
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1answer
115 views

Why can't free electron flow in water to conduct electricity?

This question is related to how batteries work. In a battery, the electrons can only flow in conductors, because they can't flow in the solution. my own thoughts on the matter: I believe it is ...
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3answers
154 views

How to show that the electrons responsible for a current have an energy within $k_BT$ of the Fermi energy?

It is commonly written in textbooks that in metals the electrons responsible for an electric current are the ones that have an energy about $E_F$ and a few $k_BT$ around that energy. See for example ...
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1answer
31 views

Is electric force constant all over the surface of a conductor?

This question was asked in IIT JEE 2010. I know that the electrostatic pressure is equal to (1/2)∈(E)² and if we multiply this with the projected area then we would get the force acting on an object ...
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1answer
50 views

Why should there be electrostatic equilibrium inside a conductor? [duplicate]

I have been trying to understand why the net electric field inside a conductor is zero regardless of the exterbal electric field. But why should equilibrium ever be attained?
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2answers
87 views

Hydrogen: Whether it's a metal or non-metal

I know hydrogen is a non metal, but when I just study about some introductory elementary band theory I find the band structure of hydrogen has a half filled valence band just like alkali metals, and ...
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23 views

Induced charges in Electrostatics

How to find the distribution of induced charge on conductor kept in a uniform electric field? Is there a particular method to do the same?
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1answer
83 views

Non-Hermitian Hamiltonian for electron conductance in electric field?

Electron conductance in a solid state is usually driven by electric field - making some direction of jumps more likely. It makes (e.g. Hubbard's) Hamiltonian no longer self-adjoint, how to simulate ...
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2answers
98 views

When to use Poisson's equation in electrostatics

When does when elect to use Laplace's equation when dealing with charge distributions. For example, if I had a metallic sphere of radius $R$ and charge $Q$, then $$\mathbf E = \begin{cases} 0, & ...
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3answers
61 views

Thermal Energy in a Conductor

We know that thermal energy developed in a current-carrying resistor is given by $U=I^2Rt$ and also $U=VIt$. So my question is- Should we say that $U$ is proportional to $I$ or $I^2$
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2answers
47 views

Electric Fields 'passing' through conductor material

I've been reading Chapter 3.2 and 3.3 of Purcell's Electricity and Magnetism, 3rd ed, and found that I don't really understand a few ideas that Purcell makes about electric fields and conducting ...
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1answer
53 views

Gauss law electric field inside a conductor [closed]

Can you mathematically prove that if there is a cavity in a conductor and no charge is placed in it, the field at all points in the cavity will be zero?
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Prove: “If a cavity surrounded by conducting material is itself empty of charge, then the field within the cavity is zero.” [closed]

Prove: "If a cavity surrounded by conducting material is itself empty of charge, then the field within the cavity is zero." My attempt: Take a Gaussian surface that lies completely inside the cavity....
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3answers
105 views

Charge density on inner surface of conducting shell

The following exercise has brought to my mind something that confuses me: Here, I don't see why there isn't positive charge residing on the inner surface of the conductor at $r=a$. The way I see it,...
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1answer
66 views

When can charge reside on the inner surface of a conductor?

My confusion stems from the following exercise: I've written sloppily: "Why are charges not induced on at least that portion of the inner surface?". As I ask, I don't see how the charge density on ...
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2answers
105 views

Is the electric field within a cavity of a conductor affected only by other charges within the cavity?

The following exercise below confuses me: I don't understand why the answer is (A). I seem to be realizing empirically that the electric field at points inside a cavity in a conductor such as this is ...
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1answer
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Plane of charge versus plane of charge on surface of conductor

The exercise below aiming to test my understanding has me confused: Why is the answer $(B)$? To me, I can envision for infinite planes of charge that its electric field lines are leaving normal to ...
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0answers
28 views

On the Electric Field of conductor under Electrostatic Conditions

Let us take a hollow conductor which has a charge Q uniformly distributed on its surface. Now, we know that the Electric field inside the conductor must be ZERO. But what happens when I bring ...
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1answer
28 views

How does charge develop inside a spherical shell (with non-negligible thickness)?

I read that if there were a charge $+q \ $ kept inside a spherical conducting shell of thickness $t$, a charge of $-q \ $ would develop on the inner surface of the shell. Not more, not less. Why is ...
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2answers
244 views

Why Electric field inside the spherical shell is zero? [duplicate]

electric field in and out of the spherical shell Why the field inside the conducting spherical shell is zero? Professor Lewin said and I quote," there is NO charge inside the conductor because any ...
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2answers
290 views

Why does electrostatic potential inside a conducting spherical shell seem to violate superposition principle?

I want to find the potential at the centre of a conducting spherical shell; The conducting shell bears a total charge of $Q$. The shell has a radius $R$, and there is a point charge of magnitude $q$ ...
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2answers
68 views

Why do 2 charged conductors gain same potential when connected via wire

Why do 2 charged conductors gain same potential when they are connected via a wire.Can somebody also give a mathematical proof of it?
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1answer
245 views

Point charge inside a hollow conductor, does the exterior field changes when the charge moves?

Suppose that I have a hollow conductor with no specific format. I know that if I put a charge inside it, it will induce charge in the inner surface and on the outer surface a charge with a opposite ...
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0answers
51 views

Is this a valid explanation for why charges in a conductor move to the outer surface?

This is a drawing of a spherical conductor with a hollow center. The black dots represent +ive charges, and the arrows represent their electric fields. I am assuming the black dots start on the inner ...
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0answers
25 views

Low energy electrons occupy holes

In Tipler's Physics it is said that for a temperature $T>0$ the only electrons that can gain energy from collisions are the ones with initial energy greater than $E_F-K_BT$. I understand that, ...
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1answer
81 views

How can electrons travel from the valence band into the conduction band?

I'm currently studying Introductory Semiconductor Device Physics by Parker. In band-theory, we know that if an electron is at the top of an energy band, then there are no allowed states immediately ...
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1answer
254 views

Neutral conductor and charged insulator brought near each other

What happens when a charged insulator is placed near an uncharged neutral metallic conductor? I know it attracts each other because of charging by induction (electrons redistribute). But would the ...
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0answers
24 views

Relation between potential and charge of a group of conductors

studying electrodynamics I encountered a few weeks ago this statement regarding a set of conductors in space with no free charges: I could not find an explicit proof of this in any book and I did not ...
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1answer
31 views

Does a conductor actively lose charge during electrical breakdown?

Electrical breakdown occurs when the potential difference between a conductor and the medium surrounding exceeds the breakdown voltage. In such scenario, the electric field at a boundary point is ...
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1answer
121 views

How can the surface of a conducting shell be equipotential when a charge is introduced inside the cavity?

Here is the confusion. Take a spherical conducting shell of a certain thickness. When a postive charge is introduced into the shell the inside surface collects negative charges and the outter ...
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100 views

Why is the electric field between two conducting parallel plates not double what it actually is? [duplicate]

According to here: http://hyperphysics.phy-astr.gsu.edu/hbase/electric/elesht.html We can treat two parallel plates as being a single conductor which has an electric field of $\frac{\sigma}{\...