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1answer
54 views

Is diamond able to conduct electricity given 5.5 eV of energy? How do we then identify insulators and semiconductors?

I have learnt that the band gap for diamond, an insulator, is $5.5\:\rm eV$. Does this mean that diamond is able to conduct electricity if we give it this immense amount of energy (let's assume we do ...
1
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0answers
10 views

Effect of humidity on removing excess charge from objects [duplicate]

The usual answer to the question "why electrostatic discharge happens more often on dry days" is that water - due to its polarity - has the tendency to remove the excess charge. But I do not ...
0
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1answer
26 views

Ways to generate long-lasting charge on materials surface?

First off, I am no physicist, please don't judge me if I said something wrong. I read that insulator surface can carry a static charge by rubbing against another insulator with a different electron ...
1
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1answer
542 views

How do insulators lose their charge?

Some theoretical questions that got me confused during physics lecture today. bringing a conducting balloon to a negatively charged rod close will allow the conducting balloon have positive charges ...
0
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1answer
270 views

Why don't insulators attract even if charged?

I understand that/ obviously, opposite charges will attract? However, I am still slightly confused about what happens if an insulator becomes charged. How come an insulator, which is charged, will ...
1
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0answers
219 views

Why aren't all insulators transparent, since they have a large band gap?

According to Floris' answer in this link, diamonds are transparent as they have large band gaps while graphite is black as it is a conductor. As electrical insulators generally have a large band gap, ...
1
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0answers
1k views

How do excess charges move in an insulator?

I am currently studying intro into electrostatics and reading my notes from teacher that stated, "an insulator holds on tightly to its outer electrons and does not permit the flow of electric charges ...
0
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1answer
99 views

Will a charge ballon get attracted to a conductor or insulator?

Will a inflated ballon charged by rubbing with fur get attracted to a conductor or an insulator ?
2
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1answer
809 views

Charging by friction

Why does charging by friction charges an insulating material even if an insulator does not allow flow of electrons between an object to another? Is it because of the TriboElectric effect but doesn't ...
1
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1answer
222 views

Interaction of charged particles with a conducting or insulating surface

If I have a charged particle floating in a vacuum, and it strikes a conductor or insulator on its way, what would happen? Would the electron be taken into the conductor? or would it just bounce off ...
1
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2answers
760 views

Charged body in hollow conductor : what is the role of insulators and how does the charge distribution change if insulators vs conductors are used?

Question as written in textbook: "Figure 1 illustrates a nested arrangement of four cylindrical conductors (seen side-on in cross-section) in which the cylinders are separated by electrical insulators....
1
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2answers
1k views

Why can an insulator send charges to a conductor via conduction, and not upon an insulator via conduction?

Suppose we have an ebonite rod (insulator). This rod has a negative charge, and once it touches a neutral pith ball, charges are distributed amongst the pith ball. However, why doesn't the same happen ...
0
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1answer
431 views

Is an EMF more/same/less in an insulator than in a conductor?

Is an EMF (electromotive force) more/same/less in an insulator than in a conductor? For example: A loop of copper and a loop of plastic in a changing magnetic field. In which will the emf be the ...
13
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3answers
4k views

What is it about the “conduction band” of a material that is distinct from the valence band?

I'm taking a course in nanotech and we're discussing nanoelectronics. This has led to a discussion of conductors, semiconductors, and insulators. I have a number of lovely diagrams explaining the fact ...
2
votes
1answer
295 views

Semiconductors, Solid-State Physics

We know, that conductors, conduct because their valence energy band is "half" full, and k ("wave vector") can increase and therefore the electrons under the influence of a electric field can "move", ...
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2answers
886 views

Movement of electrons in conductors and insulators

In conductors, the electrons can easily move unlike in insulators that prevent them from moving. What properties in conductors and insulators make them act in such way? Is it related to the position ...
3
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4answers
1k views

Are insulators non-ohmic conductors?

Can insulators/ dielectrics be considered as non-ohmic conductors ? As they apparently breakdown when sufficiently large potential differences are applied across them.
1
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1answer
189 views

Is it possible for a conductor initially, not to have a charge?

Well I'm confused. The thing that was implanted to me is that when I hear about conductors, some charge is present and it can move freely. Now what I want to know is that is it possible for a ...
1
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2answers
750 views

Why do we get electric shocks when most structures are insulators?

Suppose I was standing in the sea, and touched an electric fence; I would receive an electric shock, because both my body and the sea are conductors, and create a path for the electricity to flow. The ...
0
votes
1answer
296 views

Will charge transfer without friction

I know rubbing two objects of different materials together will result in a negative charge on whichever material has a higher electron affinity. However, I was wondering if a negatively charged ...
1
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2answers
544 views

Can the Fermi energy lie into the band gap?

Fermi energy $\rightarrow$ highest energy level filled at $T=0K$ Fermi level $\rightarrow$ Energy level where we have a chance of $50\%$ to find an electron. Now in my course text they say that for ...