Questions tagged [capillary-action]

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Capillary action strength questions

I've been studying capillary action, and I've drawn some conclusions about the behavior which surprised me, and I want to know if I'm understanding it correctly. According to Jurin's law, the height ...
David Davidson's user avatar
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Capillary action of water in a sealed vessel

Consider a vessel completely filled with water and a vertically oriented capillary. If the water vessel was open at the top, you would expect capillary action to occur, lowering the water level in the ...
Luzifer Gatsby's user avatar
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Same needle shows Hydrophobic and hydrophilic behaviour just by changing orientation or position (from surface to bulk)

If I penetrate water's surface with needle (using hand) then Cohesive forces> Adhesive forces and water molecules climb up the needle (exactly like capillary action) and needle behaves ...
Faraz Ahmed's user avatar
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Shape of a static capillary surface

I am studying the effects of surface tension and in particular the shape of a capillary interface in hydrostatic condition. Let's recall the Young-Laplace Equation $ \Delta P = \sigma \bigg(\frac{1}{...
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How do I find the capillary energy of a wetted/dry ping pong ball?

I'm new to capillary forces and I found this statement: I found Jurin's law or the Young-Laplace equation, but it's always about capillary tube and I would know how to find this expression. Regards
Dlouna.J's user avatar
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Capillary action for isotope separation

Take, for example, D2O and H2O. As they have different densities, they should have a different maximum capillary height h, where h is defined according to Jurin's law. Then, each isotope of D and H ...
Young Jun Lee's user avatar
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2 answers
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Is the force of surface tension acting on a liquid mensicus in a capillary tube an internal force for the surface?

When we calculate the excess pressure on the concave side of the meniscus of the liquid surface formed in a capillary tube, we balance the force by the atmospheric pressure, force by the pressure on ...
Aditya Mukherjee's user avatar
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180 views

Why is there excess pressure on the concave side of liquid meniscus in a capillary tube?

I understand the derivation for the expression of excess pressure inside a liquid drop, but, most books also use this concept of excess pressure for explaining the rise of liquid column inside a ...
Aditya Mukherjee's user avatar
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Should we regard a capillary tube as a source of potential energy?

When a capillary tube is inserted into a large body of water, there is an increase in potential energy (PE) of the system. This is because the increase in PE of the rising water in the capillary is ...
Brian F's user avatar
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Why does capillary effect occur? [duplicate]

It is seen that water moves up in cases as given in the image. What causes this action?
Shristeerupa's user avatar
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Meniscus of water after breaking the capillary

Let us take the capillary dipped in water and we let the water climb normally till its maximum height. Now we break the capillary (assume clean cleavage so there aren't any rough surfaces produced) at ...
Kshitij Kumar's user avatar
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Relation between surface tension and contact angle [duplicate]

The higher the surface tension, the lower the contact angle. Is there a well defined mathematical relation between surface tension and contact angle?
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Meniscus shape on complete wetting

What happens when a liquid wets a solid completely , then what will be meniscus shape in long tube , and I recieved answers telling it will be concave. But in concave , contact angle is non zero and I ...
Sahil Kumar's user avatar
5 votes
2 answers
372 views

What is the name of the physics concept where water runs back under the edge of the roofing? Is it just surface tension?

I work as an apprentice roofer and I'm interested in the why of things. Nobody I have asked can confidently answer this question so here I am. This diagram shows the phenomenon: The image is from ...
PokerFacempty1's user avatar
2 votes
0 answers
39 views

Capillary pressure for large contact angles

The capillary pressure is calculated according to the following relation. $$P_{cap} = \dfrac{2\sigma cos\theta}{r}$$ Is this relation valid for all contact angles i.e. $\theta \lt 90^\circ$ and $\...
Wiz123's user avatar
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Difference between laplace and capillary pressure

Is there a difference between laplace and capillary pressure in the context of immiscible fluids?
Wiz123's user avatar
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2 answers
435 views

Why is the water level in the tube tilted instead of horizontal, like the water level in the rest of the cup?

The first photo is the original photo I took, while the second one has a faint red outline of the surface level of the water inside the tube and a faint blue line on the surface level of the cup. The ...
ned.nerd256's user avatar
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Confusion regarding oscillation of water in a straw

A drinking straw is dipped in a pan of water to depth $d$ from the surface (see figure below). Now water is sucked into it up to an initial height $h_0$ and then left to oscillate. As a result, its ...
insipidintegrator's user avatar
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Vacuum capillary to sample pressure at 1 atm

I've been trying to design a system to measure pressure at 1 atm using an RGA (Residual Gas Analyzer) from a vacuum. However, this is higher pressure than the RGA is used to (it likes to measure at ...
Ern88's user avatar
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Is capillary pressure significant?

I have a hydraulic system pressure to be measured in cm of water. It is done by tapping a graded tube, and simply measuring the height of the water column (usually at around 10-20 cm of water). If I ...
Lnunes's user avatar
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Ability of some porous solids to tentatively sit on water for a while before sinking

How does a porous solid such as the cereal "Wheatena" manage to tentatively sit on water for a while before sinking? I assume it initially somehow evades capillary action, perhaps through ...
Sketcher's user avatar
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1 answer
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Water coming out of a capillary tube when height is reduced below initial level

Consider a capillary tube of height $H_1$. Water raises to a height $h_1$ in this tube. Now the capillary tube is cut such that its new height is $H_2 < h_1$. I've read in many textbooks and other ...
Centelle's user avatar
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2 answers
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What is the mistake in this derivation of capillary rise, using equal pressures at equal height?

I have seen derivations of capillary height using force equations: $$2\pi RT \cos{\theta} = \rho \pi R^{2}hg$$ which gives, $$h = \frac{2T\cos{\theta}}{\rho gR}$$ Now, if we go about this another way, ...
Nishaanth S's user avatar
1 vote
0 answers
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Micrometric glass beads sticking on glass or plastic funnel wall

I am making a granular raft on a water-air interface. Granular rafts are made of micrometric or millimetric particles generally heavier than the liquid but still float on the interface due to their ...
Ranit Mukherjee's user avatar
12 votes
4 answers
829 views

Molecular origin of solid-liquid and solid-vapour surface tension

I understand that surface tension arises at the liquid-vapour interface due to the asymmetric nature of long-range attractive forces and the short-range repulsive forces acting on the interface where ...
Apoorv Potnis's user avatar
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1 answer
70 views

Wetting liquids should NOT rise in a capillary tube according the gauge (Laplace) pressure formula. But they do!

In this image, the capillaries on the left-hand side contain a wetting liquid. Applying the gauge formula for the curved liquid surface we have $P_a-P_l=\frac{2\sigma}{R}^{*}.$ Where $\sigma$ is the ...
Osmium's user avatar
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What is this liquid flow behavior called?

Every morning, when I take a clean, dry metal tumbler and fill it with hot coffee, the first sip is always different than the rest that follow. The first sip requires some coaxing, for me to tip the ...
Jason P Sallinger's user avatar
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1 answer
251 views

Capillary action in presence of weight and atmospheric pressure

In capillary action the water for example rises in a small-diameter-glass tube due to that the cohesive and adhesive forces are larger than gravity and fall if they were less than gravity .The ...
Jesse Flynn's user avatar
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1 answer
72 views

Capillary action, pressure at differents places

I figured out that I really have no intuition about pressure in capillary action. I understand the math, especially forces (tension force and gravitational force), but the pressure is foreign to me. ...
Edward Henry Brenner's user avatar
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0 answers
31 views

Insufficient height of capillary and liquid still doesn't spill [duplicate]

This is the case of a insufficient capillary tube. The liquid can actually reach up to a height of >h ,but we have limited the height of the capillary tube and made it smaller than what actually ...
PATRICK's user avatar
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2 answers
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Why is there a pressure difference of $h\rho g$ at the top of tube between inner and outer surface in capillary rise?

A glass capillary tube is of the shape of a truncated cone with an apex angle alpha so that it's two ends have cross sections of different radius. When dipped in water vertically, water rises to a ...
tryst with freedom's user avatar
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1 answer
146 views

Capillary action in conical capillary tube

Hi! I want to clear my concepts regarding surface tension . This approach works well in case of a cylindrical tube but fails when the tube is conical. Why so? I tried this question by balancing the ...
Nimit Jain's user avatar
2 votes
0 answers
23 views

Surface tension (capillary action)

Why we assume that meniscus that is formed when a capillary tube is immersed in a liquid is spherical (neglecting mass of the meniscus)? What will be the shape of the meniscus when mass is not ...
anand's user avatar
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1 answer
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Effect of temperature on capillary action

As a science teacher, I always explain kids about how water rises in a capillary tube: Capillary action occurs when the adhesion to the walls is stronger than the cohesive forces between the liquid ...
ofenerci's user avatar
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1 answer
102 views

Capillary action on capillary joints

There isn't much to say. In this question $B$ & $C$ are correct answers, and I can see how. However, I don't know how $D$'s validity could be determined. The solutions claimed that water will not ...
HERO's user avatar
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1 answer
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How does a sponge absorb water?

I am studying for YIPT questions. I want to know what are the parameters that help sponge to absorb liquid ?
kia dalaei's user avatar
1 vote
0 answers
74 views

Big confusion in surface tension

I am a high school student and I am very confused in the concept of surface tension and capillary rise phenomenon, my school level textbooks is very ambiguous about it they first tell you that the ...
Arun Bhardwaj's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
527 views

Which are the radii of curvature in the Laplace Pressure formula?

Laplace pressure is given by $$\Delta p=\gamma \left(\frac{1}{R}+\frac{1}{R'}\right)$$ where $R$ and $R'$ are the radii of the curvature of the surface. Using the following diagram There are at least ...
user avatar
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1 answer
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Why isn't the capillary tube displaced downward by the column of water?

Water moves upward in a capillary tube due to intermolecular forces between water and the glass wall of the capillary tube. If those forces act on water pushing it up, why don't we see the opposite ...
user avatar
1 vote
0 answers
37 views

Surface tension and capillary rise intution

I am high school student I am very confused in "surface tension", My confusion is that: 1) In this image I have shown that, In some books the reason for this shape of meniscus is explained ...
Arun Bhardwaj's user avatar
1 vote
2 answers
91 views

Law of conservation of energy and potential energy

I completely understand how this law goes and how energy is changed from one form to another. But there is something that I thought about, we all know how the potential energy works and when an object ...
Cattosphere's user avatar
2 votes
1 answer
80 views

Does capillary action work in moving bodies?

If I were to have a capillary tube on a moving body such as an ocean buoy, would it still be able to draw the liquid upwards? Or would the turbulence slow down or stop capillary action?
a43nigam's user avatar
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1 answer
611 views

Why can't capillary tubes overflow due to this reason? [duplicate]

It is known that raises to a certain height based on the parameters of surface tension, the radius of the tube, etc. Given by the formula $$h=\frac{2S\cos \theta}{\rho Rg}$$ When the capillary tube is ...
Linkin's user avatar
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Why do we consider only liquid-air surface forces in capillary rise?

Consider this diagram from wikipedia. Now the diagram clearly depicts forces due to three interfaces. But in the derivation of capillary rise, we only consider the force due to Surface Tension of the ...
Tony Stark's user avatar
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2 answers
943 views

Laplace pressure

I'm quite confused with Laplace pressure. I know the formula is (at least considering a spherical surface) $\Delta P = P_{in}-P_{out} = \frac{4\sigma}{d}$. What exactly is the surface you have to ...
Kevin's user avatar
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2 answers
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Smaller droplets == smaller surface tension?

When applying soap liquid on the inner surface of swim goggles, the surface tension of the water decreases and small droplets of water on the surface won't form, therefore the fog won't form. In this ...
gravedigger's user avatar
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2 answers
498 views

What would happen if two liquids of different nature are mixed together?

I was studying surface tension the other day and this thought came to my mind. What would happen if say a liquid like mercury which has higher cohesive forces than adhesive ones(hence the convex ...
Koustubh Jain's user avatar
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1 answer
171 views

Capillary rise of water in a capillary tube

While I was selfstudying capillary rise I came to a point thinking how the meniscus in both ends of a water drop in a capillary tube would appear if it were falling under gravity then I built my ...
Tia DS's user avatar
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1 answer
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Why does the liquid column in a capillary tube exert pressure as its weight is already balanced by surface tension?

I read that the meniscus, due to surface tension, exerts an upward pull to the liquid column below it. The water rises to a height until the weight balances the pull. Now liquid exerts pressure ...
Piyush Katyal's user avatar
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3 answers
1k views

Measurement of Surface Tension of a Liquid by Capillary Rise Method [closed]

The surface tension at the point of contact for water is inwards (as written in my book) so that would mean it vertical component is downwards but why is that vertical component considered upwards? I ...
Meow's user avatar
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