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Questions tagged [birefringence]

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42 views

Physical origin of Kerr effect

I was wondering if someone could explain to me the physical (not mathematical) origin behind the Kerr effect and why it results in birefringence in materials. Also, can the birefringence be introduced ...
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1answer
38 views

Birefringence in uniaxial materials

In linear optics, when treating anisotropic uniaxial materials we get the frensel equation this equation gives us two solution for n. My problem is that according to Snell's law, if I have two ...
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1answer
87 views

Why is Nicol prism cut at 68 degrees specifically?

Why not just some other angle but this specific one? Does it help in some way to polarize the ray? I have tried searching everywhere, but they only show that the crystal is cut at an angle of 68 ...
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1answer
56 views

The refractive index of blood serum with covid-19? [closed]

I'm looking for the refractive index of the blood containing the antibodies of covid-19.
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17 views

Optic axis in Birefringent material

Is the direction of optic axis same at all points for a non uniform calcite crystal stone or any other non uniform birefringent material?
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1answer
48 views

Birefringent materials and Maxwell equation

Maxwell's equations define the speed of light in a given medium at a given point through the equation: $$\frac{\partial^2E}{\partial t^2}=\mu\epsilon\nabla^2E$$ so according to it, the speed of light ...
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2answers
137 views

How could light from a TV screen refract when viewed through a helmet's transparent visor? [duplicate]

How could light from a TV screen refract when viewed through a helmet's transparent visor?
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0answers
48 views

Refraction at perpendicular incidence in Normaski prism?

my question pertains to this: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nomarski_prism In the diagram shown in the wiki page as well as the diagrams used in the slides for our course, the incident light ray is ...
2
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1answer
63 views

Circular polarizer filter wavelength dependency?

I don't fully understand the circular polarizer filter (CPL) for my camera. It contains a linear polarizer and a quarter wavelength plate (QWP). The QWP causes a time delay between the ordinary and ...
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0answers
28 views

Metamaterial with index of refraction different in opposite directions

Has anyone created a mathematical model for a material whose index of refraction is different going right than it is for light traveling to the left?
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0answers
89 views

Birefringent filters: Showing that phase shift is inversely proportional to wavelength from my data

I started out by taking two sets of data for the crossed and parallel setup without the birefringent filter. The crossed setup being when destructive interference occurs and the parallel being ...
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0answers
22 views

Vacuum Birefringence with alternating EM waves

I read [1] that in the presence of strong static electric or magnetic fields in vacuum the refractive index changes in such a way that there is a difference of refractive index between parallel and ...
0
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1answer
15 views

Why do we need cross-polarised light for observing conoscopic interference patterns?

I've performed some experiments for projecting conoscopic interference patterns. In some set-ups are used two circular polarizers one before and one after the birefringent crystal. I can imagine that ...
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1answer
179 views

Vacuum birefringence

Many of the papers (e.g., this) dealing with nonlinear electrodynamics treat a theory's prediction of vacuum birefringence as undesirable, but don't explain why it would be undesirable. For example: ...
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1answer
102 views

Does the polarized light lose intensity when it crosses a birefractive crystal?

If a beam of light coming from a natural source passes through a polarizer and then through a birefringent crystal, does the intensity with which it left the polarizer change?
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3answers
219 views

Torque on Quarter-Wave Plate

When circularly polarized light is passed through a quarter-wave plate, the plate experiences a torque. I understand this is true because angular momentum must be conserved, but I don't understand ...
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1answer
101 views

What sort of polarizer is this?

I wanted to try to experiment with polarizers, trying the 3 polarizers 45 degrees from each other, and similar experiments. I ordered 10 sheets of the cheapest polarizing foil I could find on ...
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2answers
879 views

What does the refractive index for e.g. alpha mean?

When I look for some materials like https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Barium_sulfate and want to extract the refractive index then there is written: (nD)=1.636 (alpha). And sometimes also for beta and ...
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0answers
92 views

Birefringent properties in Mylar films

Does Mylar film has birefringence properties? I am unsure about this and would like to know the reason behind its properties.
4
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1answer
99 views

Why are birefringence materials so rare?

By symmetry, most crystals will show birefringence. But the effect is very minute. So the question is actually, why is the birefrigence effect in most low-symmetry materials so small?
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1answer
200 views

Birefringent filter, optical path length difference?

In 'The Light Fantastic' by Kenyon, I.R. (p424), it is said that for a birefringent material inclined at Brewster's angle and who's optical axis lies in the plane of the plate, we have an optical path ...
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1answer
789 views

What happens if polarized light passes through calcite or some other birefringent material?

every explanation of birefringence I find talks about unpolarized light entering Calcite, but what if I use a polarized light? Will that mean that as I rotate the crystal the light will disappear then ...
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1answer
905 views

Application of Snell's law for an extraordinary wave?

I have read [1] that when the light enters a birefringent material with optical axis perpendicular to the plane of incidence that the angle of refraction of the extraordinary wave can be found by ...
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0answers
46 views

optical homogeneity of organic thin films

Prior to further analysis (like variable angle ellipsometric spectroscopy) I check thin films of organic materials vacuum deposited on glass substrates for their optical homogeneity under lineraly ...
4
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1answer
4k views

Why don't extraordinary rays follow Snell's law?

I understand that ordinary ray (O-ray) and extra-ordinary ray (e-ray) have different refractive indices. This should mean O-ray and e-ray move with different velocities in a substance and they should ...