Questions tagged [binding-energy]

Please use binding energy in the context of the atomic scale and/or atomic systems. This can be used in nuclear reactions.

Filter by
Sorted by
Tagged with
0
votes
2answers
872 views

What is the energy transformation in the fission reaction?

According to one of my physics textbooks, when U-235 absorbs a neutron it becomes unstable and soon fissions into two separate atoms. The forces driving these two atoms apart are electrostatic forces ...
0
votes
3answers
2k views

Confusion on electron volt and Kelvin?

If an element A has a binding energy of X eV with element B, can it be said that it is equivalent to X*11600K as 1 eV approx equals 11600K. I do not think this is correct as temp. is linked to the ...
1
vote
0answers
57 views

I want to know about the quantization of mass [duplicate]

Is mass quantized? If yes, then why do we see all amounts of mass? Well , can it be said quantized just for smaller masses?
8
votes
3answers
13k views

Why only light nuclei are able to undergo nuclear fusion not heavy nuclei?

Is it because of the binding energy or the binding energy per nuclei . I am having trouble with this whole binding energy and nuclear fusion concept.
2
votes
0answers
366 views

Binding energy of a galaxy?

I'm a novice in physics and new to the forms, so please forgive me if this is a dumb question or if this is in the wrong section to be posted, but how would one find the gravitational binding energy ...
2
votes
0answers
79 views

Why do the masses of decay products affect the branching ratio?

Consider a particle $P$ of mass $100m$ (where $m$ is some unit). It can decay into either of two particle-antiparticle pairs: $P\to P_1\bar{P}_1$ with branching ratio $BR_1$, where $P_1$ has mass $...
0
votes
2answers
365 views

exciton binding energy and orbital binding energy

What is the difference between an exciton binding energy and orbital binding energy? I can see no difference between them since when an exciton is created, the electron is excited to the next (or one ...
2
votes
2answers
4k views

Why has a molecule less energy than the uncombined atoms?

My book says, A molecule as compared to the atoms from which it is formed is more stable because it possesses energy lower than the energy of the uncombined atoms. This difference in energy is due ...
1
vote
0answers
49 views

How does a Collider work? [closed]

How does a collider work, explained using various Physics theories (or if there is a main one) . How does the acceleration play a part in the individual sub-atomic kinetic levels. What happens when ...
16
votes
2answers
10k views

Why is Iron the most stable element? [duplicate]

Iron has the highest binding energy per nucleon in the entirety of the known elements. But why Iron specifically? What makes it have the highest binding energy per nucleon?
2
votes
1answer
827 views

Why do products of nuclear decay have a lower mass than the original nucleus, when the sum of the mass of its nucleons is larger? [duplicate]

I've just started covering the topic of binding energy in Year 13 at school (final year before University). The definition we've been given of binding energy is that it is the work done when ...
0
votes
1answer
113 views

How is electromagnetic binding energy introduced in the stress-energy tensor

Take the hydrogen atom. It is easy to imagine that the gravitational pull it creates is smaller than the sum of those of the proton plus the electron, because a photon of 13.6 eV was created when the ...
0
votes
1answer
55 views

How can one interaction influence the way another interaction generates mass?

This question arose as a follow-up of this one and applies generally to all interactions and all ways to generate mass. To make it clear, I take here the example of the neutron, whose mass is in ...
2
votes
2answers
314 views

Gravitational binding energy of 2D circle [closed]

I'm interested in calculating the gravitational binding energy for an object modelled by 2D circle for a small collision simulator. In the simulation, I'm using a 2D equivalents of 3D properties (e.g ...
8
votes
3answers
739 views

Are chemical bonds matter?

So it recently blew my mind that chemical bonds have mass. And that a spring that's wound up similarly weights a little more. But there is a distinction between mass and matter. I believe that a ...
1
vote
1answer
186 views

Can energy be weighed?

The binding energy of nucleus is calculated as- Mass defect = (Total mass of nucleons-Mass of the nucleus) And after that $E=mc^2$ is used for calculating the binding energy. Hot water is heavier ...
2
votes
1answer
1k views

Does the rest mass energy include the potential energy of the particle?

The potential energy (as far as I have studied - that is, mainly classical physics) depends on the reference level, since its absolute value cannot be calculated. It can therefore be negative as well. ...
0
votes
2answers
151 views

Does chemical energy contribute to mass? [duplicate]

Does chemical energy contribute to the mass of an object? I don't mean the bond energy, but the possible energy that could be released (i.e. Does an atom of oxygen and a molecule of hydrogen (H2) have ...
2
votes
0answers
111 views

How to explain binding energy of electron in Geant4 particle transport code?

The question is related to binding energy of electrons in oxygen atom. First I will put the question and later explain how did I came across it. ========= The question =============== In the Geant4....
1
vote
1answer
125 views

How does fusion work in the Sun if neutrons have more mass than protons?

According to my textbook, the next result of the fusion reactions in the Sun is: 4H -> He + neutrinos + gamma photons However, if hydrogen atoms are basically a proton and helium atoms are 2 protons ...
1
vote
3answers
113 views

Is there an example of a situation where you need a continuous spectrum?

If you had a hydrogen atom you could say that you want to be able to ionize them. But if you then add the potential due to the earth, e.g. $$V=\frac{-Gm_eM_\oplus}{\sqrt{(x_e-x_\oplus)^2+(y_e-y_\oplus)...
2
votes
3answers
277 views

What is the binding energy of a black hole?

As the particles which constitute a black hole collapse they become tightly bound. I assume this means a lot of energy would be required to liberate a particle from that bound state. Is it a finite ...
1
vote
1answer
438 views

How covalent bonding lower the energy of potential energy? [duplicate]

Considering the potential energy of interacting particles, how does covalent bonding lower the energy of the system?
5
votes
3answers
2k views

What is the binding energy of a neutron star?

Neutrons which constitute a neutron star have a rest mass that is greater when separated from the star because they are bound with a certain potential energy. This potential energy causes the system ...
25
votes
3answers
4k views

Do chemical bonds have mass?

When an exothermic reaction occurs, the energy in the chemical bonds of the reactants is partially transferred to the chemical bonds of the products. The remaining energy is released as heat. For ...
5
votes
1answer
982 views

Binding energy and mass

I’ve been told that a greater binding energy means the nucleus is more tightly bound, and therefore that decreases the mass of the nucleus with respect to its nucleons when separated. But why does a ...
9
votes
4answers
7k views

Why are heavier nuclei unstable?

If you have more neutrons than protons, then there will be more strong force present to counteract the repulsive forces between protons. Why is it that above bismuth, no nucleus is stable, regardless ...
0
votes
2answers
300 views

What is the binding energy in General Relativity?

In general relativity, the potential energy is given by $$V(r)=\frac{h^{2}}{2r^{2}}\left(1-\frac{2M}{r}\right)-\frac{M}{r}.$$ Solving $V^{\prime}(r)=0$, there are two points where circular orbits ...
1
vote
1answer
155 views

Why do elements on the Binding Energy per Nuclear Molecule after Iron (most stable) even form?

So I was reading about the stability of elements based on Nuclear Binding Energy, and I saw that the 'Iron group' of elements were most tightly bound and hence most stable, and that is why the graph ...
1
vote
3answers
356 views

Is it possible for man to break Earth into 2 parts? [closed]

Many countries have extreme devastating nuclear weapons. Also they have weapons in very large numbers. I want to ask that Is it possible for man to break earth into 2 parts with the help ...
1
vote
1answer
814 views

Total energy of neutrons and protons

In a stable nucleus, are the total energies of neutrons and protons same?
10
votes
3answers
16k views

When a nucleus is split, what form of energy is released?

When an nucleus is split, what form of energy is released? All of the websites I have looked at say there is a lot of energy released when an atom is split, but it never says what form of energy it is ...
2
votes
3answers
809 views

Coupling fission and fusion and disappear all mass. Why doesn't this happen?

I'm confused about the fact that in a fission process the masses of the "products" are less than the mass of the "reactants". And in a fusion process the masses of the "products" are less than the ...
1
vote
1answer
187 views

Binding energy per nucleon dependency

For a given isotope, does the nuclear binding energy per nucleon depend on the presence of electrons? For instance, if an electron was excited by an incoming photon and jumps to a different orbital, ...
4
votes
3answers
9k views

Why do only heavy radioactive elements perform fission?

Why do only heavy radioactive elements perform fission? I mean what's so special about heavy elements which makes them ideal for nuclear fission? Also why do only neutrons show fission/fusion and why ...
1
vote
0answers
733 views

Asymmetry Term in the Semi-Empirical Mass Formula

Could someone explain to me in simple terms what the asymmetry term means and how it is derived. I don't really want a full fledged mathematical derivation, but more the basic principle and idea ...
9
votes
2answers
1k views

Why more Fe-56 than Ni-62 as fusion product in heavy stars?

Suppose we create an Fe-56 nucleus and an Ni-62 nucleus, each from individual protons and neutrons. In the case of Ni-62, more mass per nucleon is converted to binding energy. Thus we could argue the ...
2
votes
2answers
6k views

Energy from 1 gram of fuel in a nuclear power plant?

It might go without saying, but I am asking about a fission reactor. I assume the fuel still has mass after it is used. If I am right about that, I can't use $E=m*c^2$ to answer my question. Hence my ...
-6
votes
2answers
542 views

BINDING ENERGY OR BINDING ENERGY PER NEUCLEON REMAINS CONSTANT [duplicate]

Which one is constant BINDING ENERGY or BINDING ENERGY PER NEUCLEON? I GOT LOTS OF ANS. BUT I CAN`T UNDERSTAND. IS NEITHER OF THE IS CONSTANT?
0
votes
2answers
436 views

What is an element's “weight” when talking about “elements heavier than iron” being formed in supernovae

I always hear that elements heavier than iron are formed in supernovae. But, what is taken as an element's weight? I had always believed that this meant any elements with an atomic number greater than ...
1
vote
1answer
124 views

Protons and Neutrons Overshoot Actual Mass? [duplicate]

When I add up the mass of 6 protons and 6 neutrons in amu, I get a mass that is greater than the mass of carbon. I thought that it should be the other way around, because I have not including binding ...
0
votes
2answers
829 views

Semi-empirical mass formula [closed]

The mass formula is given by $M(Z,A) = ZM_{p}+(A-Z)M_{n}-a_{1}A+a_{2}A^\frac{2}{3}+a_{3}\frac{Z(Z-1)}{A^\frac{1}{3}}+a_{4}\frac{(Z-A/2)^2}{A}+a_{5}A^\frac{-1}{2}$ So I am just wondering here what ...
0
votes
1answer
244 views

Mass of an Atom

So the mass deficit of an atom, denoted by $\Delta M(Z,A)$, is given by the following formula, $\Delta M(Z,A) = M(Z,A) - Z(M_{p} + m_{e}) -NM_{n}$ However since the rest mass of an electron is a lot ...
1
vote
3answers
702 views

Binding Energy of an atom

I would like to know if there is any difference between the binding energy of a nucleus and the binding energy of an atom and what exactly do we mean when we say Binding energy per nucleon.. Edit to ...
1
vote
0answers
767 views

What is the difference between mass defect and mass deficit?

Is there any difference between the mass defect and the mass deficit? I have read that the mass defect of a nuclide is never negative and have also been told that the mass defect is the same as the ...
1
vote
2answers
1k views

Binding energy of Helium and repulsion of protons

I've just done an exercise of computing the binding energy of Helium 4, which is around 27,43 MeV. Obviously the binding energy "compensates" for the repulsion between the protons due to their charges....
1
vote
0answers
861 views

Mirror nuclei: accounting for the difference in mass between nuclei

I was wondering if anyone here could guide me in the right direction with respect to the following problem: Two nuclei are considered mirror nuclei if interchanging the neutrons and protons turns ...
0
votes
2answers
679 views

The semi-empirical formula and $E=mc^2$

The semi-empirical formula is used to find the binding energy of a nucleus. But if you know the mass of a nucleus and the number of neutrons and protons that this nucleus consists of (and you know ...
3
votes
4answers
11k views

Why is the total energy of an orbiting system negative?

Assume it's an circular orbit. Object A orbits around object B. Take object B as frame of reference. .$E=KE_a + GPE$ .$E=\frac 12m_av_a^2 +(-\frac {GM_bm_A}r)$ .$E=\frac 12m_a(GM_br)+(-\frac {...
2
votes
2answers
90 views

The mass/energy of an $H$-atom and the gravitational force between it and another particle of mass $m$

The gravitational force between an $H$-atom and another particle of mass $m$ will be given by Newton's law: $$F=\frac{GMm}{r^2}$$ The question is, what is $M$ here? I thought the answer would be $$...