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0
votes
1answer
45 views

What is the pressure of water after entering atmosphere? [closed]

I was wondering if water exits from the pump and reach the ground, is the pressure of the water at the point of the ground be 0?
2
votes
5answers
183 views

If atmospheric pressure is 76 cm of $\text{Hg}$ , why won't 76 cm of mercury stay in an open tube when suspended in air?

If we keep an hold a tube in air with the closed end up and open end downwards, containing mercury upto a length of 76 cm, why does the mercury not stay in place? Shouldn't atmospheric pressure exert ...
0
votes
1answer
39 views

Bouyancy of ozone gas

If ozone is $O_3$ why is it an outer layer of the atmosphere? It seems $O_3$ would sink in a solution of $O_2$, rather than float on it.
-1
votes
1answer
41 views

Is it possible to drain all oceans' water to space? [duplicate]

Assuming: That I have an ideal straw (a very long pipe) from the ocean to space; That the straw (pipe) is ideal (will not break); That i can pump all the air from the pipe creating vacuum inside the ...
6
votes
2answers
207 views

Would a human die from high air pressure at the bottom of the Mariana trench if it wasn't under water?

I read an article recently about gelatinous fish that live deep underwater, and if they were brought up to the surface would 'melt' due to the lower pressure not supporting their bodies. This got me ...
0
votes
1answer
67 views

Air Pressure in a Mine

In Sunday's "60 Minutes" TV program the correspondent descended into a gold mine said to be 2 miles (3 km) deep. What equation describes the air pressure relative to sea level atmospheric pressure?
1
vote
1answer
28 views

What is the difference of pressure of a gas in a closed container at a given distance from the Earth?

If I have a closed container of a given height $(h)$, located at a given distance from the centre of the Earth $(r_o)$, what would the pressure difference be at the top of the container vs the bottom? ...
3
votes
0answers
93 views

Weird and unintuitive results from thermodynamics/hydrostatics for an isothermal atmosphere and possible explanation(?)

It is known from hydrostatics that for a fluid in equilibrium in a gravitational field, $$\frac{dP}{dz} = -ρg$$ Let us from now on suppose the atmosphere is isothermal and has temperature $T$. We ...
0
votes
3answers
59 views

Atmospheric Density

As I was reading my textbook, I noted that it stated that the atmosphere becomes less dense as height increases. I am unable to understand this. I understand that pressure decreases as height ...
0
votes
1answer
61 views

The link between two definitions of “potential density”

In Kundu's book , 4ed, P21, they define the potential density $\rho_\theta$ like this: However, later in P22, they define the potential density gradient as It seems to me that the potential density ...
3
votes
1answer
525 views

Why can't hot air balloons fly higher then helium balloons?

I have read these questions: Hot air balloon trajectory predictions Do atmospheric physics prevent hot air balloons from ascending over 60,000ft? What is precisely the reason that a helium balloon ...
0
votes
1answer
95 views

Space Straw - Pressures and Possibility [duplicate]

So, Thinking Again :/ If we built a tunnel, out into space far beyond our atmosphere and opened it up Would the resulting differences in pressure then effectively suck out the interior of our ...
2
votes
3answers
351 views

Why does pressure behave exponentially in the atmosphere?

I wonder why the pressure is exponentially within the atmosphere but (almost?) linear in the sea?
-1
votes
1answer
26 views

Finding pressure differences considering variations in different parameters [duplicate]

I have a place where the density of air at sea level is $\rho_0$ and the atmospheric pressure is $P_0$. Now suppose I want to calculate the pressure of air at a certain height h above the sea level, ...
4
votes
3answers
605 views

Why aren't we crushed by the weight of the atmosphere?

I've read the answers to the similar question here on StackExchange but didn't find them satisfactory. People's answers were in short that we aren't crushed by the weight of the atmosphere because our ...
0
votes
2answers
71 views

Why is the air denser at low heights? [duplicate]

I don't know if it applies to all fluids , but why is air denser at lower heights ?
1
vote
2answers
191 views

Lifting submerged straw above 10m

Suppose a long rigid pipe (e.g., 30m) open at both ends is completely submerged into some deep body of water. The pipe gets completely filled with water. Then, one end gets closed and the pipe is ...
-1
votes
1answer
379 views

Why don't cloud water droplets fall to the ground? [duplicate]

Clouds are made of extremely small droplets of water ranging from 1 to 100 microns. Their high surface area to volume ratio means that air resistance would greatly slow their fall. However, ...
-1
votes
1answer
61 views

If you released a book from the thermosphere or mesosphere would the book float slightly?

If you released a book from the thermosphere or mesosphere would the book float slightly?
0
votes
3answers
7k views

Air Density as a function of Altitude ONLY [closed]

I have read this question and doesn't really achieve what I am trying to do. I am looking for a function of the type r(x)=.... Which returns the density of air at altitude x for Earth conditions ...
0
votes
1answer
2k views

What height is atmospheric pressure half that at sea level?

$PV = NT$, where T is a constant $P = \rho g h$ but I don't think this equation can hold in this form as the density is most definitely not constant as we go up in the atmosphere $\rho = \frac{M}{V}$...
1
vote
3answers
701 views

Pressure and altitude

I am going to ask a simple question, for sure. The pressure with respect to the altitude is given by this formula Where sea level standard atmospheric pressure p0 = 101325 Pa sea level standard ...
14
votes
7answers
5k views

How to keep a helium balloon between 1 to 5 meters above ground? (without it being tied)

I understand that helium balloons rise because their density is less than air, so they can rise up to a point where the air surrounding it has the same weight as the balloon. I was thinking to fill it ...
3
votes
4answers
2k views

How can the atmospheric pressure be different in distinct points at the same altitude?

From an hydrostatic point of view, the pressure in a fluid should be the same at the same depth/altitude. Obviously, in our atmosphere that does not happen. I am guessing that the main reason is the ...
1
vote
1answer
190 views

Could a big enough straw stretching from Earth to space eject atmosphere into space? [duplicate]

Assuming the straw can be built out of any material, shape, size. Would the vacuum effect of space acting on the pressurized gas have enough force to lift the weight of the atmosphere contained in ...
1
vote
1answer
910 views

Would a pipe from the surface to the Earth's exosphere suck all atmosphere to the space? [closed]

If I built a tube from Earth's surface to the exosphere, would all the air be sucked out to space? If this pipe reached to a big planet, like Jupiter, would its gravity through the pipe suck our ...
1
vote
2answers
352 views

Could a really tall tube suck garbage in to space?

When I was around 10 years old, I had this idea that was supposed to solve our waste problems; I imagined having tubes miles high that would stretch in to space. Every tube would have a door at the ...
24
votes
4answers
13k views

The Density of Clouds

Clouds are made up of tiny water or ice droplets, depending on temperature. This implies that cloud density is greater than that of dry air. Why don't clouds sink through their surrounding atmosphere ...