Questions tagged [amorphous-solids]

An amorphous solid is a condensed matter system with the mechanical properties of a solid, but lacking the long-range order characteristic of crystals. Examples of amorphous solids are glasses and gels.

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At which distance a 2D material like graphene is safe from charging impurity of a $\rm SiO_2$ substrate?

$\rm SiO_2$ substrate is widely used for the research of 2D materials but charging impurity of amorphous $\rm SiO_2$ degrades their performance, e.g. reduces the conductivity of graphene. Inserting ...
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Do some gases have short range order?

In the book "Essentials of Materials Science and Engineering" (Askeland, Fulay), it appears the following figure: We can read in the figure's description, subsection (b,c), that vapor and ...
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What physical property does the crossover frequency in an ionic conductor represent; why is conductivity constant below and increasing above it?

After reading an article about ionic transport1, I remain confused about why the behavior illustrated in Fig. 1 of the article happens. (Figure 1 is shown below.) Specifically, why is the conductivity ...
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Pitch drop experiment with (poly/mono)crystal

In 1927 a piece of pitch was placed in a funnel and since then pitch flowed at rate of about 1 drop per 10 years. Obviously we can repeat experiment with any amorphous solid. Viscosity of water is ...
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Is amorphous ice thermodynamically stable?

Amorphous ice is often produced by cooling liquid water below its glass transition temperature so fast that it does not have time to form ice crystals. The fact that this can only occur if the ...
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Why does vitrification cause less damage to biological tissue than freezing does?

Long-duration cryopreservation of biological tissue (most often semen, egg cells, or fertilized embryos) is typically done at 77 K, since the samples can be easily kept at that temperature by ...
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How is it possible for amorphous metal to have good magnetic properties?

Cross-posted on MMSE. It makes sense to me intuitively that the crystalline structure in, say, grain-oriented electrical steel would yield good magnetic properties. I am envisioning magnetic field ...
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Understanding the Static Structure Factor of a Liquid

I am trying to understand static structure factors, $S(Q)$, for liquids. This function represents pairwise correlations in reciprocal space and can be measured experimentally using X-ray or neutron ...
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UV light Skin depth for a Glass

From Wikipedia: $\delta = \sqrt{\dfrac{\rho}{\pi \cdot f \cdot \mu_r \cdot \mu_0}}$ $\rho$ for a glass was taken as $10^{11} \text{ } \Omega \cdot m $, $\mu_r$ for a glass was taken as $1$ (...
Victor Novak's user avatar
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Is there a theoretical equation for the $d$-spacing for an amorphous solid or a metastable crystal?

So I am trying to study and compare two different samples (thin films) of the same material but with different cooling rates. I made one that was cooled slowly, allowing it to nucleate and crystallize ...
A. Wells's user avatar
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How does amorphous $\rm SiO_2$ crystallize?

I know crystalline $\rm SiO_2$ changes its crystalline structure depending on temperature, but what happens to amorphous $\rm SiO_2$ if you heat it up? I could find nothing on this topic. Is it ...
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Why do oxides form amorphous films instead of crystalline films?

If I oxidize a metal at room temperature, say aluminum, why does it form an amorphous material instead of crystalline $\rm Al_2O_3$?
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SAXS vs. X-ray diffraction?

Both small-angle X-ray scattering and X-ray diffraction can be used to obtain structure factors, though I imagine the wave vectors accessible to each are different (?). What are the main differences ...
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Do the ideas of Bloch wavefunction and Bragg scattering of electrons which apply to crystals also apply to liquid Mercury?

Do the ideas of Bloch wavefunction and Bragg scattering of electrons which apply to crystals also apply to liquid Mercury ? Why is it that electrons in the liquid are not localised by the disordered ...
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Air bubble's weight measurement

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bubble_(physics) https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Soap_bubble https://www.instagram.com/p/CE4FSctpCdu/?utm_source=ig_web_button_share_sheet Is it possible to create air ...
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Is there a relation between the domains in broken (but not shattered) tempered glas and the amorphous structure of glass?

When a thick plate of glass is hit (strong enough) by an object (say a shoe, by which I don't like to encourage vandalism, but I think that's happened when I saw the glass plate at a train station). ...
Deschele Schilder's user avatar
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Which factors determine whether a substance will be amorphous or crystalline on solidification?

What decides whether a substance will be crystalline or amorphous when it solidifies? I heard various folklores that the method of condensation of a liquid (fast or slow cooling) can be a factor ...
Solidification's user avatar
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Why does squashed clay 'hug' the press rather than spreading out?

In this demonstration a piece of clay (or clay-like material) is squashed under a press. The lump of clay initially spreads out under the ram of the press. But once it reaches the edge of the ram ...
StayOnTarget's user avatar
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Loss of optical fibers -- where is the limit?

I'm wondering what is the physical limit of loss in optical fibers. How much of the loss, that can be seen in today's optical fibers can be removed by optimizing the production procedure and how much ...
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What gives amorphous solids their solidity?

I understand that amorphous solids (like glass and plastic) don't have a symmetric lattice structure to their molecules or atoms, as do typical solids. It is often said that their molecules are ...
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Solids are crystalline or amorphous. Where do polymers fit in?

Traditionally, solids are classified as being either crystalline (well-ordered, periodic lattice structure at large spatial scales) or amorphous (disordered structure). A well-ordered polymer is a ...
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My candle is growing living crystals

My candle had no wick left, so I put the jar on a coffee warmer to melt the wax and release the scent. It worked great, the house smelled good. Then I forgot about it. 2 days went by and I just ...
debra finley's user avatar
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Can amorphous solids have energy bands?

One can understand the formation of energy bands from the Kronig-Penny model which assumes a periodic potential. But I heard that even if the potential is aperiodic, for example in amorphous ...
Solidification's user avatar
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Why the first peak in the X-ray diffraction of an amorphous solid has significantly high, in terms of intensity than the second peak?

In the XRD pattern of an amorphous solid we do not observe sharp peaks. Instead we see only diffused peaks. Why these peaks are diffused and more importantly why the first peak is significantly high ...
Nilabja Kanti Sarkar's user avatar
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Bragg scattering off an array of wiggly lines

I'm currently working through some problems in Chaiken and Lubensky and I found that my understanding of scattering theory is weaker than I thought. So I could use a sanity check on this problem ...
Mr.Weathers's user avatar
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A metallic container when hammered deforms but a wine glass when falls or hammered breaks. Why?

A wine glass breaks when it falls from hand or is hammered. But when a metallic object (say, a container) is hammered, it only deforms without breaking. Why? Is it somehow related to the fact that ...
Solidification's user avatar
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How are sand blocks formed?

My son asked me at the beach how are "sand stones" formed. These are the solid (but fragile) sand conglomerates which you can hold in your hand and which crumble to sand once pressed. I tried some ...
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Is there an upper limit on the band-gap of insulators?

From the tight-binding picture of insulators, the band-gaps arise from the intrinsic energy differences between atomic orbitals energy levels. The largest I have found so far is roughly 10eV (...
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What is glass: amorphous solid or supercooled liquid?

I have read glass is amorphous solid and also supercooled liquid. I know that all solids are frozen liquids. But is it fair to say that everything which is an amorphous solid is also a supercooled ...
Solidification's user avatar
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Demystifying jamming in many-body systems

From a theoretical point of view, what has been the most successful approach to understanding jamming phenomena? I understand there's still a lot of debate around this subject, namely whether a ...
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Non-glassy amorphous solids

According to Wikipedia: A glass is any "solid that possesses a non-crystalline (that is, amorphous) structure at the atomic scale and that exhibits a glass transition when heated towards the liquid ...
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Why is amorphous classified solid?

Because it does not have a crystal structure, it is hard to find physical similarities with a solid. Why isn't it then another state other than solid? The physics of amorphous is also quite different ...
Novice Physicist's user avatar
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Why polymeric solids are said to be intermediate between crystalline solids and amorphous solids?

Crystalline solids have ordered arrangement and amorphous solids do not. Polymeric solids are simply formed by the joining of some monomeric units. It has nothing to do with ordered or not ordered ...
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What makes Obsidian edges sharper than other glass?

Obsidian is a volcanic glass with a reputation for being extremely sharp. Some surgeons use obsidian scalpels rather than high-quality steel surgical scalpels. At the same time, glass blades are used ...
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Is ice a type of glass?

It's kind of a tricky concept I assume, on one side you got those neat shared vertices of SiO2, on the other (water) you don't really have shared vertices, only kinda (but they still want to align ...
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Glass properties

This is a question about the properties and strength of glass. I know that glass is an amorphous solid but I am not sure if that is relevant to my question. My question is that if there's no physical ...
user1950278's user avatar
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Is glass a liquid?

I was told by a condensed matter physicist that glass is a liquid with a very high viscosity (it would be more precise to say that it is a supercooled liquid). The example given was that in cathedral ...
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nature of glass transition

I am reading in some book: "The glass transition is similar in appearance to a second-order phase transition, but it is not a true thermodynamic phase transition. This is because the transition ...
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Why does the d-spacing of a polymer decrease as its crystallinity increases?

I am currently investigating the annealing of a polymer (Parylene-C). In my reading I have found that when the polymer is annealed, there is a decrease in thickness of the film which results from a ...
user714852's user avatar
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2 answers
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Do amorphous metals undergo conchoidal fracture?

Amorphous metals are often referred to as metallic glasses due to their quenched atomic disorder. Do they fracture in the same fashion as silicate glasses? If not, what failure mode(s) do they have?
Richard Terrett's user avatar
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Phonons in non-crystalline media

Do sound waves in a gas consist of phonons? What about a glass? Or other non-crystalline materials such as quasicrystals? How does the lack of translational symmetry affect the quantization of the ...
Keenan Pepper's user avatar