Stack Exchange Network

Stack Exchange network consists of 175 Q&A communities including Stack Overflow, the largest, most trusted online community for developers to learn, share their knowledge, and build their careers.

Visit Stack Exchange

Questions tagged [aircraft]

Aircraft are man-made vehicles intended to operate while flying through Earth's atmosphere.

0
votes
0answers
15 views

Derivation of the expression of a propeller pitch distance

The pitch distance of a propeller is given by: $$p = 2\pi r \tan{\beta}$$ where $\beta$ is the pitch angle and $r$ is the radius. I cannot find how this expression was derived. Could you please ...
3
votes
0answers
62 views

Lighting an Electric Bulb with Earth's Magnetic Field

Yesterday, I was solving some problems of Electromagnetic Induction. Suddenly a thought struck my mind. Earth has its own magnetic Field.If an aircraft of metallic body is flying in the air then ...
2
votes
1answer
31 views

Why wasn't the Stipa-Caproni plane efficient in its flight?

The Stipa-Caproni was an experimental italian plane design. Though it has a very peculiar shape, it seems at first glance like it would have pretty good aerodynamic profile since its reference area ...
1
vote
2answers
57 views

Horizontal component of Coriolis force in an aircraft: compensating force with its wings angle

I have the following problem: "An aircraft is flying at 800 km/h in latitude 55◦ N. Find the angle through which it must tilt its wings to compensate for the horizontal component of the Coriolis ...
0
votes
0answers
24 views

Inverted flight [duplicate]

I've read the answers provided but I'm still confused that if an aerofoil is designed so that air flows faster over the upper surface for the purpose of providing lower pressure and hence lift why in ...
0
votes
2answers
50 views

Is lift force proportional to size?

I'm trying to calculate lift force of a particular object I'm working with. However, I can't find much information on how much force is required for an object to stay in flight though. My questions ...
2
votes
1answer
70 views

Principle of Lifting of an Aircraft [duplicate]

While using the Bernoulli's equation to deduce the upthrust on an aircraft , a statement is always made that The air particles going above th wing have to cover a greater distance in same time than ...
0
votes
1answer
82 views

Why dont we account the rotation of the earth in aircrafts? Is it just because of the air or is there more to it? [duplicate]

Today there was a seminar regarding modern air crafts held in my school. At the starting of the lecture, we were asked a question which I found quite intriguing. "Why does a helicopter or a fixed ...
0
votes
1answer
36 views

Motion of a contrail “vortex”

I want to understand what causes this motion on contrails (Cirricular motion) and it’s name if possible. What effects it? How and why is it formed?
1
vote
0answers
47 views

Rate of change of heading in terms of normal acceleration and air speed

Let's say an aircraft is traveling with speed $|\mathbf v|$ with respect to an inertial frame. The aircraft is able to execute turns by producing an acceleration $\mathbf a$ that is normal to $\mathbf ...
3
votes
3answers
89 views

Strange optical distortion in a video recorded from an airplane window

I recorded this video from an airplane window while it was decreasing its elevation. What is the explanation for this optical distortion? This distortion appeared only in a certain range of elevation. ...
1
vote
1answer
74 views

How do you explain the formation of shockwave on the wing surface during near sonic flight?

Explanations of shockwave for the common folks (youtube videos, googling) all tend to focus on successive sound waves generated by the air craft traveling outward in circles (sphere). That to me, ...
0
votes
1answer
32 views

Defining the change in direction due to wind

My question: Which force vector (A, B, C, or D) represents the APPROXIMATE direction in which the boat is travelling as a consequence of the wind? My approach: I looked for which vector combination ...
-3
votes
1answer
26 views

Effect of Bodyform on Air Resistance [duplicate]

Visualize those little pictures as the front of vehicles like airplanes and trains. I wonder if I am right about my speculation below, and if so, if somebody could explain the exact reason. Sources ...
-1
votes
1answer
71 views

How does gravity effect to aircraft in sky?

Aside aerodynamics and buoyancy, Is there a simple way to explain how gravity is negligible in flight paths using free falling body diagram? In a parabolic trajectory,we know that at max height, ...
0
votes
1answer
60 views

Why is the polar diagram of an airplane depended on weight?

Can anybody answer this question? Although aviation-related, it is in fact a fluid mechanics problem: https://aviation.stackexchange.com/questions/54192/why-is-polar-curve-of-a-glider-dependent-on-...
3
votes
2answers
101 views

Sonic Boom in Aircraft and Spacecraft

I would like to know why aircraft, and spacecraft produce a double sonic boom on breaking the sound barrier. A while ago, I thought I got it, as there’s a start and finish point to every vehicle. ...
1
vote
1answer
52 views

what would a “ceiling effect” (the converse of ground effect planes experience) entail?

Wikipedia describes ground effect as "the increased lift (force) and decreased aerodynamic drag that an aircraft's wings generate when they are close to a fixed surface." That's all fair and good, ...
0
votes
4answers
101 views

Effect of tailwind on aircraft speed

I have been spending some time in analyzing the impact of tailwind on the ground speed of the aircraft. My analysis is based around the following equation : VAW = VAG - VWG ; where VAW is the velocity ...
0
votes
0answers
48 views

Why do high powered jet engines have zero effect on clouds?

Something I've been questioning since I was a child and never found a logical answer for it so please be kind. Honest question here.... I've flown many times and I've watched countless airplanes/jets ...
3
votes
4answers
469 views

What causes the air speed difference above and below the wing of a plane?

I am studying about the lift generated by a fluid flowing on a surface. In the case of an airfoil I have seen that there are various ways to explain it, you can use for example: the third law of ...
-1
votes
2answers
79 views

When plane crashes

Could it be true that when the plane is falling to crash, one should start to jump. If the moment the plane crashes, you are in the air then, you are not affected by the momentum. That is very ...
-1
votes
2answers
71 views

How powerful can the vacuum from an open aircraft window be?

It has been an item of folklore that a "pressurized" aircraft cabin, if punctured will force people through the aperture, a la Goldfinger. However, obviously the pressures inside the cabin (12 PSI) ...
0
votes
1answer
64 views

Lightning strike on aircraft

Is an electromagnetic pulse sufficient to account for the complete dscharge of an aircraft struck by lightning?
1
vote
1answer
32 views

How would I calculate the speed passengers 'jump' based on the speed and displacement of a plane during turbulence?

I read recently that if I'm in a plane that hits turbulence, the plane might only move 1 to 20ft. However, due to the speed that plane is travelling at (say cruising at 550mph). The passengers in the ...
2
votes
1answer
134 views

What does it mean that the weight is negative?

In a recent question on the Aviation Stack Exchange, one explained that would cause an autogyro's crash. Basically, it says that the one thing that would make the gyro crash is to unload the motor too ...
0
votes
1answer
77 views

Airplane trails

Some airplanes leave a trail through some regions of sky. This post explains why it is so, but it seems not enough. The trail is said to be made mostly of water which, on a specific altitude, ...
-2
votes
2answers
1k views

Flying with or against rotation of a planet

So, I've read a bunch of articles about how, somewhat contrary to intuition, it's usually faster to fly with the rotation of the earth versus against it. All the answers have to do with wind and ...
0
votes
1answer
66 views

Would a plane get lighter if dry ice is inside and it sublimes during the flight?

During a series of comments here, it was suggested that taking dry ice into an airplane, the airplane gets lighter as the ice sublimes. This was supported by the idea that when the dry-ice sublimes ...
-2
votes
2answers
72 views

Flow over Airplane Wings

I recently read this from Wikipedia in an article discussing lift. A fluid flowing over the surface of a body exerts a force on it. It makes no difference whether the fluid is flowing past a ...
15
votes
4answers
735 views

Can you “rewind” sound messages by going supersonic? [duplicate]

I was having a discussion with a friend about supersonic flights. It was then when he proposed an idea on an interesting experiment that can be done during a supersonic flight. The experiment goes ...
0
votes
1answer
158 views

I'm confused about the aerodynamics of a gas turbine compressor blade of a jet engine?

I have a few questions here- Why do you need an increase in static pressure, why not total pressure? The rotor vane increase total energy, is this energy converted into kinetic energy or total ...
-2
votes
1answer
48 views

Could you build a “space tunnel system”? [closed]

With the limitation of fuel that can be taken on a space craft, would it make sense to build a propulsion system in space instead? For example via rings that are aligned very well and are positioned ...
1
vote
0answers
22 views

Cold airplane window frame

I was flying from Asia to Europe and noticed that the bottom of the window frame was ice cold while the top was warm. Why? My theory: The sunlight warming the air between the "inner window" and the "...
0
votes
1answer
18 views

Is Gyroscopic precession relative to the object in precessions axis of movement when there is drag imposed on the disc?

Does my question make sense? I am referring to the disc of an AutoGyro aircraft. Though the fuselage of a modern pusher AutoGyro will weather vane into the wind, the disc that provides lift does not. ...
0
votes
0answers
43 views

Why does air speed up when it gets squeezed?

When air flows across the top of a wing it flows faster becuase of the shape of the air foil and the air above it can't get out if the way in time so it gets squeezed and constricted. So it speeds up. ...
1
vote
0answers
65 views

Why does a car need so much power to get to a given speed compared to an aircraft?

This question has been bothering me for a long time because it seems like it should be obvious, but I can't figure it out. Excuse me if I'm being dumb. Why does a car require so much more power then ...
-2
votes
1answer
142 views

If Earth is curve and spinning, why plane flying in high altitude does not delayed?

If earth is spinning globe then the layer of athmosphere have a different tangential velocity for different altitude. For near the ground (solid surface of the earth) then the velocity of the air just ...
1
vote
0answers
230 views

What are the 3 Euler angles?

I am currently reading up on inertial measurement in aircraft systems. Euler angles are one of the concepts I am a bit confused with. In an Euler angle-rate matrix there seem to be 3 parameters: p, q, ...
2
votes
0answers
66 views

Why don't aircrafts spin their wheels before landing? [closed]

I had this thought when I was on the aircraft when it landed in the runway. It made lots of smoke and all sorts of vibrations, you know. When I enquired about it, I came to know that the landing part ...
0
votes
4answers
850 views

Does a pilot have to take into consideration the angular spin velocity of the earth?

First imagine a pilot takes off from a North South runway situated on a specific northern latitude, the circumference of which is 888 miles, where the angular spin velocity of the earth (and the plane)...
0
votes
0answers
59 views

Flight dynamics learning resources

I'm an engineer in the space sector working primarily with software but will be working with flight dynamics soon (I have a theoretical physics background, and not aerospace engineering). This was ...
2
votes
1answer
286 views

Reynolds number and shapes of airfoils

$$\mathrm{Re} = \frac{\rho \cdot v \cdot c}{\mu}$$ Where $\rho$ is the pressure, $v$ the velocity relative to the airflow, $c$ the chord of the airfoil and $\mu$ the air density. Does that mean that ...
1
vote
1answer
274 views

Why biplanes are not used in modern high speed aircrafts? [closed]

Explain why the high speed and commercial air crafts are monoplanes why not biplanes?
2
votes
1answer
154 views

Why does a tail make a kite more stable?

I have looking online to find answer to this question and one answer said that the tail increases drag and weight but, it did not say why the Increase in drag makes the kite stable. One theory I have ...
1
vote
3answers
324 views

Why Jet fighters don't heat up like spacecrafts?

After reading the answers to this question: After what speed air friction starts to heat up an object? I understood that the compression of gas is what generates heat that we see when a spacecraft or ...
1
vote
1answer
1k views

Why does an increase in angle of attack cause the boundary layer to slow down?

From what I understand when the angle of attack of a wing is increased enough the boundary layer air slows down. Eventually the air starts moving backwards and a separation bubble occurs. Why does the ...
0
votes
1answer
575 views

Ion Wind Thruster? What is the theory behind it?

I am 18 and I am a university student studying aerospace engineering. While I am looking up Elon Musk's Electric jet plane I found this http://inhabitat.com/mit-developing-ionic-wind-thrusters-as-...
0
votes
1answer
75 views

Wouldn't the air accelerating over the top of the wing push the wing forward(thrust)

A wing accelerates air on top of itself. Does this cause any forward thrust? I would think so because the air is accelerating backwards which should create an equal and opposite reaction forward.
-5
votes
3answers
8k views

Why does NASA need an aircraft model flying over a flat and nonrotating earth?

On the NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS) there's an article titled Derivation and definition of a linear aircraft model: Abstract A linear aircraft model for a rigid aircraft of constant ...