Linked Questions

6
votes
1answer
414 views

Does the temperature of a body depend on the frame of reference? [duplicate]

Does the temperature of a body depend on the frame of reference?
-1
votes
2answers
42 views

Motion at absolute 0 in relative to [duplicate]

Hypothetically, if we could get some type of particle to be at absolute 0 would it be technically still have relative motion due to an observer outside of earth. E.g earth is moving therefor particle ...
0
votes
0answers
72 views

Is there any change in temperature due to special relativity? [duplicate]

Say I am travelling in a spaceship very close to the speed of light. Would there be any change in temperature in the spaceship relative to outside the spaceship? Please explain in detail.
0
votes
1answer
46 views

Is internal energy frame-dependent? [duplicate]

In the realm of kinetic theory of gases, the internal energy of gas is solely due to the sum of kinetic energies of all particles, since kinetic energy is frame dependent I was thinking whether a ...
1
vote
0answers
32 views

Heat energy in special theory of relativity [duplicate]

Is heat energy invariant under Lorentz transformation? If so then how?
25
votes
6answers
3k views

Paradox regarding phase transitions in relativistic systems

The main question I would like to ask is whether quantities such as density are dependent on the frame of reference. I have searched several forums and the answer is somewhat controversial. Some ...
19
votes
5answers
2k views

0 Kelvin body moving

As many books say: Temperature is (proportional, almost, etc...) average kinetic energy of particles. My question is this. "Suppose there is a body somewhere in empty space which moves at ...
18
votes
7answers
1k views

Relativity of temperature paradox

The imagined scenario: Part A: From special relativity we know that velocity is a relative physical quantity, that is, it is dependent on the frame of reference of choice. This means that kinetic ...
16
votes
1answer
2k views

Why isn't temperature frame dependent?

In (non-relativistic) classical physics, if the temperature of an object is proportional to the average kinetic energy ${1 \over 2} m\overline {v^{2}}$of its particles (or molecules), then shouldn't ...
2
votes
2answers
2k views

Why does a Lorentz scalar field transform as $U^{-1}(\Lambda)\phi(x)U(\Lambda) = \phi(\Lambda^{-1}x)$?

This problem is from Srednicki page 19. Why $U^{-1}(\Lambda)\phi(x)U(\Lambda) = \phi(\Lambda^{-1}x)$? Can anyone derive this? $\phi$ is a scalar and $\Lambda$ Lorentz transformation.
6
votes
1answer
728 views

Is the entropy a Lorentz invariant?

So this is the pure question that came into my mind right now. Is the entropy a Lorentz invariant? How does the entropy of a gas behaves, when for example it's accelerated at $v = \frac{c}{2}$ or ...
3
votes
1answer
267 views

From a particle's point of view is his temperature absolute zero

Since the vibration of the particles is what cause temperature and a particle from its own point of view is not moving, is its temperature 0°K from its own point of view? Is there a thing like ...
2
votes
2answers
115 views

Invariance of Temperature in Classical Physics

How can we explain that Temperature is a classically frame-independent quantity to high school kids?
4
votes
0answers
153 views

What happens to the observed thermal energy of objects at relativistic speeds?

When an object is observed to move near the speed of light, what difference in thermal energy is observed? Does time dilation imply that it's colder?
1
vote
0answers
185 views

Redo the experiment 'Reversal of thermodynamic arrow of time'

In a recent paper "Reversing the thermodynamic arrow of time using quantum correlations" by Micadei et al, an experiment was carried out to show a reversal of time. Basically they prepare a mixed ...

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