Linked Questions

0
votes
0answers
40 views

Renormalization group and counterterms [duplicate]

While regularizing Feynman diagrams, we first isolate its divergent parts and then add counter terms to the Lagrangian in order to subtract out the divergent parts and render the amplitudes finite. So,...
25
votes
1answer
3k views

Difference between regularization and renormalization?

In quantum field theory we have the concepts of regularization and renormalization. I'm a little confused about these two. In my understanding regularization is a way to make divergent integrals ...
25
votes
1answer
2k views

Regulator-scheme-independence in QFT

Are there general conditions (preservation of symmetries for example) under which after regularization and renormalization in a given renormalizable QFT, results obtained for physical quantities are ...
10
votes
1answer
2k views

Divergent bare parameters/couplings: what is the physical meaning of it? Do this have any relation with wilson's renormalization group approach?

I understand that bare parameters in the Lagrangian are different from the physical one that you measure in an experiment. I'm wondering if the fact that they are divergent has any physical meaning? ...
22
votes
1answer
2k views

What's the relation between Wilson Renormalization Group (RG) in Statistical Mechanics and QFT RG?

What's the relation between Wilson Renormalization Group(RG) in Statistical Mechanics and QFT RG? For easier to compare, I choose scalar $\phi^4$ in both cases. Wilson RG: Given $\phi^4$ model, $$Z=...
10
votes
1answer
451 views

Why can consistent QFTs only arise from CFTs?

This is claimed by Jared Kaplan in his Lectures on AdS/CFT from the Bottom Up. He writes: It seems that all QFTs can be viewed as points along an Renormalization Flow (or RG flow, this is the ...
8
votes
3answers
787 views

Are the bare parameters of a renormalizable field theory infinitesimal or infinite?

I think this should be an easy question. Several sources I've read say that the bare parameters in a quantum field theory are "infinite" so that the renormalized values are "finite". However, in ...
16
votes
2answers
1k views

Quantum field theories with asymptotic freedom

QCD is the best-known example of theories with negtive beta function, i.e., coupling constant decreases when increasing energy scale. I have two questions about it: (1) Are there other theories with ...
4
votes
2answers
738 views

Meaning of perturbative and non-perturbative renormalizability

What is meant by a theory to be (1) perturbatively renormalizable, (2) perturbatively non-renormalizable, (3) non-perturbatively renormalizable, and non-perturbatively non-renormalizable? In each case,...
19
votes
1answer
678 views

Understanding the $\phi^4$ phase diagram

I'm having trouble making sense of this phase diagram. The model is a $V(\phi)=g_2 \phi^2+g_4\phi^4$ scalar field theory. Here's what I think I understand: the capital letters represent different ...
5
votes
1answer
129 views

In what way do non-rigorous arguments make sense? [closed]

I specifically have in mind arguments made in QFT textbooks in mind. There are no rigorous foundations for QFT, at least not any that can reproduce the predictions of the Standard Model. In fact, ...
2
votes
1answer
149 views

Subtraction scheme invariance in QFT

I'm currently reading Schwartz's QFT text and I'm confused on how observables are supposed to be independent of subtraction schemes. In the text it seems that the renormalized loop diagrams are ...
2
votes
0answers
60 views

Observable which dependes on the cutoff

In arXiv:0710.4330v1 Balitsky calculate the eikonal scattering of dipole composed of quark anti-quark, $Tr(U_{x}U^{\dagger}_{y})$, to NLO accuracy. The result he found is: Where $\mu$ is the ...