Linked Questions

0
votes
1answer
295 views

Why do mirrors look “gray”? [duplicate]

Or any other silver surface? Perfect silver "colour" just seems to be "reflecting gray", so something that absorbs all wavelengths by the same fraction and reflects everything else specularly. When I ...
1
vote
0answers
67 views

How is gold (the element) gold (the color)? [duplicate]

This question is related to the inquiry here: What enables protons to give new properties to an atom every time one is added? and here: What causes atoms to have their specific colors? In general, ...
50
votes
2answers
7k views

Why are gold mirrors yellow?

Why are golden mirrors yellow? Do they add a yellow component to the spectrum or absorb non-yellow components? If they absorb, then why are they used in telescopes being imperfect? If they add a ...
13
votes
2answers
2k views

What is the source for Osmium's colour?

The majority of metals are known for appearing grey to our eyes, cf. e.g. Why are most metals gray/silver? But the main exceptions to this are the "famous" group eleven metals, where their distinctive ...
-2
votes
3answers
7k views

Is there 100% reflective mirror…i just want one

I have heard there are none right now...but i saw something that said something about 100% reflection. Forgotten completely. sorry. I want it, i think it'd be very amazing to save sunlight in it from ...
5
votes
1answer
3k views

Why do most metals appear silver in color with gold being an exception from a scattering and EM viewpoint?

Related: Why are most metals gray/silver? After reading Johannes’ impressive answer to Ali Abbasinasab question of why do most metals appear silver in color with the exception of gold (and copper), ...
5
votes
2answers
933 views

Principle of Reflection on atomic level

This well-observed phenomenon has, besides several others, always been a fascination to me. We are well aware of several theories, experiments, and practical applications of this well-known phenomenon,...
5
votes
6answers
1k views

What about a surface determines its color?

Light falls on a surface. Some wavelengths get absorbed. The other are reflected. The reflected ones are the colors that we perceive to be of the surface. What is the property that determines, what ...
0
votes
1answer
659 views

Why are metals opaque? [closed]

Why are metals opaque? Is it due to the free electrons in a metal or a material's intrinsic properties?
3
votes
1answer
559 views

Why does silver have such a strong UV resonance compared to other metals?

Related: Why did high quality mirrors use aluminum coatings instead of silver? After reading Chris White’s and LDC3’s comments in the above related link, it got me wondering about silver’s atomic ...
-2
votes
1answer
543 views

Electromagnetic waves in a perfect conductor [closed]

What happens when an electromagnetic wave strikes a perfect conductor at normal incidence? Is the wave transmitted or reflected through the conductor?
3
votes
1answer
182 views

Why are some elemental materials grey?

How does grey occur in elemental materials such as metals? I believe that grey arises from the simultaneous reflection and absorption of all colors of the spectrum (in different atoms of course), as ...
1
vote
1answer
611 views

Can electrons reflect light?

Lately, I have been watching sparks while connecting my electronic devices and I can notice that electricity is kind of blue, and theoretically it's blue because it reflects blue wavelengths?? And ...
4
votes
1answer
202 views

Why does roughened silver look gray while paper white?

Looking at reflectance spectrum of silver, given e.g. here, we can say that more than about $95\%$ of light is reflected by silver. Similarly for white notebook paper, the spectrum is given here, and ...
1
vote
1answer
136 views

Few questions about the physical basis of metals colours?

I have a few questions about physical origins of metals colours: 1. What determines the colour of the metal (eg. yellow gold, rust-red copper and silvery colour of most metals)? I read on Wikipedia ...

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