Linked Questions

27 votes
2 answers
3k views

Could the randomness of quantum mechanics be the result of unseen factors? [duplicate]

The possibility of randomness in physics doesnt particularly bother me, but contemplating the possibility that quarks might be made up of something even smaller, just in general, leads me to think ...
J.Todd's user avatar
  • 1,811
11 votes
3 answers
2k views

Predicting the future [duplicate]

In the special theory of relativity, each event is a point in 4d spacetime. And we can represent our life as a world line in the spacetime. Then, if we somehow find out the mathematical equation of ...
Gurbir Singh's user avatar
3 votes
6 answers
1k views

Is radioactive decay deterministic? [duplicate]

Suppose you know at time $t$ that there is some atomic nucleus that radioactively decays. If you were to magically roll back the universe to the exact same state and let it continue as per usual ...
Water's user avatar
  • 185
7 votes
3 answers
715 views

True randomness? [duplicate]

I am a physics high-school student so my knowledge is not very deep on the subject. We started learnning about quantum mechanics and on some processes that my teacher described as random. I began to ...
user3917631's user avatar
1 vote
5 answers
548 views

Could the universe be accurately simulated with an infinitely powerful computer? [duplicate]

This would mean that every event happens because of what has hapened before it and there is no randomness factor. At a microscopic level, the motion of atoms is a result of the motion of other atoms ...
Creator's user avatar
  • 35
2 votes
1 answer
944 views

Deterministic universe for dummies [duplicate]

Is there a general consensus about whether the universe is deterministic? Is it still up in the air? I have attempted to read other physics.stackexchange answers and do some independent research, but ...
temetvince's user avatar
3 votes
0 answers
3k views

Are radioactive decays truly random? [duplicate]

By truly random I mean that IF we knew the position and velocity of every particle in radioactive isotope, could we predict when the decay would happen?
Jan's user avatar
  • 51
0 votes
5 answers
1k views

Is there consensus among physicists that reality is fundamentally deterministic? [duplicate]

Does Heisenberg’s Uncertainty Principle mean that the universe cannot deterministically be predicted by observers, or does it mean that the universe is inherently indeterministic, meaning that the ...
Peter Jordanson's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
573 views

Quantum physics and determinism [duplicate]

According to classical physics if we know space-time coordinates of every atom in the universe, we can predict the future. But quantum physics introduced probability throwing determinism out of ...
siva phanindra Daggubati's user avatar
3 votes
3 answers
234 views

Why can’t quantum randomness be understood as epistemic? [duplicate]

I often hear people say that quantum randomness is “true randomness”, but I don’t really understand it. Please bear with my question. Before the development of quantum physics, randomness is ...
J Li's user avatar
  • 131
0 votes
1 answer
311 views

Do physicists accept true randomness in nature? [duplicate]

I am not a physicist but I've started studying the subject and noticed that terms like "random", "randomness", "randomly" are widely used when talking about nature. For example, random movement of ...
Scarlain Stimolon's user avatar
0 votes
3 answers
322 views

Can universe or anything be simulated with absolute accuracy? [duplicate]

In a simulation everything is known which makes any apparent random event a pre-calculated event. Taking that into account is it possible to simulate the universe with absolute accuracy in a way that ...
SMUsamaShah's user avatar
  • 5,357
2 votes
3 answers
234 views

Does non-local hidden variable theory predict the outcome of an experiment? [duplicate]

I am trying to understand what decides the outcome of an experiment and if there is any theory (e.g. non-local hidden variable theory) that is able to predict the outcome.
Rajaram Venkataramani's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
157 views

Does the human brain use random number generators? [duplicate]

Neurons fire depending on the impulses they get from other neurons. This seems to be 'deterministic'. However, sometimes it might be useful to use random processes instead. Does the human brain have ...
Riemann's user avatar
  • 1,440
0 votes
2 answers
155 views

If we were to know everything about the universe right after the Big Bang, can we predict me eating toast today? [duplicate]

It is implied, per QM, that the behavior of subatomic particles cannot be precisely predicted. However, these indeterministic effects do have defined probabilities. By the law of large numbers, they ...
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