Linked Questions

1
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0answers
33 views

Nuclear orbitals for nucleons [duplicate]

I'm currently taking a nuclear physics class, and of course, earlier courses taught me how electrons "moves" in orbits around the nucleus. In that case, it is their wave function that is spread out in ...
21
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2answers
4k views

Are protons and neutrons affected by the Pauli Exclusion Principle?

I'm very confused about the Pauli exclusion principle. Wikipedia states it as "two identical fermions cannot occupy the same quantum state in a quantum system". I understand this for electrons that ...
17
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3answers
1k views

Are nucleons discrete within a nucleus?

When nucleons are bound within a nucleus and undergoing meson exchange, are the nucleons still discrete, or is the concept of a nucleon lost within a nucleus, and a nucleus is closer to a sea of ...
37
votes
1answer
2k views

Why are pear-shaped nuclei possible?

In a recent question, Ben Crowell raised an observation which really puzzled me. I obtained a partial answer by looking in the literature, but I would like to know if it's on the right track, and a ...
13
votes
1answer
2k views

What is an intuitive picture of the motion of nucleons?

I understand the "motion" of electrons within an ordinary atom (say argon at room temperature and pressure). They are moving in "orbits" defined by quantum mechanical wavefunctions where the "orbits" ...
6
votes
2answers
1k views

Evidence that nuclei contain neutrons and protons (other than nucleons appearing if a nucleus is smashed)?

This may seem like a silly question, but I believe this to be very fundamental because the Standard Model of particle physics seems based on the axiom or assumption that neutrons and protons exist “as-...
5
votes
2answers
2k views

Energy conservation in radioactive decay

To show my current understanding, I'll use alpha decay as an example and list my questions at the end. Could you please correct me if I'm wrong. An alpha particle forms in the parent nucleus. It's ...
3
votes
2answers
963 views

How does gamma ray emission make an atom more stable? [duplicate]

One of the types of radioactive emissions is gamma emission. I understand how the other two types, alpha and beta, help to make the atom more stable. How exactly does gamma emission help to make the ...
1
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1answer
162 views

In the Pound Rebka Experiment, how were the gamma rays generated?

Lest my question be dismissed as poorly-worded, let me first say that I do understand the concept of how a gamma ray is emitted when an electron in an excited (higher energy) state transitions to a ...
1
vote
1answer
62 views

Different kinds of the same isotope

I apologize if this is an obvious question, but I can't find the answer anywhere. In this page: http://ie.lbl.gov/education/parent/U_iso.htm are listed the isotopes of Uranium. Some of them, for ...
1
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0answers
77 views

Do all particles have radiative transitions?

Everybody knows that excited electrons can emit photons upon relaxation. A nucleus too (which is not an elementary particle), can be in an excited state and emit gamma rays upon relaxation: (source) ...