Linked Questions

2
votes
1answer
1k views

Is there a fundamental relationship between Coulomb's law and Newton's Law of Gravitation? [duplicate]

It seems like the two equations are identical indicates that there is something more going on that unites them both, maybe in a cool way or something. Why are these two laws so similar?
134
votes
7answers
172k views

How do moving charges produce magnetic fields?

I'm tutoring high school students. I've always taught them that: A charged particle moving without acceleration produces an electric as well as a magnetic field. It produces an electric field ...
17
votes
8answers
10k views

How does Newtonian gravitation conflict with special relativity?

In the Wikipedia article Classical Field Theory (Gravitation), it says After Newtonian gravitation was found to be inconsistent with special relativity, . . . I don't see how Newtonian gravitation ...
26
votes
3answers
4k views

Why is there no gravitational magnetic field? (Or, is there?)

We can think that the electric field and the gravitational field operate similarly in the sense that the forms of their governing laws (namely, Coulomb's law and Newton's law respectively) are ...
10
votes
2answers
4k views

Noticing that Newtonian gravity and electrostatics are equivalent, is there also a relationship between the general relativity and electrodynamics?

In classical mechanics, we had Newton's law of gravity $F \propto \frac{Mm}{r^2}$. Because of this, all laws of classical electrostatics applied to classical gravity if we assumed that all charges ...
7
votes
4answers
2k views

Can Newton’s law of gravitation be derived from Coulomb’s law? [duplicate]

I’m casually learning physics and have noticed that Newton’s law of gravitation and the electrostatic force formulas look similar. I’ve asked this question before but would really appreciate another ...
20
votes
2answers
2k views

Is Newton's universal gravitational constant the inverse of permittivity of mass in vacuum?

Is it possible to consider Newton's universal gravitational constant, $G$, as inverse of vacuum permittivity of mass? $$\epsilon_m=\frac {1}{4\pi G}$$ if so, then vacuum permeability of mass will be:...
-1
votes
1answer
2k views

What is the difference between an electric field and gravitational field? [duplicate]

Since the electrostatic field and the Newtonian gravitational field share a similar form: proportional to $$ \frac{1}{r^2} $$ Is there any qualitative difference between motions under the ...
-1
votes
2answers
280 views

What conservation law is implied by the symmetry between Newton's law of gravitation and Coulomb's law?

My question relates to Noether's theorem, which I've recently been reading about, and I couldn't find any good answers on the internet relating a conservation law to the symmetry between Newton's law ...
3
votes
0answers
433 views

Can a Set of “Maxwell's Equations” for Newtonian Gravitation be Derived from Newton's Force + Special Relativity?

When I learned about electromagnetism in my first year of undergraduate school, Maxwell's equations were derived roughly in the following way (see also here or in [1]): Gauss's law for a static ...
0
votes
0answers
33 views

Similarity in the formula of gravitational force and electrostatic force [duplicate]

The gravitational force between two masses is given by: $$\vec{F_g}=G\frac{m_1m_2}{r^2}$$ and the electrostatic force between two charged particles by: $$\vec{F_e}=k\frac{q_1q_2}{r^2}$$ Both the ...