Linked Questions

7
votes
4answers
3k views

Can Newton’s law of gravitation be derived from Coulomb’s law? [duplicate]

I’m casually learning physics and have noticed that Newton’s law of gravitation and the electrostatic force formulas look similar. I’ve asked this question before but would really appreciate another ...
4
votes
2answers
5k views

Why inverse square not inverse cube law? [duplicate]

So as I understand, the inverse-square law which shows up in a variety of physical laws (Newton's universal law of gravitation, Coulomb's law, etc.) is a mathematical consequence of point-like ...
0
votes
1answer
1k views

Why do fields decrease with distance? [duplicate]

For example, electric, gravitational field decreases with $1/r^2$. Is it like decrease of energy of an object when goes it is moving with friction/air drag etc? Does it mean that field's strength is ...
2
votes
1answer
527 views

What is the significance of the Inverse-square law? [duplicate]

Considering its occurrences in various fields like Electrostatics, Gravitation, Acoustics etc. how does the law bind these topics together?
2
votes
2answers
304 views

The inverse square law [duplicate]

Why the nature has chosen the inverse square law. For instance, the gravitational force as well as the Coulomb force is inversely proportional to the square of distances. Why not these forces are ...
2
votes
1answer
226 views

Gauss theorem and inverse square law [duplicate]

I know that the gauss law states that the Flux of the electric field through a closed surface is Q/ε , but does the gauss theorem works also for non inverse square law Fields?
0
votes
1answer
150 views

why is exchange force inversely proportional to square of distance? [duplicate]

Gravitational force is inversely proportional to the square of distance. Coulomb's force is inversely proportional to the square of distance. By biot savart law, magnetic field is inversely ...
1
vote
1answer
87 views

Is there an underlying reason why some forces are inversely proportional to the square of the distance? [duplicate]

This is the first time I'm studying those subjects (I'm still in high school) and my teacher couldn't give me an answer. I'm referring specially to Newton's law of gravitation and Coulomb's law of ...
2
votes
1answer
75 views

Is there a higher-level reason why $\nabla\cdot(\hat{\bf r}/r^2) = 0$ in three dimensions but not two? [duplicate]

I am working through Griffiths, Introduction to Electrodynamics, and finding the divergence of the electric field generated by a single charge sitting at the origin. $$\mathbf{E}(\mathbf{r}) = \frac{\...
0
votes
0answers
33 views

Similarity in the formula of gravitational force and electrostatic force [duplicate]

The gravitational force between two masses is given by: $$\vec{F_g}=G\frac{m_1m_2}{r^2}$$ and the electrostatic force between two charged particles by: $$\vec{F_e}=k\frac{q_1q_2}{r^2}$$ Both the ...
71
votes
6answers
6k views

Does Coulomb's Law, with Gauss's Law, imply the existence of only three spatial dimensions?

Coulomb's Law states that the fall-off of the strength of the electrostatic force is inversely proportional to the distance squared of the charges. Gauss's law implies that a the total flux through a ...
12
votes
5answers
2k views

Intuitive explanation of the inverse square power $\frac{1}{r^2}$ in Newton's law of gravity

Is there an intuitive explanation why it is plausible that the gravitational force which acts between two point masses is proportional to the inverse square of the distance $r$ between the masses (and ...
3
votes
4answers
23k views

The relation between Gauss's law and Coulomb law and why is it important that the electric field decrease proportionally to $\frac{1}{r^{2}}$?

My question relates to the third MIT's video lecture about Electricity and Magnetism, specifically from $21:18-22:00$ : http://youtu.be/XaaP1bWFjDA?t=21m18s I have watched the development of Gauss's ...
11
votes
2answers
616 views

A change in the gravitational law

What would happen if the force of gravitation suddenly starts varying as $1$$/$$r^3$ instead of $1/r^2$ ? Would the symmetry of universe now seen be disrupted?
2
votes
2answers
4k views

Why is Gravitational force proportional to the masses?.

We know that two mass particles attract each other with a force $$F~=~\frac{G M_1 M_2}{r^2}.$$ But what is the reason behind that? Why does this happen?

15 30 50 per page