Linked Questions

26
votes
7answers
9k views

Why do neutrons repel each other?

I can understand why 2 protons will repel each other, because they're both positive. But there isn't a neutral charge is there? So why do neutrons repel? (Do they, or have I been misinformed?) The ...
21
votes
2answers
4k views

Are protons and neutrons affected by the Pauli Exclusion Principle?

I'm very confused about the Pauli exclusion principle. Wikipedia states it as "two identical fermions cannot occupy the same quantum state in a quantum system". I understand this for electrons that ...
10
votes
5answers
13k views

How can the nucleus of an atom be in an excited state?

An example of the nucleus of an atom being in an excited state is the Hoyle State, which was a theory devised by the Astronomer Fred Hoyle to help describe the vast quantities of carbon-12 present in ...
20
votes
3answers
4k views

Are the protons and neutrons in the nucleus arranged in any particular way?

I was wondering this: suppose you have two oxygen atoms. They will both have 8 protons and 8 neutrons in the nucleus (at least if they are the most common isotope). Now, will all those particles be ...
6
votes
2answers
1k views

Evidence that nuclei contain neutrons and protons (other than nucleons appearing if a nucleus is smashed)?

This may seem like a silly question, but I believe this to be very fundamental because the Standard Model of particle physics seems based on the axiom or assumption that neutrons and protons exist “as-...
5
votes
1answer
1k views

What are the average matter, antimatter, and binding energy composition of protons and neutrons?

For a free baryon at rest at room temperature, how much of its ~1Gev (rest) mass can (on average) be considered as matter, as antimatter, and as binding energy? For a baryon in a nucleus, I assume ...
4
votes
2answers
958 views

Is there an equation for the residual strong nuclear force?

First of all, note the qualifier "residual". The present question is not the same as that asked, and answered, in the StackExchange question "Is there an equation for the strong nuclear force?" which ...
0
votes
1answer
2k views

Does nucleus itself has its own motion?

We know that electron(s) is(are) moving around the nucleus, that consists of protons and neutrons. But does nucleus itself has its own motion, its own momentum, or the nucleus is stationary? Now, is ...
4
votes
1answer
149 views

$\alpha$ decay to more than one nuclear state

I do not understand how $\alpha$ decay can be a probabilistic process such that there are multiple products from the decay. For example: $^{241}\mathrm{Cm}$ decays to the excited states of $^{237}\...
4
votes
1answer
148 views

Where can I get the most accurate measurements of parton distribution functions?

Where would I look to get the most accurate experimental values of parton distribution functions for the proton? I know these functions aren't measured directly, but I'd basically like to find a fit ...
0
votes
1answer
67 views

Spatial configuration of quarks?

Is there anything known about the spatial configuration of the quarks within a proton of pion? Or are they just considered to be two or three overlapping points?
0
votes
0answers
74 views

The Internal Structure of A Nucleon [duplicate]

Just like, in a Bohr model, the atom has a particular structure, what is it like inside of a nucleon? Like, are there particular ways the quarks are arranged, and what about the binding energy that ...
1
vote
0answers
44 views

Nuclear structure [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Are the protons and neutrons in the nucleus arranged in any particular way? Isotopes have different numbers of neutrons. Essentially my question is: how does the addition of ...
1
vote
0answers
33 views

Nuclear orbitals for nucleons [duplicate]

I'm currently taking a nuclear physics class, and of course, earlier courses taught me how electrons "moves" in orbits around the nucleus. In that case, it is their wave function that is spread out in ...