Linked Questions

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2answers
4k views

Can the lift generated by a helicopter be justified using Bernoulli theorem? [duplicate]

When the shaft of the helicopter rotates, it creates a low pressure. Because of the low pressure, the helicopter lifts. Is my understanding that this is just an application of Bernoulli's theorem?
2
votes
4answers
417 views

How a faster air flow creates a lower air pressure on an airplane wing? [duplicate]

An airplane wing creates a faster air flow on the upper side and slower air flow on the lower side. Pressure of a gas and the speed of the gas molecules are directly related. If the speed of molecules ...
1
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2answers
2k views

What's wrong with this argument that aerodynamic lift really does rely on Bernoulli? [duplicate]

There is a grade-school explanation of how a wing works that goes approximately like this (although I'm leaving out an erroneous bit): Because of the geometry of the way the wing meets the air, air ...
1
vote
1answer
401 views

Do airplane wings use difference in pressure to generate lift or conservation of momentum? [duplicate]

I hope this is a physics topic. I thought it may be appropriate because of conservation of momentum. I was under the impression that lift in an airplane wing ( an airfoil ) was due to difference in ...
0
votes
1answer
537 views

Equal Transit Time Fallacy [duplicate]

I learned, in grade school, that lift was generated via the particles on either side of the wing having to reach the other end at the same time. Looking back, that indeed has no physicality to it. So ...
2
votes
1answer
308 views

I read a book saying bernoulli's flight equations didn't have as much impact on lift as most people think [duplicate]

I'm a computer scientist that likes to read about math and physics occasionally. A local author at a nearby aviation center brought bernoulli's flight equations into question. It was clear enough ...
2
votes
3answers
369 views

How does the lift force of an airplane work? [duplicate]

At first I thought that the lift force of an airplane wing came from the buoyant force of the air. Thus we can calculate it's lift force using $$ F_b={\rho}gV$$ However, that does not seem to be ...
0
votes
1answer
119 views

Flow turning — air flow [duplicate]

Why is the pressure on the inside of air flow curvature considered be low pressure and it is considered to be high pressure above? I read and seen videos that this is the case but I want to know why. ...
1
vote
0answers
100 views

How does this help an aeroplane to fly? [duplicate]

I read it somewhere on the internet that wings of an aeroplane are designed in such a way, that they increase the velocity of air above the wings and so pressure above the plane becomes less than the ...
1
vote
0answers
99 views

Why air above airplane's wing moves faster? [duplicate]

One explanation I read: Because of the wing's geometry, the "upper" side of the wing is longer, so the air has to travel faster: My wondering: Who said (and what was his/her explanation) that air ...
1
vote
0answers
49 views

How is pressure reduced on the upper part of an aircrafts wing? [duplicate]

I have heard part of the explanation and that is that air on the top part of the aircrafts wing wants to move in a straight line, but the air is pulled down the slope or camber, but that's as far as I ...
0
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0answers
33 views

Fluid Dynamics applied to Aircraft wings [duplicate]

On aircraft wings, the bottom is flat and the top is curved. I know this benefits the aircraft by producing lift, but I wish to understand how. I'm told it has something to do with how fluids behave.
0
votes
0answers
28 views

What is a simple, effective, and physically consistent explanation of Bernoulli's principle (in the context of airfoil lift)? [duplicate]

I am not here to continue any debate about what really allows airplanes to fly. Rather, what I am looking for is an informed, thoughtful, illuminating and self-contained explanation of Bernoulli's ...
0
votes
0answers
27 views

how to explain the upright force for the plane? [duplicate]

I remember in the high school physics, my teacher told us that the design of the plane wing is because we want the air above the wing flowing faster than the air flowing below so the pressure above ...
32
votes
13answers
3k views

What does a wing do that an engine can't?

This isn't a question of how a wing works -- vortex flow, Bernoulli's principle, all of that jazz. Instead, it's a question of why we need a wing at all. A wing produces lift, but why is that ...

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