Linked Questions

2 votes
0 answers
99 views

Now that gravitational waves have been discovered, what does their particle version look like? [duplicate]

Duality dictates that gravitational waves should have a particle counterpart too, right? Will this in any way help solve the big problem of quantum gravity?
Ankita Shandilya's user avatar
116 votes
9 answers
64k views

What is the relation between electromagnetic wave and photon?

At the end of this nice video (https://youtu.be/XiHVe8U5PhU?t=10m27s), she says that electromagnetic wave is a chain reaction of electric and magnetic fields creating each other so the chain of wave ...
Xtro's user avatar
  • 1,671
28 votes
3 answers
4k views

Does theoretical physics suggest that gravity is the exchange of gravitons or deformation/bending of spacetime?

Throughout my life, I have always been taught that gravity is a simple force, however now I struggle to see that being strictly true. Hence I wanted to ask what modern theoretical physics suggests ...
steve_just_steve's user avatar
11 votes
4 answers
7k views

Does the existence (now proved) of gravitational waves imply the existence of Gravitons?

I studied the theoretical part about the Gravitational waves in General Relativity (linearization of gravity and small perturbations of the metric and so on). But I was wondering about: since ...
Les Adieux's user avatar
  • 3,705
5 votes
2 answers
497 views

What has general relativity got to do with special relativity?

What has general relativity got to do with special relativity? Arguably, special relativity is encompassed in the requirement that the dynamical laws of physics be Poincare invariant (as opposed to ...
Joshua Tilley's user avatar
0 votes
2 answers
382 views

Are GWs made of gravitons (are gravitons the quanta of GWs) or not?

I have read this question: What is the difference between gravitons and gravitational waves? I have read this on wikipedia: However, if gravitons are the quanta of gravitational waves, then ...
Árpád Szendrei's user avatar
2 votes
4 answers
489 views

Why can we detect single photons, but not single gravitons?

Everybody can buy a single photon counter. Why are there no single graviton counters? Obviously, graviton sources are rare. But why are graviton detectors so hard to make? Is it just because the ...
frauke's user avatar
  • 684
-1 votes
1 answer
290 views

Gravitons (real) passing through a black hole

This is not a duplicate. I do not ask about the gravitational field of the black hole, or why it extends farther out then the event horizon. I do understand that the gravitational field is described ...
Árpád Szendrei's user avatar
2 votes
2 answers
280 views

What really is GW quanta?

I have read this question: What is the difference between gravitons and gravitational waves? where annav says: So photons are the building blocks of light, and gravitons are (hopefully) the ...
Árpád Szendrei's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
125 views

Equivalence principle and gravitons

If gravitons exist, are they always detectible in any frame? I'm asking because if I'm in a freely falling frame in a uniform gravitational field, and I detect gravitons, I will no longer be able to ...
Ahmed Samir's user avatar
0 votes
2 answers
171 views

GR: why "background-independent" and not only "background-interacting"?

My question is closely related to the answer of this question: Why is general relativity background independent and electromagnetism is background dependent? General Relativity is often stated to be &...
MartyMcFly's user avatar