Linked Questions

8
votes
4answers
1k views

Why does electric field intensity $E$ can be uniquely determined by its divergence and curl? [duplicate]

My question is, the number of following equations $$\nabla\cdot E=\frac{\rho}{\varepsilon}$$ $$\nabla\times E=-\frac{\partial B}{\partial t}$$ is 4 while the number of unknown variables $E=(E_1,E_2,...
5
votes
1answer
225 views

Is the system of equations of electrostatics underdetermined or overdetermined? [duplicate]

The following equations are equations of electrostatics: $$\nabla \times \vec E=0$$ $$\nabla\cdot\vec E=\dfrac{\rho}{\epsilon_0}.$$ These are 4 independent equations, while $\vec E$ has only 3 ...
0
votes
0answers
33 views

Has really general relativity only two degrees of freedom (as in the Maxwell theory)? [duplicate]

i read in a "a first course on loop quantum gravity" written by Gambini that: "General relativity is invariant under spatial coordinate transformations. The constraint associated with ...
25
votes
3answers
8k views

Maxwell in multiple dimensions: What happens to curl?

I read this answer a while ago, and while thinking about $\nabla$, I realized something. Since the cross product can be written as a determinant, in higher dimensions we require extra vector inputs. ...
17
votes
3answers
7k views

How to derive Maxwell's equations from the electromagnetic Lagrangian?

In Heaviside-Lorentz units the Maxwell's equations are: $$\nabla \cdot \vec{E} = \rho $$ $$ \nabla \times \vec{B} - \frac{\partial \vec{E}}{\partial t} = \vec{J}$$ $$ \nabla \times \vec{E} + \frac{\...
32
votes
4answers
3k views

Can light exist in $2+1$ or $1+1$ spacetime dimensions?

Spacetime of special relativity is frequently illustrated with its spatial part reduced to one or two spatial dimension (with light sector or cone, respectively). Taken literally, is it possible for $...
28
votes
2answers
2k views

Basis for the Generalization of Physics to a Different Number of Dimensions

I am reading this really interesting book by Zwiebach called "A First Course in String Theory". Therein, he generalizes the laws of electrodynamics to the cases where dimensions are not 3+1. It's an ...
13
votes
2answers
2k views

Counting the number of propagating degrees of freedom in Lorenz Gauge Electrodynamics

How do I definitively show that there are only two propagating degrees of freedom in the Lorenz Gauge $\partial_\mu A^\mu=0$ in classical electrodynamics. I need an clear argument that involves the ...
4
votes
4answers
1k views

Why ONLY Maxwell's equations are the basic equations of electromagnetism?

In electromagnetism we say that all the electromagnetic interactions are governed by the 4 golden rules of Maxwell. But I want to know: is this(to assume that there is no requirement of any other rule)...
0
votes
3answers
5k views

Divergence equations (Maxwell)

Let $\mathbf{E}(r,t),\mathbf{B}(r,t)$ be two vector fields (in $\mathbb{R}^3$), s.t. they satisfy fot $t=0$ the equations: $\nabla \cdot \mathbf{B}(r,0)=0.$ $\nabla \cdot \mathbf{E}(r,0)=\frac{\rho(...
2
votes
1answer
568 views

Newton's theory of gravity is covariant under Galilean transformations

We know from classical mechanics that the gravitational field equation for the scalar potential takes the form $$\nabla^2\phi=4\pi \rho,$$ where $\rho$ is mass density (which, can depend on time and ...
7
votes
2answers
408 views

If $A^\mu$ is not determined uniquely by Maxwell's equations, what happens if we solve for it numerically?

Given a solution $A^{\mu}(x)$ to Maxwell's equations \begin{equation} \Box A^{\mu}(x)-\partial^{\mu}\partial_{\nu}A^{\nu}=0\tag{1} \end{equation} which also satisfies some specified initial conditions ...
2
votes
3answers
404 views

Maxwell's equations - underdetermined - uniqueness

Maxwell's equations can be seen as two dynamical equations (the two curl equations), and two constraint equations (the two divergence equations). So we have 6 unknowns ($E_x,E_y,E_z,B_x,B_y,B_z$). ...
3
votes
1answer
1k views

How many fundamental fields / constraints are in Maxwell's Equations?

I've seen electromagnetics formulated in the potentials ($\bf A$, $\varphi$) (and their magnetic counterparts) in the Lorenz gauge for a long time. Justifications for using these include that they ...
2
votes
3answers
279 views

A partial differential equation for a vector function and resulting constraint between its components

If we have an algebraic equation connecting 3-variables $x,y,z$, such as $x^2+y^2+z^2=2$, we can immediately conclude that all the 3 variabes are not independent. Now, consider the following Maxwell's ...

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