Linked Questions

-2
votes
1answer
658 views

What is the amplitude of the electron wave when it is orbiting nucleus?

We all know that electrons have wave properties and we can calculate the de Broglie wavelength. But what about the amplitude of the wave?
1
vote
4answers
278 views

Could an electron enter the nucleus, and if so would it be captured by a proton?

I've been trying to find an answer to this question, but have come across contradictory answers, and have limited knowledge of quantum mechanics myself. Almost all the threads (here and on Quora) ...
3
votes
1answer
208 views

What prevents the nucleus from wandering into the electron cloud?

I have seen the question about why the electrons don't fall into the nucleus, and I understand that completely. However, the converse of this question is very interesting as well: "What prevents the ...
1
vote
4answers
293 views

Does hidden variable quantum mechanics imply the collapse of atoms(electrons falling into the nucleus)?

why do atoms not collapse on themselves. Doesnt this problem rule hidden variables as invalid as the heisenburg uncertainty is the solution to the problem because it says electrons exist in a ...
1
vote
1answer
797 views

What force keeps electrons in their orbitals and not collapse into the positively charged nucleus? [duplicate]

I know about quantum mechanical model of an atom and how electrons behave like a standing waves and there isn't any lower level energy available for electrons below ground state energy and energy ...
2
votes
1answer
162 views

Can an electron be inside a proton?

This article has an image showing the 2S and 2P states of a hydrogen atom. The caption makes the following claim: The 2S and 2P states of hydrogen show where the electron could be found at any ...
5
votes
1answer
161 views

Why do electrons fall into the nucleus in Rutherford's model of the atom but not in Bohr's model?

In Rutherford's atomic model, an atom's nucleus can't survive because of the electromagnetic theory of Maxwell. But in Bohr's model it can survive. My question is: in both atomic models, electrons ...
-4
votes
2answers
158 views

An alternative explanation of electron distribution in a Hydrogen atom

So basically I have this idea, we can't see how does an electron really move because of its small size and the wavelength of light being comparatively being much larger. What if we took two spheres (...
1
vote
1answer
288 views

Bohr atomic model: does the electron fall?

I know this is a classical system, and thus not compliant with the quantum nature of real atoms. But please bare with me. I have heard this before: the orbiting electron should radiate in the ...
1
vote
2answers
224 views

Why are Nuclei stable and what do neutrons change there?

I am currently thinking about nuclear fission and realized that I forgot some basic facts I've learned (and understood... at least I thought so) some years ago in school. I know that electrons are ...
0
votes
1answer
163 views

Are transitions between stationary orbits part of the Bohr model? [closed]

The first assumption of the Bohr atomic model states that the electrons can only orbit stably, without radiating, in certain orbits (called by Bohr the "stationary orbits") at a certain discrete set ...
0
votes
1answer
127 views

Why don't protons collapse to a point?

If the quarks that make up the proton are point particles, and the forces binding them together is the strong force which is $137$ times stronger than the electromagnetic force (which makes the quarks ...
2
votes
3answers
58 views

Brehmsstrahlung radiation query - If an electron is constantly being decelerated, how does it emit a photon with a fixed energy?

According to my textbook they simply say an electron is decelerated by a nuclei and this means it loses KE. The difference in KE is given off as a photon. But an electron is always being pulled back ...
1
vote
1answer
81 views

How can an ion ever capture an electron if an electron requires a precise momentum to match a subsequent orbital?

Suppose an electron approaches a proton with greater energy than the hydrogen ground state. Will the electron scatter? If so, how could an electron ever be captured given it would require exactly the ...
0
votes
1answer
78 views

Can an electron steal speed or energy from the nucleus?

In classical mechanics, there is a famous effect called Sling-shot effect (the link will support a demonstration), by which the satellite orbiting the huge planet will steal some kinetic energy from ...

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