Linked Questions

17
votes
3answers
5k views

If electrons were positive and protons were negative, would life be different? [duplicate]

This was a question on a worksheet during my first week in a class on Electromagnetism. The answer is essentially: No. Life would be no different if electrons were positively charged and protons ...
12
votes
1answer
14k views

Who (and Why) started the “electrons are negative, protons are positive” convention? [duplicate]

For some reason everyone labels electrons using a minus sign and protons using a positive sign, even though the opposite seems more intuitive: Who started the convention that electrons should be "...
3
votes
2answers
9k views

Why are electrons defined to have negative charge? [duplicate]

We normally think of the "default" or "root" state of things as being on the positive side of the spectrum. For example, we don't normally use a + symbol to ...
0
votes
0answers
11k views

Why do current and electrons flow in opposite directions? [duplicate]

In representing an electric circuit, we would draw the sense of the current from the positive to the negative pole and the electrons from the negative to the positive . But as I know electrons' motion ...
0
votes
2answers
942 views

Why is the charge of a proton positive? [duplicate]

Is there a reason that a proton has a positive charge while an electron has a negative charge? Are these just names that were given to the charges or was there a reason for making a proton have a ...
0
votes
1answer
1k views

positive charge , current and electron flow in a simple circuit …confusion [duplicate]

my question is that in a simple circuit one wire attached with battery cell ,and then electrons start flowing from lower potential to higher and as we know in metal wire only electron is the thing ...
1
vote
2answers
472 views

What is the difference between poisitive and negative charge? [duplicate]

I would like to know what charge actually IS. Not the 'flow of electrons' charge but the charge because of which protons and electrons attract. I want to know why these attract and what the difference ...
0
votes
1answer
565 views

Why are electrons negative? [duplicate]

By my understanding their charge could have been called positive, and the charge of the proton and positron called negative. What are the historical reasons for this?
1
vote
0answers
195 views

Why aren't electrons positively charged? [duplicate]

For the study of electric circuits, it seems like it would have made more sense to establish that electrons carry a positive charge, and protons a negative one. That way, arrows representing current ...
0
votes
1answer
107 views

Why are electrons negetively charged? [duplicate]

Why have we assigned a negative charge to electrons (and positive for protons)? I feel it would be easier if electrons were positive (thereby, protons negative)- electrons would flow in the direction ...
1
vote
1answer
78 views

Please tell me that why aren't we discarding the conventional flow of current despite not being in sync with principle of potential difference [duplicate]

electric current flows from higher potential area (negative terminal) to lower potential area (positive terminal).this clearly indicates that electric flow (flow of electrons) takes place from ...
0
votes
0answers
8 views

Direction of the current and the electrons [duplicate]

If the electric current is defined as Coulomb/second, why is the direction of the current is just the opposite of the direction of the flow of electrons?
38
votes
5answers
23k views

If the Earth is a good conductor of electricity, why don't people get electrocuted every time they touch the Earth?

Since the Earth is a good conductor of electricity, is it safe to assume that any charge that flows down to the Earth must be redistributed into the Earth in and along all directions? Does this also ...
22
votes
3answers
17k views

How can the Hall effect ever show positive charge carriers?

The Hall effect can be used to determine the sign of the charge carriers, as a positive particle drifting along the wire and a negative particle drifting the other direction get deflected the same (as ...
12
votes
6answers
10k views

What are “electron holes” in semiconductors?

I'm tutoring senior high school students. So far I've explained them the concepts of atomic structure (Bohr's model & Quantum mechanical model) very clearly. Now the next topic to be taught is ...
12
votes
4answers
31k views

Why is an electron negatively charged, and what is the difference between negative and positive charges?

Nobody has yet defined the actual meaning of a charge, or why a negative charge is different from a positive charge. Everybody knows that positive charge is due to protons and negative charge is due ...
2
votes
3answers
27k views

Direction of current and direction of flow of electrons

My textbook says that the flow of current is from the positive to negative and my notebook say that the flow of electrons is from negative to positive. Why aren't they agreeing on one direction? Who ...
3
votes
4answers
4k views

Potential energy sign conventions

Almost every book on physics that I read have some weird and non-clear explanations regarding the potential energy. Ok, I do understand that if we integrate a force over some path, we'll get a ...
-2
votes
4answers
23k views

How can we know that a particular charge is positive or negative?

Suppose I am provided with a positive is charged....and someone tells me to find which type of charge is present in it? Then how can we detect that the body is positively or negatively charged? Is ...
2
votes
4answers
14k views

What is the difference between conventional current and electronic current?

what is the difference between conventional current and electronic current? How are they linked to one another?
5
votes
4answers
1k views

More about the right hand rule?

We started learning about electromagnetism in physics class, and the Right Hand Rule comes in handy as seems easy to use, but I'm curious as to how it actually works. I guess it's more of a math ...
1
vote
5answers
3k views

Why is charge of the electron negative?

How did scientists figure out that the charge of the electron was indeed negative? I know how the cathode ray tube experiment works, but how did Thompson know that the plate that the cathode ray beam ...
2
votes
1answer
2k views

Positive test charge

Protons have positive charge on them. Protons aren't mobile. So how can a positive test charge move from the negative terminal of a cell to the positive terminal and gain electric potential energy? ...
4
votes
1answer
411 views

What proved Conventional sense wrong?

What fact proved for the first time that the conventional sense of current was wrong? And when it did happen? As a corollary of this question, why do we say that electrons have negative charge? Is it ...
2
votes
2answers
1k views

Which charge actually moves to constitute current? Positive or negative?

Now this might be a very stupid question for many readers, but I am getting really confused. I was reading about electricity and current, and I read this: Suppose we connect a wire to the ends of a ...
0
votes
3answers
1k views

Why is conventional current still used in schematic diagrams?

I am a beginner in electronics and i am learning on my own. I am currently reading this book "Electronics for dummies" and after reading some pages of this book i have a LOT of questions. I know about ...
2
votes
2answers
564 views

Conventional current and electric current

When an external field is applied ,then electrons move in the direction opposite to that field, I want to know that does conventional current moves in the direction of field? A confusion is there in ...
-1
votes
1answer
774 views

Why is it said that electric current always flow from higher potential to lower potential?

Why is it said that electric current always flow from higher potential to lower potential? It is said that current flows from positive terminal to negative terminal, but it is actually the negative ...
2
votes
2answers
364 views

How can “…electrons flow in metals, but not in the ground…” explain grounding rods?

I really enjoyed Why is the charge naming convention wrong? But, in the comments at the very end, the statement that "...electrons flow in metals, but not in the ground..." left me uneasy. I was ...
1
vote
2answers
444 views

Direction of Current

All the questions that have asked relating to this topic have been too advanced for my high school-physics mind, but I am still interested in knowing it so here goes: I always thought that current in ...
0
votes
1answer
317 views

IF electrons flow in opposite direction to the electric current then what constitutes the current?

If electrons flow to the opposite direction to the electric current and the protons do not move instead they create the current, then what actually flows in the electric current? Since current is flow ...
1
vote
2answers
239 views

What is the fundamental reason for noise?

I have read that noise is a result of there being "no such thing as a perfect one-way valve". That energy transfer is never perfectly one-way; there will always (at some level) a finite flow of energy ...
2
votes
4answers
774 views

Effect of a magnetic field on cathode rays in a cathode ray tube

My question is regarding the direction in which cathode rays bend in a magnetic field. My book states that : When only electric field is applied, the electrons deviate from their path and hit ...
0
votes
2answers
267 views

Can quarks have anti-colors? [closed]

What is the reason that the color properties we call red, green and blue have become tied to quarks, while what we call anti-red, anti-green and anti-blue has become tied to anti-quarks? Do note that ...
1
vote
3answers
229 views

How to find the current if both positive and negative charges are moving?

A gas is connected to a copper conductor. In the gas, +6C of charge move to the left every second, and -6C of charge move to the right every second. What is the current in the copper conductor, and ...
0
votes
3answers
197 views

Are electric sources and sinks symmetrical?

When discussing sources and sinks for the property of divergence of electric fields, why is the positive polarity uniquely selected as a source and the other a sink? Aren't they both sources and sinks ...
0
votes
2answers
179 views

How can Current be positive when electrons have a negative charge?

I am a little confused. I have been told that electrons carry a charge of $-1.6 \cdot 10^{-19}$ coulombs, and that 1 coulomb is $6.25 \cdot 10^{18}$ electrons, and $1 \,\mathrm{A}$ is the current from ...
1
vote
4answers
125 views

Confusion about electron flow and current

So, I learned in class that current is defined as positive charges moving from south to north. However, in all reality, the negative charges are moving, but the convention of positive to negative wors ...
3
votes
1answer
76 views

What would have happened if electron was considered positive?

We always keep on telling that current flows opposite to electron, since electron is negatively charged. And old people didn't knew, that it is electron which actually flows.. So, now if we correct ...
1
vote
0answers
138 views

Benefits of the sign convention for electrons?

Benjamin Franklin considered electrons to be positive, but J.J. Thompson considered them negative. We obviously went with J.J. Thompson's convention. Why? What were the benefits of moving to J.J. ...
0
votes
2answers
88 views

Electron flow: Are these two simulations contradicting each other?

These two videos explain how a diode works: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W6QUEq0nUH8#t=03m25s (3:25) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JBtEckh3L9Q#t=07m40s (7:40) In the second video, electrons ...
1
vote
2answers
82 views

Does the Conventional Current flow consist out of anything? (virtual photons)

I've red that virtual photons are a way of interpreting the electromagnetic force between charged particles. Is convention current a electromagnetic field or force? Or is it a movement of ...
0
votes
1answer
56 views

Negative ampere and graphical convention

Since only electron's flow in electricity and electrons have negative charge, then why we don't say —1amps (—1C/s)? Secondly, as conventional way we write down independent variable in $x$ axis and ...