Linked Questions

2 votes
4 answers
27k views

Does inertia increase with speed? [duplicate]

I have heard that when the speed of the object increase, the mass of the object also increase. (Why does an object with higher speed gain more (relativistic) mass?) So inertia which is related to ...
owlp's user avatar
  • 165
3 votes
1 answer
635 views

What's the deal with Relativistic Mass? [duplicate]

So I have taken a first course in Special Relativity and the Relativistic Mass is defined as: $$m = \frac{m_o}{\sqrt{1 - v^2/c^2}}.$$ Now, when this was introduced in the course, it was introduced as ...
Silver's user avatar
  • 696
0 votes
2 answers
278 views

Is Feynman right? Does mass change with speed? [duplicate]

In chapter one of Feynman's famous Lectures on Physics, he writes the following. Mass is found to increase with velocity, but appreciable increases require velocities near that of light. A true law ...
Gauss's user avatar
  • 101
1 vote
2 answers
223 views

When talking about atomic mass, how is $E=mc^2$ factored in? [duplicate]

When talking about atomic mass in the periodic table of elements, is this number the mass of the element at rest? If I understand correctly, the (relativistic) mass of an element will increase as the ...
Scottie's user avatar
  • 275
0 votes
1 answer
138 views

Is 'rest mass' same for every observer/perspective? [duplicate]

(This is a quick one) Suppose Im standing still (in my perspective) and a hoverboard is flying at $0.8c$ w.r.t me. I see that the ball (red) is moving at $0.8c$. I measured earlier that the ball is $...
Rohit Shekhawat's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
124 views

Questions on Mass [duplicate]

In my eyes, mass is a property of "matter" (I suppose) that indicates how an object reacts (accelerates) to an applied force. In special relativity lectures, if I recall correctly: $F=γ^4m_0a$ So ...
Yannick Stulens's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
77 views

When a particle keeps "accelerating" near the speed of light, is the energy gained expressed in linearly gained impulse, or relativistic mass? [duplicate]

When a particle keeps "accelerating" near the speed of light, is the energy gained expressed in linearly gained impulse, or relativistic mass?
Entraya's user avatar
  • 11
-1 votes
1 answer
310 views

Where does the extra mass come from if an object approches speed of light? [duplicate]

According to scientists, if an object approaches the speed of light, a stage is reached where the object's speed is responsible for the increase in mass of the object. Beyond that stage, all the ...
Rithik's user avatar
  • 25
0 votes
0 answers
61 views

For Einstein's equation $E= mc^2$ is it energy that increases or mass as the velocity increases? [duplicate]

I will be surprised if no one asked this before and I would be happy if it is answered already although I haven't located it just yet! From Einstein's original paper "Does The Inertia of a Body ...
user avatar
-5 votes
1 answer
73 views

Is the "mass means rest mass" school of thought within relativity theory still "Einstein's theory of relativity"? [duplicate]

Is the "mass means rest mass" (MMRM) school of thought within relativity theory still "Einstein's theory of relativity"? I have read that both MMRM and "mass depends on ...
Matthew Christopher Bartsh's user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
50 views

Is mass relative? [duplicate]

Since time is relative to the observer's velocity, does that mean that velocities are also relative, since the same distance is covered in a different time, depending on your reference frame? If ...
Nureddino's user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
48 views

Definition of mass in agreement with relativity [duplicate]

Generally, the mass of a body is defined as the amount of matter contained in it. But we also know from relativity that "mass of a body increases as it approaches the speed of light". Going by the old ...
Rikhil Gupta's user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
34 views

Speeding up mass to the speed of light [duplicate]

Suppose you have mass of 1kg as you start to move it at a speed which is 90% of the speed of light then what will happen to that mass? Will it increase?
Mahesh's user avatar
  • 301
0 votes
0 answers
16 views

Mass of a free falling object [duplicate]

What does General Theory say about the mass change of a freely falling object in a gravitational field? That is, does its mass change as the velocity increases? And, similarly, does the mass of an ...
M. Pope's user avatar
  • 97
208 votes
10 answers
267k views

If photons have no mass, how can they have momentum?

As an explanation of why a large gravitational field (such as a black hole) can bend light, I have heard that light has momentum. This is given as a solution to the problem of only massive objects ...
david4dev's user avatar
  • 2,764

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