Linked Questions

0
votes
1answer
514 views

Why does an electron have left-handed and right-handed components? [duplicate]

An electron is assumed to be a point particle that does not have structure. Why does it have left-handed and right-handed components? Does this imply that the electron has structure or volume?
-3
votes
1answer
261 views

What is the smallest particle? What is the building block of an electron? [duplicate]

I'm curious. Why when I was 5 years old did I rip things apart in half... Always trying to get another half... is it endless? I took a leaf and ripped it in half, and kept on going... God?
2
votes
0answers
338 views

Why does the electric dipole moment of the electron tell us about its sphericity? [duplicate]

There are a bunch of experiments that claim to show that the electron is highly spherical by measuring the electron electric dipole moment. See e.g.: http://physicsworld.com/cws/article/news/2013/nov/...
1
vote
1answer
188 views

What does it mean for a particle to have volume? [duplicate]

As far as I understand, we do not know whether an electron is a point particle or not, but we have a very low upper bound for its potential volume. If it turns out that electrons do have volume, what ...
2
votes
0answers
165 views

Electric dipole moment(EDM) underlying physics [duplicate]

I read in a physics today paper, The electron can have nonvanishing EDM only if nature violates symmetry under time reversal (T) and under the combined operations of charge conjugation (C), which ...
0
votes
1answer
101 views

Does the electron have size? [duplicate]

Can we ascertain the size of the electron? If it really is zero radius, then it can't be matter because it doesn't occupy space? Definition of matter (Google): physical substance in general, as ...
1
vote
2answers
68 views

What principle of quantum mechanics tells us that harmonic fluctuations of a field act like localized particles? [duplicate]

"Quasiparticles" are ubiquitous in condensed matter physics, e.g. magnons and phonons, and more generally all particles in quantum field theory are considered the elementary harmonic ...
1
vote
1answer
63 views

If electron carries negative charge, why bother looking for it's electric dipole moment? [duplicate]

I got confused after reading about spherical electron, would there really be some type of unknown particles popping in and out of existence within the virtual particle cloud around the electron that ...
0
votes
1answer
47 views

Can we meaningfully talk about the size of an elementary particle irrespective of its quantum state? [duplicate]

Elementary particles such as the electron are quantum mechanical fuzzy objects described by quantum states or wavefunctions. They are not classical billiard balls with some fixed radius. Can we assign ...
2
votes
0answers
60 views

Does an electron occupy a definite volume? [duplicate]

The proton is about 1.6–1.7 fm in diameter. Quoted from Wikipedia. That is,The proton just occupies a definite volume or a definite space. But I can't find the radius of an electron in Wikipedia. Can ...
1
vote
0answers
34 views

Shape of electron [duplicate]

Today, in the BBC Science section, a headline reads that the Imperial College of London has determined that the shape of the electron is completely spherical. In a physics book I'm reading now, the ...
1
vote
0answers
30 views

How is the mass of an electron distributed? [duplicate]

Since the position of an electron is not determined, how is it’s mass distributed ? In other words, how does an electron curve space time ? .
46
votes
4answers
6k views

What is the mass density distribution of an electron?

I am wondering if the mass density profile $\rho(\vec{r})$ has been characterized for atomic particles such as quarks and electrons. I am currently taking an intro class in quantum mechanics, and I ...
27
votes
5answers
3k views

Where is the evidence that the electron is pointlike?

I'm writing a piece about the electron, and I'm having trouble finding evidence to back up the claim that the evidence is pointlike. People tend to say the observation of a single electron in a ...
16
votes
2answers
5k views

If atoms never “physically” touch each other, then how does matter-antimatter annihilation happen?

It is known that matter and antimatter annihilate each other when they "touch" each other. And as far as I know, the concept of "touching" as our brain gets it is not true on the atomic level since ...

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