0
$\begingroup$

Is mirror displaying the original image. Is there a constraint for the reflective property of mirror. Does mirror reflect with 100% perfection?

$\endgroup$
  • $\begingroup$ You question is far too wide-open to be answered usefully. Can you try to define what you think "correct" and "100% perfection" mean? Color match? Distortion of image? Loss of light intensity? and so on. $\endgroup$ – Carl Witthoft Feb 11 '14 at 12:59
  • 2
    $\begingroup$ Most mirrors are aluminum second-surface mirrors, which have an average reflectivity in the visible range of roughly 90%. So yes, there is loss. $\endgroup$ – DumpsterDoofus Feb 11 '14 at 14:05
  • $\begingroup$ @DumpsterDoofus I take major exception to your claim of "most" . Maybe most consumer-grade home use mirrors are, but there's rather a large number of applications which use significantly different materials. $\endgroup$ – Carl Witthoft Feb 11 '14 at 14:45
  • 1
    $\begingroup$ @CarlWitthoft: True, although the OP seemed to be referring to home-use mirrors. $\endgroup$ – DumpsterDoofus Feb 11 '14 at 14:59
  • $\begingroup$ Related: Is a Perfect/Lossless Mirror possible?. See also a perfect mirror at Wikipedia. $\endgroup$ – kenorb Feb 4 '15 at 14:23
1
$\begingroup$

An electrically conductive first surface mirror cannot be as efficient as a multi-layer first surface dielectric mirror. The reflection mechanisms are different - absorption and re-emission vs. optical resonance.

What is a "correct" image? If you want high fidelity return, use a fused silica corner cube operating via total internal reflection. Do you want to reverse intermediary optical aberrations? Use a phase conjugate mirror. Viewing your face in a phase conjugate mirror will be a spiritual experience.

Don a pair of circularly-polarized 3-D movie glasses, then look in mirror. Close one eye, Whoa! What will be the result of closing both eyes?

$\endgroup$
  • $\begingroup$ PCMs are certainly fascinating... You say "viewing your face in a phase conjugate mirror will be a spiritual experience." Can you elaborate? I'm not sure what I would expect to see. Illuminated with coherent monochromatic light? Passing through a distorting or scattering medium? Would it look interesting just to stare into a "bare" PCM? What would you see? I don't have access to one (and may never have), so I'm curious if you know. $\endgroup$ – Kevin H. Patterson Jul 19 '17 at 1:29
1
$\begingroup$

Does mirror reflect with 100% perfection?

No mirror will have 100% reflectivity, there will always be some absorption.

This can be applied for most ideal objects, since perfection does not exist.

I doubt that am i seeing the correct reflection of myself?

I don't understand this part.

$\endgroup$
  • 1
    $\begingroup$ which means am i seeing my same color etc through a mirror, eg when you take a photograph it may look more perfect than what i see myself in mirror.. $\endgroup$ – Sajin Shereef Feb 12 '14 at 3:30

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.